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why is Napoleon so rare


TCMfan23
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It's not so rare...I saw it theatrically back in the mid-80's (Coppola produced the restoration)...and it HAS been out on video on VHS and laserdisc from Universal, which released the restoration. Problem is a few years ago there was a British restoration to the longer 5 hour length...but that version can't be shown in the U.S. because Coppola has U.S. rights to the film, and seemingly only wants HIS version shown which has his father Carmine's score for the movie.

 

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napoleon1927-1986laserdisc.jpg

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*Napoleon* is an amazing film. I saw it at Radio City Music Hall around 1980, with a live orchestra conducted by Carmine Coppola. At the screening the night before, from the stage of Radio City, they telephoned Abel Gance in Paris.

 

I later saw the film in London (albeit on television), with the score by Carl Davis (a native New Yorker). However, I prefer the Coppola score. I felt that he incorporated French classical music with his own compositions very effectively. I recall not liking Davis's score as much, though I do like his work. I would like to see a DVD set with every conceivable permutation of this extraordinary movie. One of my five top films.

 

 

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I got the low res shorter (if that's the word) version on Ebay a few years back. Love that early experimentation with widescreen at the end called *Polyvision* which were 3 cameras set up merged into 1 long screen.

 

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Polyvision on the big screen :)

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Polyvision camera setup during filming.

Napoleon_Polyvision_550h.jpg

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You didn't got that one did you? TCMfan23 was laughing at the fact that the dessert is hard to find (like the movie). I never recalled seeing it in any of my local stores.

 

Guess we have to make it ourselves. Might make a good episode of Master Chef but probually be Gordon Ramsay's Waterloo.

 

http://www.dianasdesserts.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/recipes.recipeListing/filter/dianas/recipeID/3084/Recipe.cfm

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}You didn't got that one did you? TCMfan23 was laughing at the fact that the dessert is hard to find (like the movie). I never recalled seeing it in any of my local stores.

My comment was based on the fact he didn't respond to my info I supplied that it had been on video, after he said it never was. I "got" that one just fine. ;

 

I've always recalled seeing Napoleon in video stores...you must have lived in a small town. ;)

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Thanks for the support, hamradio.

 

I think I understand how UniversalHorror felt...he provided some serious and helpful information about a great film. I posted a pictue of a dessert. I got a response, and he didn't.

I've "been there" myself, taken the time and thought to write a carefully written opinion on a subject, only to have the very next post be a goofy photo or something that has little to do with the original topic, never mind my post.

 

I must admit, I have trouble resisting puns and other kinds of play here. But I never meant to "derail" or cause U.H.'s interesting post about Abel Gance's film to be overlooked.

 

If it does any good, I can connect the two. Apparently Napolean ( the military conqueror, not the film) "invented" the dessert, or at least, liked it so much when some chef prepared it for him that he requested it often, and it came to be associated with him.

 

( the recipe you posted the link to looks far too difficult for me.)

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I've "been there" myself, taken the time and thought to write a carefully written opinion on a subject, only to have the very next post be a goofy photo or something that has little to do with the original topic, never mind my post.

 

Then don't be disappointed. Just tell yourself that you expressed yourself so well that there was nothing anyone could add. You may not get any pats on the back, but even a lack of those can be a good thing. It will spare you from being lumped in with "the clique" that others often imagine is a conspiracy against them.

 

Not that such conspiracies can't exist, but I think they're far less prevalent than presumed.

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> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}It will spare you from being lumped in with "the clique" that others often imagine is a conspiracy against them.

>

> Not that such conspiracies can't exist, but I think they're far less prevalent than presumed.

Absolutely...once in awhile some have complained about a "clique" here...I don't believe there is any such thing. Only individuals, not a group.

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There's another site that I frequent where someone is constantly derailing threads, complaining that no one ever talks about what he wants to talk about, and he goes on to insult individuals one-by-one, then lumps them into a clique.

 

It's just a like-minded group who have come to realize that this is a poster to avoid, and if he wants to discuss something, maybe he should initiate a thread about the subject. But no, despite my suggesting that - as well as several others - it's easier to get attention by claiming that everyone is against him.

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Ham, if you ever watched an episode of Food Network's "Chopped", you'll notice in the dessert round, the making of Napoleons is so common, the judges are getting sick of them.

 

 

I've had a VHS copy of *Napoleon* for some time now. Had to have it after reading Kevin Brownlow's book about the search for all the film, and the efforts to have it shown. THAT ALONE I always thought would make a good movie! I saw it at Dertroit's Ford Auditorium in '80 with a live orchestra and Coppola conducting too. BLEW. ME. AWAY.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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