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bhryun

ERROL FLYNN

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I also found the documentary to be wonderful! I had a feeling that 'ole Rudy Behlmer was gonna pop up but I didn't find him as annoying as usual.

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The documentary was superb, I learned so much. His widow, was really interesting, and without a doubt Olivia de Havilland added tremendously to the program.

 

I never knew he wrote 2 novels. And the analysis of the rape trial, where even Olivia de Havilland alluded to the financial "support" provided by Jack Warner to LA government officials was fascinating. I can see why Jack Warner kept him under contract for so many years, even after most other big stars like Cagney and Davis were gone from the studio roster. Plus finally seeing pieces of the long lost Jack Cardiff footage from the unfinished "William Tell" was a real treat.

 

In the last few months I have seen several of his films for the first time, including the very enjoyable GENTLEMEN JIM, and NORTHERN PURSUIT, and THE DAWN PATROL. As the documentary makes clear, he really was quite a good actor. I have the videos of THAT FORSYTHE SAGA and UNCERTAIN GLORY, both of which I have never seen, but now really want to see.

 

There are a few things I wanted more info about, such as why did they not even mention Bette Davis and Errol Flynn's first picture together, THE SISTERS made in 1938? And why were the other 2 daughters not even shown or mentioned? And finally, LOL, who owns those 3 impressionist masterpieces now? They must be worth a fortune! But without a doubt it was one of the best documentaries I have seen about a Hollywood star.

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I watched the second showing of the doc. Wasn't he just fabulous? I vaguely knew about his life story, but like Reynolds said even if 40% of it was true it was still a fascinating (and tragic) life. However, I didn't like the fact that he took up with such young women, especially when he met Patricia Alband (was that her name?) when he was 48 and she was 15. Ewwww!

 

BTW, do you think Burt Reynolds has had some "work" done? His face was tighter than Dick's hat band.

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I agree, Path...this new Documentary about Errol Flynn is among the best I've yet seen Turner produce and TCM air for us. Everyone interviewed brought something significant with them about Flynn's life, both on screen and off. It doesn't get any better than this. ML

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I agree, it doesn't get any better than this. This was undoubtedly one of the best bios I've ever seen of Flynn and it helped tremendously to have Patrice Wymore, Nora Eddington, Olivia de Havilland and others talking about him and revealing so much. He obviously had their respect, despite his flaws, and for once his acting ability was clearly defined by the film clips themselves. Like many of us feel, he was a vastly underrated actor merely because he looked best of all in adventure films wielding a sword!

 

UNCERTAIN GLORY with Flynn and Paul Lukas looked like an interesting film. Have never seen it but wish TCM would give it a run. Maybe it's on the Flynn schedule.

 

Neil

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Brackenhe, the name of the juvenile who Flynn took up with at age 15 is Beverly Aadland who is now 61.

********************************************************

Richardny, of Flynn's 4 children, sadly two have passed away. His daughter Arnella with Patrice Wymore died in 1998. His son Sean with Lili Damita died in 1970. He disappeared in Cambodia and believed killed by captors.

Of his two daughters by Nora Eddington only Deirdre (who I thought was a man at first) spoke on the documentary about her dad. Her sister Rory did not participate.

 

Mongo

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For anyone who missed the documentary, as I did, it is next on at 10:00pm on Tuesday, the 19th of April. Sounds like must-see teevee!

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Yes, it was an outstanding production. Great clips, good commentaries. As usual, it was wonderful to hear Olivia de Havilland's stories. Most of all, one comes away realizing that Flynn's acting was often underrated. One minor quibble: The mention of Warner's sale of the rights of Gone With the Wind to MGM (actually Selznick) was so rushed that its historical significance would be lost to anyone unfamiliar with what really occurred. In 1936 Jack Warner bought the rights to GWTW as a present[$50,000] for Bette Davis. When she found out that Errol Flynn was Jack Warner's choice for Rhett Butler, she hit the ceiling, loudly telling Mr. Warner (and the entire Warner's lot) that Flynn was no actor and she would never play opposite him in this epic. Perhaps she had a wild idea that L.B. Mayer would loan Gable to Warners, but that was an absurd hope. The reason Davis' actions are significant is that if she had cooled down, done some tests/rehearsals with Flynn, she may have changed her mind. It's unfortunate it took her years to realize her mistake, but at least she had the honesty to admit she was wrong. In contrast, over at MGM, Gable did not want the part of Rhett Butler, refused to learn a southern accent, disliked Vivien Leigh, got George Cukor fired, and mostly walked through the film with little effort. GWTW would have been definitive roles for Davis and Flynn, although I am uncertain if Davis' portrayal as Scarlett would be as believeable and memorable as Vivien Leigh's.

 

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I also caught the second showing of the documentary. I was suprised by his being a herion addict. I always knew about the drinking, drugs were a bit of a shock.

 

I felt sorry for him as I was watching, always getting screwed over by other people. Form his friend who was the Nazi sympathizer, to the rape trial which was all based on revenge against Warner.

 

However my image of him being one of the greatest actors hasn't changed. In fact, just before I came to work I watched "The Adventures of Robin Hood". He may have been typecast by the role, but it is a role that I can't imagine anyone else playing.

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that you search for a copy of Flynn's autobiographical book, "My Wicked Wicked Ways".

 

It is an eye opener, tells much about Flynn's love of the sea, and was quite enlightening to me, when I got it from the library when I was sixteen years old.

 

For stuff on Flynn's trials and tribulations on his boat, and his most famous Hollywood attorney [Geisler?] one has to look for other biographies though.

 

Reading a book on Bette Davis, is also an eye opener in detailing how little she liked Flynn. The animosity was so thick, that supposedly when he knocked her down with a blow to her gluteus maximus in "Elizabeth the Queen" ["Elizabeth and Essex"] it was not in the script and was intentional on Flynn's part to take down the haughty one!

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There are a number of interesting books available on Errol Flynn. He actually was a spy, but not for the Germans, he worked for a while for the British before becoming a United Sates citizen, reference "The Spy Who Never Was" by Tony Thomas, Citadel Press, C 1990

 

Also, a fantastic book on Warner Bros.,containing hundreds of interoffice memo's from Warners top brass and stars alike from 1935- 1951, "Inside Warner Bros"., Rudy Behlmer, Viking Press, C 1985, once you pick it up, you won't want to put it down....

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I have his commentary on the DVDs of THE ADV. OF ROBIN HOOD and GWTW--as well as his books INSIDE WARNER BROS. and MEMO FROM DARRYL F. ZANUCK--and my only criticism is that he tends to be almost too detailed in his film commentary.

 

Not only that, but instead of directing his comments toward the scene taking place on the screen he goes off on a tangent describing production costs, history of a performer, etc. at a time when you want him to make a comment on the current scene where you know there is an anecdote that he is failing to mention.

 

Do you know what I mean??? Does anyone else find fault with the almost exhausting amount of info???

 

He certainly is qualified--and most knowledgable--but has a tendency to overdo, IMO.

 

Neil

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Probably a stupid question, but I'm gonna risk it because I'm that curious, and y'all seem to know a lot about the man and his work:

 

In Never Say Goodbye, was that really Errol Flynn doing a Bogie impression? If so, he's the all-time best! I wasn't even sure it was an impression; the impression or language was general, but it does sound exactly like Bogie. If they were friends, I can see how clever it would be to have Bogart lend his voice to Flynn's tough guy scene, and I can even see them doing it uncredited. If that's the case, then Errol Flynn is the best lip syncher of all-time.

 

Either way, I'm impressed and fascinated -- and I wish I'd taped it so I could watch it again.

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That was the voice of Humphrey Bogart - they both worked for Warners at that time so it was not a matter of a friend lending his voice, more a matter of working under contract and doing as the boss asked.....

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As a little girl, I was always in love with Errol Flynn.

I always thought he was a great actor. As an adult I really think he was terrific. The special on TCM about his life was so informative. It is ashame he never really knew how great he really was. I think he was believable in every role he ever played. He was able to make viewers especially women, see him as a tender lover, romantic hero,and he did it with style and witt.

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Thanks, catanzaro! Yesterday, I found an (amateur) online review that said it was impression, and I just wasn't convinced.

 

What you said about being under contract makes a lot of sense, but I don't understand why they didn't credit Bogart. (or did they, and I missed it?)

 

Also, does anyone remember if Flynn and Bogart were pals? I've read 2 Bogart bios, but can't recall with certainty.

 

(I have a feeling that more than one married star ended up in the doghouse by partying with Mr. Flynn.)

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Under the old studio system the actors signed long term contracts and management could do almost anything with their stars, not giving credit is not uncommon, as for Bogart, credit was not necessary in this film as every fan knew his voice quite well.

 

Flynn and Bogart knew each other and also worked together (Virginia City,1940)but travelled in different circles off the Warners lot...

 

Not only was Flynn a big drinker on and off the lot, so was Bogart....

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I like Flynn. He's a good actor. I think he's got a lot of good movies. What about Olivia? Does anybody like her?

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Maybe I should ask this question here since everyone knows so much about Errol Flynn.. There is a clip on TCM of him coming through a door and he seems to shove down a woman sorta off camera. What movie is that? I have to admit, before this month- **blush** I had never watched a movie with Errol Flynn - I still have not caught Robin Hood- but since catching Santa Fe Trail, Never Say Goodbye, and half of Escape Me Never, I am once again falling in love. What a ****. Ooooh, and there is a shot of him being slapped and then flashing a huge smile. What movie is that from? Both Black & white. Any help? Oh, and most do love Olivia de Havilland Holly, she is a sweetie and a great actress. Check out " The Heiress" with Montgomery Clift and Olivia, it's great.

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Hi, Yokozbornak:

 

No, absolutely not. Bogie absolutely and totally detested Erroll Flynn no end. They made at least one movie together, a western called "Virginia City." That was part of the problem. Bogie looked ridiculous on a horse or in Westerns. Bogie also did not approve of Flynn's devil-may-care attitude toward life and did not approve of him appearing late on the set.

 

Added to all that tension between Flynn and Bogie, add the presence of charming Miriam Hopkins, up to her usual on-set shananigans of causing trouble and making a tense set even more tense. I've often wondered what the fourth star of the picture, Randolph Scott, thought of all the goings on.

 

That probably was Flynn doing a Bogie imitation, unless they took the line from another Bogart film and dubbed it. I highly doubt Bogie would have done something like that, unless he was ordered to do it.

 

Like I said, Bogie despised Flynn. He also despised William Holden (the feeling was mutual) and Audrey Hepburn. What he had against sweet Audrey, I don't know. Bill Holden did not approve of the way he treated Audrey.

 

Bogart was a fine actor. I have a lot of respect for his as an actor and a person. However, I think sometimes he went too far in the way he dealt with people. I can't really blame Bogart for what happened on "Virginia City." That really wasn't his fault. But, he had no earthly reason to be as nasty to Audrey as he was.

 

Bogie could be a needler and abrasive when he wanted to be. He still was a great actor.

 

Deborah

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This is how the matter is described by Tony Thomas, Rudy Behlmer, and Clifford MCCarty "The Films of Errol Flynn" in their notes for "Never Say Goodbye":

 

"The script also allowed Flynn to sing a few bars of the song "Remember Me" and do an imitation of Humphrey Bogart--greatly aided by the dubbed-in voice of Bogart himself."

 

Janus

 

 

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Olivia de Havilland was great in her day, I think. Although she didn't get Monty Clift, she got Leslie Howard, Errol Flynn, Henry Fonda, and many more. I think, when you talk about Flynn, you've got to talk about Olivia some...she played in several films with him.

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Olivia de Havilland was an excellent actress, winner of two Academy Awards, born in Tokyo, Japan, living in Paris for many years and New York, we all await her autobiography.

 

Actually she (in the film)dumps Monty at the end and speaking on Monty Clift, fans living in the New York City area can visit his grave site. He is interred at the Friends (Quaker) Cemetery in Brooklyn's Prospect Park, the cemetery pre-dates the park, you enter at 16th Street and walk to the grave site at the far end, you don't have to enter the cemetery proper as you can see the site from outside looking in...

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Thanks for that, Deborah, how interesting! I'm as surprised by his dislike of Holden as you are about Audrey Hepburn. Both men seem gracious, and probably were, but we can all be ornery at times.

 

They were both great actors, and the more I watch Errol Flynn, the more I like him, too. And Olivia de Havilland? What talent and stunning beauty, I just love her! (Holly suddenly has me wanting to read Olivia's biography.)

 

The script notes made me chuckle. Thanks, Janus. It must've been awkward for Flynn to be on the spot to do an impression of a man he despised (& vice versa), then having it dubbed by that man. Trying to imagine both men's perspectives at the time, it certainly would've stunk for Flynn.

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Oh, I wish I had seen catanzaro's post first, I sat on the page too long without refreshing. Shame on me! I took Holly literally. Still a fascinating story, I'm sure. (I don't know where y'all get your smilies, so imagine a blushing face here.)

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