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TCM is at it again


TCMfan23
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Last night , I was looking through the TV guide on my TV and seen a few 80s movies on TCM in September. What's up with that ?

 

why does TCM have to sneak in a few 80s movies in their schedule every month ?

 

september 5th : orlando 1992 4:30 am

september 25th : story of women - 1989 2am

 

i believe tcm should stay old. studio system films only. the other cable channels can show later films. sundays will always be silent sunday (silent era films).

 

The one thing I like about the september schedule are the showings of fatty arbuckle films.

 

 

 

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I agree with you, TCMfan, but at least there are only a few and they're on in the middle of the night. It's when modern movies are on at primetime that it really bothers me as that's the perfect opportunity to get people hooked on classic films (if they already aren't).

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Probably because they ran out of Irene Dunne movies and didn't want to bore people with Tyrone Power movies just yet?

 

Interesting that, the only co-star who made her shine was the wonderful and glorious Cary Grant in My Favorite Wife and The Awful Truth, which as I type them I still can't tell them apart, other than to note that the judge in the one with Cary's boyfriend Randolph was wonderful, and that (did anyone else notice, talk about no one paying attention on set!) Cary had perspiration stains when he put on the awful leopard dressing gown he got as a present from Gail Russell!

 

If only the new non-classic movies were relegated to the middle of the night, TCMfan, as the old movies were relegated to the middle of the night on AMC before they went to Satan, we would all be in heaven.

 

BTW, did you notice that Cablevision is again holding a station hostage, this time WPIX?

 

 

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<the wonderful and glorious Cary Grant in My Favorite Wife and The Awful Truth, which as I type them I still can't tell them apart, other than to note that the judge in the one with Cary's boyfriend Randolph was wonderful>

 

 

 

 

 

Both quite entertaining, but that's how I tell 'em apart, too.

 

 

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The same old, same old...I don't understand the need to complain every time TCM shows something that one or two viewers don't agree with. This "TCM should stay old" is an OLD argument itself....I've seen the subject pop up way too many times here.

 

One or two films from the 90's or even the 80's aren't gonna kill you....Just change the channel if you don't like it.

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Nobody is a bigger advocate of the studio-era films than I. However, it is abundantly clear that films of the 70s - 2000s will be shown on TCM. They always have been and always will be. It's not gonna change.* It is my hope that pre-1946 titles will continue to be emphasized since there really isn't anyplace else to see them on television. I would like to see more rare Columbia titles (especially those that were scheduled and subsequently cancelled). I continue to hope that we will see 1930s & 40s titles from Universal and Paramount (particularly the former). And what of the elusive pre-1936 Fox titles (TRICK FOR TRICK, please)? I've also made the suggestion of Monogram Pictures for Star of the Month.

*I'm a fan of TCM Underground and enjoy seeing a mix of 30s-70s titles there.

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Old movies, like time, is relative. A movie made in 1990 is 22 years old. Old enough to drink, and THAT might be considered an "old" movie to someone born in 1996. For TCMfan, it's a lifetime.

 

 

Now for me, I humorously claim that any movie made since 1951 is NOT old, but let's face facts. I'm no "spring chicken". Hell, I'm not even a FALL chicken. Just a grizzled old yardbird. So those post '51 movies CAN be considered old.

 

 

But I think any '80's or '90's movies TCM shows SHOULD be shown because there's something exceptional about them. Not merely some commercial formulated swill.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

>

>

> *But I think any '80's or '90's movies TCM shows SHOULD be shown because there's something exceptional about them. Not merely some commercial formulated swill.*

>

>

>

> *Sepiatone*

>

I do agree with the bolded. To me, TCM should show studio era films first and secondly, great movies. If you show Forrest Gump on TCM I have no problem with that but if you're showing Waterworld just to show a newer movie..I have to draw the line lol.

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Y'know, I'd have no problem with the Indiana Jones movies being shown either. Even though they're shown elsewhere, they'd not be cut on TCM. And the film-making "style" will fit in.

 

 

(Although cutting parts of that silly blonde woman screeching in "Temple of Doom" might not be a bad idea.)

 

 

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TCM SHOULD NEVER show newer films(late 70s to 2000s). You people are all getting too soft. Junk like Forrest Gump doesn't belong on TCM. It's not a classic movie. I'll go ape if Indiana Jones or Back to the future is shown on TCM. TCM needs to stay true to its form. 80s stuff belongs on other channels like TBS , TNT , Showtime , Movie Channel.

 

studio films only ! silent films on sunday evenings !

 

TCM Underground is ruining this channel.Those movies are crud. Get rid of it and have a chiller theatre type of thing instead. No need for a horror host. Vampira is no longer around and everyone else sucks. Maybe Joe Bob Briggs might work. He did MonsterVision on TNT back in the good 'ol days.

 

TCM's camp theatre, hosted by joe bob briggs - I'LL TUNE IN FOR THAT. Every Friday night 11 pm - 3 am.

if you can't get joe bob briggs , get roger corman to do the job.

 

 

 

 

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> TCM SHOULD NEVER show newer films(late 70s to 2000s).

 

As others have pointed out, they've been showing movies from all decades since they debuted eighteen years ago.

 

> TCM needs to stay true to its form.

 

By showing films from all decades, It is staying true to its form.

 

> You people are all getting too soft.

 

Insulting people doesn't convert people to your side.

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> {quote:title=TCMfan23 wrote:}{quote}TCM SHOULD NEVER show newer films(late 70s to 2000s). You people are all getting too soft. Junk like Forrest Gump doesn't belong on TCM. It's not a classic movie.

>

First of all, who are you to be so rudely telling anyone they are "getting too soft"? ]:)

 

Secondly, all you're doing here is incessantly and unreasonably COMPLAINING for no real reason, and with no further backup to what you're complaining about. You seem to be doing so ONLY for the sake of complaining. :P

 

Late 70's is NOT newer...it's already 35 years or more since then. ;)

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Insulting people doesn't convert people to your side.

 

Looks like lzcutter is on a different board from the rest of us.

 

As others have pointed out, they've been showing movies from all decades since they debuted eighteen years ago.

 

And as those of us who have pointed out that TCM shows a lot of garbage (mmmmm, Evil Under The Sun surely was a good one) along with some classic films, you don't have all the answers.

 

TCMfan, just think of TCM as Turner Current Movies, and you will be fine. Ignore those who can't handle the truth, and you will be even finer than fine.

 

 

 

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Universal; I do see a legit point here if TCM shows too many non studio era (say pre 1968), movies. The question is what is 'too many' for the majority of TCM viewers. It is my understanding that over 80% of their programming is studio era movies so to me as long as that percentage remains 'over 80%', I'm fine. But when one reads nonfactual comments related to TCM programming like 'along with some classic films' it is clear all they are trying to do is complain without any regard to the movies TCM actually airs. (the term 'some' clearly implies a minority which of course just isn't the case).

 

 

 

 

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I think an occasional judicious newer movie would be ok. Too many and TCM would be like FOX or AMC, or so many other networks, and then, what's the point? Every organization has its "brand," and that could be tarnished, and for what reason? TCM has a great, recognized brand, no company in its right mind would want to mess with that.

 

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The two films singled out in the original post weren't just added willy-nilly to the TCM schedule. Both have been chosen for specific reasons.

 

Like it has every Labor Day for the past few years, TCM is celebrating the Telluride Film Festival September 3rd with 24-hours of programming highlighting events at past festivals there. *Orlando* (1992) is being shown that day to salute actress Tilda Swinton who was a Telluride Festival honoree in 2011.

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/495623%7C0/Telluride-Film-Festival-Tribute-9-3.html

 

Slim, tall, ginger, and intense, Oscar-winner Tilda Swinton has become one of the most respected actresses of her generation. But in 1992, when Sally Potter cast her as Orlando in her idiosyncratic adaptation of Virginia Woolf's revolutionary 1928 novel "Orlando: A Biography," Swinton was largely unknown. She had been busy in theater and on television in Britain and was a defining presence in the provocative films of Derek Jarman. Orlando may not have made her a star, but it certainly introduced her to filmgoers the world over and launched a career that since blossomed.

 

*Story Of Women* (1988) is being presented as one of the September "TCM Imports" features.

importssept2012_apt_678x230_082120120314

 

They called Claude Chabrol "the French Hitchcock," but this was always more a marketing hook than a meaningful comparison. Alfred Hitchcock made crowd-pleasing suspense thrillers; Chabrol made vicious satires disguised as suspense thrillers. For decades, Chabrol had been crafting spiky, embittered dramas simmering with disgust for humanity in general and the French bourgeoisie in specific. He had his eye on making a pointed attack on Vichy France.

 

The details of history are relevant: here is a quick summary. In 1940, facing imminent defeat to Nazi Germany, France capitulated and installed a puppet fascist state headed by former war hero Philippe Petain. Because his reactionary government was based in Vichy, instead of Paris, the term "Vichy France" refers to those four nightmare years when France chose to turn itself into a Nazi satellite.

 

Among the many things the Vichy regime did to mollify the German occupiers was to promise that the Vichy State Tribunal would execute a certain number of criminals. Unable to meet that quota with the usual suspects of hardened criminals and Communists, the Tribunal broadened its jurisdiction, roped in retired and otherwise unqualified jurists to stock its benches, and started hunting for more people to execute.

 

In the midst of this, a young woman named Marie-Louise Giraud was arrested for performing back-alley abortions. What she was doing was illegal, and in any circumstances she was destined to get into trouble over it. Under Petain, it got her beheaded. Giraud was the last woman guillotined in France, and her story fascinated screenwriter Francis Szpiner.

 

Szpiner researched the case, and focused on the cruel irony of a state wishing to make an example of how women ought not say no to being mothers, but did so by depriving Giraud's own children of their mother. *Une Affaire de Femmes (Story of Women, 1988)* was the resulting film, in which writer Szpiner stayed close to the historical facts while giving director Chabrol an opportunity to bring his legendary sensibility to the material.

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/495637%7C0/TCM-Imports-September-Schedule.html

 

What I find funny about this is that the four hours of these two "new" films (and both are TCM Premieres) is more than offset by September's four _nights_ of Mack Sennett shorts/fims being shown on TCM for the very first time.

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Once dubbed "The King of Comedy," producer and director Mack Sennett was a ringmaster for a motley crew of comedic talent that included Charlie Chaplin, Fatty Arbuckle, Mabel Normand and the Keystone Kops, who slid, slipped and slapped their way across American movie screens of the 1910s. His anarchic world of cross-eyed rubes, nightmare-bearded villains, comely bathing beauties and bumbling cops falling off cliffs, out of buildings, and throwing custard pies was an unexpected creation of a man who grew up wanting to be an opera star. Sennett's brand of crude slapstick humor proved to be highly popular with audiences and helped him become one of the most powerful men of early Hollywood. With outside financial backing, Sennett set up his famed Keystone Studios in 1912 and began cracking out one- and two-reel shorts by the hundreds. He also ventured into feature filmmaking, most notably with "Tillie's Punctured Romance" (1914), starring Mabel Normand, with whom he had a long and problematic romance until the mid-1920s. In 1917, Sennett left Keystone to make movies independently, only to stubbornly hold onto a tired, out-dated formula throughout the 1920s and 1930s. Among the pratfalls, chases, character stereotypes and pantomime, Sennett set the tone in Hollywood's early days and created the ground rules for American screen comedy that were to follow.

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/495622%7C0/Mack-Sennett-TCM-Spotlight.html

 

So keep it all in perspective, people. No one should worry about the direction of TCM when September includes such a historically significant event as the Mack Sennett tribute (Thursdays) along with an Oscar Levant evening (September 1), a Gregory LaCava evening (September 18) and an Adolph Menjou evening (September 21).

 

It's going to be a great month.

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I had high hopes for *Orlando.* It's one of my favorite novels. Obviously a big challenge to film, I think *Potter* made rather a stodgy mess of it -- all British art direction and not very good cinema. (I say this as a respectful Anglophile who always looks for the best in British work.) Swinton was good in the strange eponymous role, but the weight of the film defeated everyone involved with it. It never quite achieves "the wild goose..."

 

I haven't seen it since it came out -- I will look at it on TCM and see if my opinion has changed.

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