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RMeingast

Star Autographs...

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This is related to the "Hollywood Hat" thread somewhat.

 

Read an article in paper on weekend about Hollywood celebrities appearing at a FanExpo in Toronto, Canada this weekend.

 

The celebrities are charging various amounts of dough for their autographs/photos with fans...

 

Some examples:

 

Gillian Anderson - $50 for autograph, $50 for photo opp.

 

Levar Burton - $30 for autograph, $40 for photo opp.

 

Christopher Lloyd - $50 for autograph, $50 for photo opp.

 

I'll leave it to you to judge whether or not those prices are a rip off or not... And also whether the autographs/photos have any lasting value whatsoever...

 

Article here:

 

http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/08/24/fanexpo-escapism-nostalgia-and-good-feelings-for-sale-at-toronto-convention/

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Former pro sports players have been doing it for years, and I think it devalues their autographs in real dollars for the people obtaining the sigs. The players and/or actors don't care because they're getting paid. It's a conundrum--it's hard to blame the autographers for wanting to benefit.

 

Bottom line is that it's a money making business on both ends, but it seems to destroy the whole excitement & spontainity of getting signatures.

 

 

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Heard (or read) somewhere that Cary Grant didn't like signing autographs, so he used to charge 25 cents per.

 

 

I think some celebs charge but then give the $ to charity.

 

 

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This is nothing so new to consider, since many stars over the years have charged fans for an autograph. It all probably started as a means to keep an overzealous fan away and not be bothered. Certainly, the most prevalent issue are movie stars becoming agitated to discovering individuals who make a living by profiting from their signatures or whatever personal items they might have once owned. Also, there is an ever growing market of fraudulent materials being sold or said to have been sanctioned by the movie star. So, when you add up or figure out what might be a situation gone erratic and not reasonably subjugated, it stands to reason why various motion picture stars will ask for a payment to what might be later on exploited for profit. Most movie stars I have known over my long years around show business, have tried to be fair and not be so downtrodden over this issue of whether or not they should give an autograph. In the old days, the studio did send out some signed materials, but on a limited basis. Of course, most of the 8x10 photograph stills sent out to fans with a signature were multilithed or printed onto the photo. These types of photos or autographs are a dine a dozen!

 

 

I just don’t see the big deal about charging, since a diehard movie fan will want his or her favorite star’s autograph at whatever cost! And, let’s not forget about the lucrative trade in sports memorabilia that as of now has its high pricing, sometimes at levels most fans can’t even afford. Usually, at these memorabilia shows or movie conventions, the celebrities are paid. One of my all time personal heroes, Joe DiMaggio had to be paid each and every time he stepped into a convention hall, as thousands of the fans would stand in line, having paid about 15 to 20 dollars to have Joe D. sign a photo, a ball, glove or bat. But, often if Joe was out on the street and felt comfortable enough, he would sign his name on just about anything, free of charge. After all is said and done, I believe Joe D. just didn’t want to totally alienate the fans who had come to admire him throughout his lifetime. He was for me rather strange, since he was mostly something of a quiet, sort of secretive man. I once got up enough courage to bother Joe and ask, “Is it difficult for you to deal with the fans, always asking you for something?” Joe responded, “It depends on how I feel, when I first get up in the morning . . . Sometimes I have my feel good days and others not so good . . . So, it’s a crapshoot for the fans when they approach me.”

 

 

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>helenbaby said: Bottom line is that it's a money making business on both ends, but it seems to destroy the whole excitement & spontainity of getting signatures.

 

And I think this is one of the reasons for the "autograph assembly line". These people know many are gathering autographs to sell, so they figure they might as well have a piece of their own pie.

 

I actually knew of someone within my group of friends who wrote people requesting their autograph....just to sell it on ebay! I told him that was despicable.

 

I also have friends who attend every comic or horror "convention" to stand in line for their autographs. Wow, real fun.

 

This is why all my autographs are signed "To Soo" when I met that person....I want them to know it's not 'to sell', but for myself to remember their performance.

Still, I lose interest having "things", I much prefer the memory, the performance. You don't get that from waiting in line with 500 other schlubs.

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> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}

>

> This is why all my autographs are signed "To Soo" when I met that person....I want them to know it's not 'to sell', but for myself to remember their performance.

> Still, I lose interest having "things", I much prefer the memory, the performance. You don't get that from waiting in line with 500 other schlubs.

 

 

Yes, good for the economy, I guess... And I was merely passing along a news item with some current going rates... I know it's nothing new...

Suppose collecting autographs can be a hobby like any hobby, whether it's collecting post cards, stamps, coins, butterflies, plant specimens, you name it...

Whatever makes people happy, I guess...

 

As for the comment about having to wait in line, makes me think of that scene in "The Wrestler" where some retired wrestlers are congregated at an autograph and memorabilia show in a small town and hardly anybody shows up to pay for autographs or buy memorabilia...

That's the other side, I guess, when nobody cares and you can't give away your autograph for free...

 

Edited by: RMeingast on Aug 27, 2012 9:04 AM

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I have no trouble with celebrities charging for their autographs, especially in these times of eBay, where those who accquire the autographs are likely going to try and sell them for a good amount of money. In fact, a celebrity charging a high price for his autograph might help squelch the eBay trade.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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IMHO that's ridiculous. Most of the autographed photos I have are all Star Trek and Dark Shadows actors, all of whom lovingly sign for their fans (at least when I got them). I've only ever paid for pre-autographed photos three times, sold by dealers in the memorabilia rooms.

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When I went to see Michael Palin (of Monty Python) 5 years ago at the Philadelphia Free Library where he discussed his new book, he was available afterward to autograph books purchased at the event. I marveled at how his handlers roped us into the line, told folks when they could advance in queue, opened each book for him to a precise page (different one depending on the book you'd purchased) so that he could sign using a Sharpie provided for him. We were told (bullhorn style) that Mr. Palin also would sign "only one" additional item that we'd brought from home but that he was unavailable to converse or to answer questions during the autographing. I'd brought my "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" (1995) DVD, which he autographed.

 

 

It was quite an efficient assembly line. I thought the collection of books were pricey, so I only bought one. I put another on my amazon.com wishlist for a future purchase. I checked the other day and it's being sold for one cent.

 

 

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