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3 Godfathers - a real depressing movie


TCMfan23
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> {quote:title=TCMfan23 wrote:

> }{quote}It was the first time I seen John Wayne cry in a movie. I remember there was a earlier version with Lewis Stone (Judge Hardy). Never seen it.

The one made in 1936 starred, in addition to Lewis Stone: Chester Morris and Walter Brennan.

Another sound version of the story that you may also see on TCM is HELL'S HEROES (1929) starring Charles Bickford, Raymond Hatton and Fred Kohler.

Both of those versions are also good and well worth checking out.

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There are at least six previous versions:

 

*Broncho Billy and the Baby* (1915)

*The Three Godfathers* (1916, with Harry Carey)

*Marked Men* (1919 - John Ford, with Harry Carey)

*Action* (1921 - John Ford, with Hoot Gibson)

*Hell's Heroes* (copyright in credits:1930, some sources cite it as a 1929 film, William Wyler)

*Three Godfathers* (1936, with Chester Morris, Walter Brennan and Lewis Stone)

 

The John Wayne version is titled as *3 Godfathers*, thus none of the cinema adaptations actually repeated the title letter-for-letter.

 

The 1970s TV version is called *The Godchild*.

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The 1936 Three Godfathers, directed by Richard Boleslawski, is by far the best. Chester Morris creates about the most despicable character in any movie. Hell's Heros, directed by William Wyler is a close second. Too bad you wasted your time on Ford's version. A waste of a lot of good talent and film stock.

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> {quote:title=slaytonf wrote:}{quote}

>

> The 1936 Three Godfathers, directed by Richard Boleslawski, is by far the best. Chester Morris creates about the most despicable character in any movie. Hell's Heros, directed by William Wyler is a close second. Too bad you wasted your time on Ford's version. A waste of a lot of good talent and film stock.

"By far the best..."

 

"A close second"

 

I'm all confused about that, although I do rate the two quite closely. I prefer the opening scenes to Wyler's film, some pre-Code lustiness in the bar scene that they couldn't do later. Either makes Ford's overly sentimental version rank far behind except for the fine cinematography.

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I wasn't debating your choice, just the words that got you there. I just bought the DVD set with the two versions and it is weird. I can watch one or the other and until I see the other one, the last one seen is my favorite.

 

 

"I wouldn't want to have to live on the difference" as John T. Chance says in RIO BRAVO.

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The only other version I saw was *Hell's Heroes* with Bickford. I too, thought it better than Wayne's version, AND more depressing. That's a large part of it's charm, actually.

 

 

Wouldn't mind seeing all the others.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

Aside: I don't know about any of you, but to ME, as Harry Carey Jr. got older, he looked more like BICKFORD'S son than Carey Sr.'s. Some of you clever pic posters might try a "side-by-side" display and get some other's opinions?

 

 

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> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}There are at least six previous versions:

>

> *Broncho Billy and the Baby* (1915)

> *The Three Godfathers* (1916, with Harry Carey)

> *Marked Men* (1919 - John Ford, with Harry Carey)

> *Action* (1921 - John Ford, with Hoot Gibson)

> *Hell's Heroes* (copyright in credits:1930, some sources cite it as a 1929 film, William Wyler)

> *Three Godfathers* (1936, with Chester Morris, Walter Brennan and Lewis Stone)

>

>

> The John Wayne version is titled as *3 Godfathers*, thus none of the cinema adaptations actually repeated the title letter-for-letter.

>

>

> The 1970s TV version is called *The Godchild*.

>

 

Clore,

 

Would you consider the JOHN FORD film 3 BAD MEN (1926) to be a different take on the Three Godfathers idea?

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Would you consider the JOHN FORD film 3 BAD MEN (1926) to be a different take on the Three Godfathers idea?

 

I wouldn't, only because the credits don't acknowledge the Peter Kyne original story. I have one very old book on silent films that refers to it as "Ford's original version" but I tend to think that was just sloppy research or a misguided conjecture based on the similar title.

 

It's a great film, perhaps my favorite of the silent Fords.

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