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tonight is Mack Sennett night !


TCMfan23
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One of my favorite parts about watching these shorts is seeing what Los Angeles looked like 100 years ago !

 

In those early days before shooting permits, Sennett was notorious for taking his productions to the streets.

 

Supposedly, he once interrupted a military parade by handing Mabel Normand a "baby" and telling her to go find the "father" while the camera cranked.

 

 

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TCM thanks for showing "Laurel and Hardy - Laughing Gravy" (1931), I never seen it before. Very funny ending. Technical note: At the end you see Victor Recording and Western Electric. This film was released on both Vitaphone and sound on film (variable density format).

 

I also want to thank Oliver Hardy for NOT taking up singing as a career. I *pray* "You'll Be Sorry" won't be in my dreams tonight. :P

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Some of the shorts are starting 10 minutes late and 10 minutes early. I hope TCM fixes this problem before 11pm.

 

My 6 hour video tape will run out at 11pm. I have to switch tapes. I'm hoping to record all of 'Tillie's punctured romance'.

 

I should of got myself an 8 hour cassette. My DVR has failed to record the shorts because of the schedule problem. I added 10 minutes extra recording time to each short following "mabel's wedding" or whatever that short is called. X-(

 

Edited by: TCMfan23 on Sep 6, 2012 11:45 PM

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> {quote:title=musicalnovelty wrote:}{quote} Never mind all those conventions and political speeches being covered on the other channels. This is the only senate, I mean Sennett we want to see!

Good pun, musicalnovelty !

 

I noticed, in Ben's intro last night, that he said that Mack Sennett was Canadian .( Well, during the "formative years", anyway - till he was 17.) . Even I didn't know that.

 

Canadians have always excelled at comedy. It's one of our "things".

 

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That's TRUE, MissW! I ALWAYS laugh when I see William Shatner! ;)

 

 

Sadly, I only got to see *Tillie's Punctured Romance* , my interest only in it being MARIE DRESSLER'S film debut. The pre-"Little Tramp" appearances of Chaplin are interesting too. Also, weren't these shot in New York somewhere? I noticed the opening title cards gave New York as KEYSTONE PRODUCTIONS location.

 

 

You all could help me with something else. When I was a kid, all the silents seemed to be filmed at hyper speed. People and things seemed to move faster than normal. I read something somewhere that film cameras at the time recorded things at a slower speed than most film projectors later on could play them. It was supposed to be WHY they looked so hyper. With the advent of variable speed projectors later in the 20th century, we could finally see them at the proper speed. Don't know if this is all true, or if I'm REMEMBERING it all wrong.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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What you should really do with your DVR in an instance like this is to set it to begin a minute or two before the evening's programming begins, starting with the first film...and then just set it to run overtime for the entire evening to get everything. That's what I frequently do to make sure I catch all of a program or movie.

> {quote:title=TCMfan23 wrote:}{quote}

> My 6 hour video tape will run out at 11pm. I have to switch tapes. I'm hoping to record all of 'Tillie's punctured romance'.

>

> I should of got myself an 8 hour cassette.

>

Yes, you should *have* used a T160/8 hour tape and...as I described above for the DVR...just set it to record the entire evening for the full length of the tape.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}

>

> Canadians have always excelled at comedy. It's one of our "things".

>

That they do. You ought to try and read his autobiography "King of Comedy" which was published in 1954. I doubt it's in still in print, but you might find it at a larger public library. That's what I did recently. Hasn't been much demand for it though, the last time is was checked out prior to me was in 1976. :)

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I really enjoyed Mack Sennett night on TCM. It was educational and remarkable to see what Fort Lee, New Jersey and Los Angeles looked like in the early 1900s. The women's fashions: Hemlines to the ankles. Men and boys wearing hats. The transportation needs of America were still tied to horse carriages but horseless carriages were starting to make strides in taking over America. The streets were still dirt not asphalt or concrete. The prices at the eateries were remarkable and unbelievable: 10 cents will buy you a Chicken dinner, 25 cents a Roast Beef dinner.

 

Here is some trivia: Did anyone notice the trademark on the title cards or opening credits for the first four films which were broadcast? Mack Sennet's production company was called American Mutoscope & Biograph. If you take this company's trademark and think of the late Dick Clark you would have the trademark for "American Bandstand". http://www.imdb.com/company/co0066927/

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everything went well. it took a little work. that's all. i cancelled my dvr recordings and used the vcr in case the other vcr ran out of tape.

 

next week , i don't want to even think about it. tcm goofs up their schedule every once in a while when they run marathons. things can get messy when movies run 12 minutes long and no commercial break.

 

i don't really believe it's TCM's fault for the goof up , it's DirecTV's fault. They should've said "mack sennett films part 1 , part2 , etc instead of the title of each short in the guide.

 

i enjoyed 'tillie's punctured romance'. it's a been a while since i seen it. the funniest movie i've seen in a while.

 

 

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> {quote:title=thomasterryjr wrote:}{quote}I really enjoyed Mack Sennett night on TCM. It was educational and remarkable to see what Fort Lee, New Jersey and Los Angeles looked like in the early 1900s.

 

 

 

The glimpses of Hollywood in Tillie's Punctured Romance are SO cool because

they show some of the long-lost landmarks of silent movie-era Hollywood.

 

The house Tillie's uncle lives in and which she "inherits" . . .

 

NewPicture4.jpg

 

. . . was actually "Castle Sans Souci," a 23-room Tudor-Gothic mansion built

by one of Hollywood's pioneering real estate moguls, the very colorful Dr. A.G.

Schloesser.

 

SansSouci.jpg

 

Typical of moguls, he tore down his exquisite castle in 1928 to make way

for an apartment building.

 

It looks like Charlie and Mabel may have done some of their conspiring . . .

 

TillieLoc1.jpg

 

. . . on Hollywood Blvd.

 

TillieLoc4T.jpg

 

And it's hard to tell, but the "restaurant" they exited after snatching Tillie's purse . . .

 

TillieLoc3.jpg

 

. . . looks an awful lot like the veranda of the old Hollywood Hotel.

 

TillieLoc5.jpg

 

By the time Sennett shot Tillie, the hotel had been open for a decade and had

become a popular resort for east coast tourists who came for the warm winter

climate, exotic indigenous plants and, some perhaps, Hollywood's prohibition

of alcohol.

 

Where that gentleman is sitting and enjoying the dusty view of Hollywood Blvd. is

just about where the Dolby Theater, home of the Oscar broadcasts, stands today.

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I have to tell on myself a little. As I get older I tend to multitask way too much with the TV on.

 

I'm usually watching and playing with the tablet I'm using now.

 

It really doesn't work with silent films very well. I spend huge amounts of time rewinding.

 

Still, I never learn to just put the danged tablet down...

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lzcutter,

 

Thanks much for that link ! I LOVE Bengston's work so much that my copy of Silent

Echoes is practically rag-worn.

 

And having attempted a few of my own "Hollywood Before n' Afters," he must have

the patience of a saint ... and the fuel costs of a municipal bus line.

 

I mean, well-known landmarks are easy . . .

 

HWEMasonicTN_v1.jpg

 

But when all you've got to go on is a lousy fountain in a niche, it can take quite a while . . .

 

Edgemont_ThenNow_v1A.jpg

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