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New Oscar Host Named


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Fred C Dobbs Posted

 

What is Family Guy and who is Seth McFarlane.

 

You Tube and Wikipedia can help you with that question.

 

(However, Family Guy is very crass. I like it but it is what it is. Consider this some sort of warning.)

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>(However, Family Guy is very crass. I like it but it is what it is. Consider this some sort of warning.)

 

Thanks for the warning. I think I'll take a pass on this. :)

 

I suppose some of this stuff might be on broadcast TV, but I haven't watched any broadcast TV shows for a couple of decades, except for a couple of newscasts and some PBS shows. Nothing on ABC in 15 or 20 years. Petty much the same with NBC and CBS, and Fox broadcast too.

 

What show is that with the little animated kids that are completely round? All they do is look at the animation camera and curse. I've watched about 15 seconds of that show a couple of times.

 

Guys like me.... :) We are the reason the old broadcast channels no longer have audiences of 45 million viewers. They are down to around 8 to 15 million. Mainly poor uneducated people who can't afford sat or cable.

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I don't watch broadcast Fox, or ABC, or NBC, or CBS. I channel surf, going from the THIS TV movie channel, down through NBC, CBS, then Spanish PBS, then English PBS, then Fox, and around the circle again, sometimes flip, flip, flip, flip, flip. That's when there is nothing on any Cabel channel that I want to watch and when North by Northwest is playing on TCM. :)

 

But of course, I've got my big DVD backup file. :)

 

Sometimes I'm surprised. I find an unlabeled DVD, and I pop it in the viewer, and there are three or four movies on it that I don't remember recording, maybe a year ago or two years ago. I figure I must have recorded those in the middle of the night and forgot to label them and forgot I had them. This is usually a nice surprize, thanks to TCM showing some good old 1930s movies in the middle of the night. :)

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When we got our first TV in 1953, in Alabama, we had only 1 channel, NBC. That was it. And for several months we received all network shows a week late, on a kinescope film, which was basically a film of a live TV monitor. The AT&T broadcast network TV cable had not yet reached the city where we lived.

 

Six months later, our city got the cable, and we began receiving live shows for the first time. Then later a CBS channel was added. In big cities we visited, I noticed that there was a third channel, ABC.

 

And that?s all we had for many years, until the mid-1970s. We had a little PBS but so much of that was kids programming.

 

My wife and I saw some newspaper advertising in 1976 for a new cable service in San Francisco. It promised something like 8 to 10 channels, including a mostly all-old-movie channel out of Atlanta. Ha! WTBS. Some Southern guy named Ted Turner started it. So we signed up for it. About $5 a month. And I?ve been a Turner classic movie watcher since 1976. :)

 

Oh, back around 1956 I lived in a very small town in Mississippi that was about 80 miles from any TV station. And some guy in that town started a local cable service so we could get NBC, ABC, and CBS from those distant cities. There were no satellites in those days, and no telephone cable to that town. What the guy did was build a giant tall TV antenna tower, a receiving antenna, so he could pick up the channels in those distant cities with his tall antenna, then he gradually wired the town block by block, and we saw those channels from other cities. I think that was about $2.50 a month. About the same as the local telephone bill. :)

 

Network TV shows were better in those days. Lots of famous movie actors appeared in TV dramas and comedies. Hattie McDaniel had her own TV show. Judy Garland made a lot of TV appearances singing. Lots of famous movie actors hosted TV drama shows and occasionally starred in them. That was the Golden Age of network TV. Joanne Woodward started in TV dramas. Burt Reynolds too. Robert Redford. Clint Eastwood. J. Carrol Naish was Charlie Chan on TV for two years.

 

Take a look at this cast for a 1958 Playhouse 90 live TV show:

 

 

 

That's the type of show that took audiences away from movie theaters.

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> images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR54QFJEi8Jiuy7-sTTX7g

 

I second that motion, Queen V....

 

Don't understand this, is my first reaction? ?:|

 

I like MacFarlane, but have to scratch my head at this choice? :|

 

I know he hosted "Saturday Night Live" and had a hit movie this year (that I haven't seen and am not interested in)...

 

Maybe ABC is trying to connect with younger viewers?? Anyway, I don't really care as I don't watch the Oscars, so they must obviously want viewers other than me...

 

Lets see what this "Washington Post" article says:

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/tv-column/post/seth-macfarlane-to-host-the-academy-awards/2012/10/01/20d30b24-0be3-11e2-bd1a-b868e65d57eb_blog.html

 

So there it is:

 

 

"But the reason the film academy decided MacFarlane’s first appearance on Oscar’s stage should be as host, the academy made very clear in Monday’s announcement, is because MacFarlane’s flick “Ted” — which he directed, co-wrote, produced and “starred” in as the voice of plush-toy bear Ted — has brought in more than $420 million in worldwide box office, making it [one of the year’s highest-grossing films|http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/comic-riffs/post/ted-for-the-win-seth-macfarlane-comedy-wins-weekend-with-54m-debut/2012/07/02/gJQA7bDLGW_blog.html]. Producer NBC Universal owes thanks to repeat viewing by young guys.

 

 

 

Yes, the film academy is making another bid to bring younger viewers to its **** of trophy dispensing to the year’s brightest motion-picture luminaries."

 

 

This is what the Academy itself had to say (http://www.oscars.org/press/pressreleases/2012/20121001.html):

 

 

 

h2. SETH MacFARLANE TO HOST 85TH OSCARS®

BEVERLY HILLS, CA – Seth MacFarlane will host the 85th Academy Awards®, telecast producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron announced today. This will be MacFarlane's first appearance on Oscar's stage. The 85th Academy Awards will be broadcast live on Oscar® Sunday, February 24, on the ABC Television Network.

 

"We are thrilled to have Seth MacFarlane host the Oscars. His performing skills blend perfectly with our ideas for making the show entertaining and fresh," said Zadan and Meron. "He will be the consummate host, and we are so happy to be working with him."

 

 

"It's truly an overwhelming privilege to be asked to host the Oscars," said MacFarlane. "My thoughts upon hearing the news were, one, I will do my utmost to live up to the high standards set forth by my predecessors; and two, I hope they don't find out I hosted the Charlie Sheen Roast."

 

 

"Seth is unbelievably talented," said Academy President Hawk Koch. "We couldn't be happier with the creative team we've assembled. With Craig, Neil, and now Seth, we're off to a great start."

 

 

MacFarlane made his feature directorial debut this summer with the box office success "Ted. "He also co-wrote and produced the film, and voiced the title character. "Ted" has brought in over $420 million worldwide, making it one of the highest-grossing films of the year.

 

 

MacFarlane is the creative force behind the television series "Family Guy" and co-creator of "American Dad!" and "The Cleveland Show. "In September he hosted "Saturday Night Live" for the first time, for the show's 38th season premiere. An accomplished live performer, MacFarlane has played to sold-out audiences at London's Royal Albert Hall and New York's Carnegie Hall.In 2011 he released his debut album, "Music Is Better Than Words," which earned two Grammy® nominations. He also has earned 13 Emmy® nominations and won two for his work on "Family Guy."

 

 

Academy Awards for outstanding film achievements of 2012 will be presented on Sunday, February 24, 2013, at the Dolby Theatre™ at Hollywood & Highland Center®. Don Mischer will direct the telecast for the third consecutive time. The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in more than 225 countries worldwide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Fred, I also watch very little episodic TV. Currently I watch Doctor Who, Anthony Bourdain's No Reservations, and Masterpiece Mystery. In the past I have watched Carnivale, Six Feet Under, several Star Trek shows, The X Files, Babylon 5, and Ren and Stimpy. That's about it, from the 80s on. I have checked out popular shows, but don't care for them. Too much propaganda, too much like advertising, or too just plain mean.

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TV critic Tim Goodman weighs in on the idea of Seth McFarlane (whom I like, - I love Family Guy ) as Oscar host, why it may not be such a good idea and the problem with prevalent idea that awards shows like the Oscars and Emmys need a comic when what they need is a host.

 

Gotta say, I agree with him!

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RM, the trailer for Ted was as filthy as Family Guy. Mind you, some filthy is fine, but not when it is machine-gunned at you. That is what the youts prefer, it seems, according to those who think Seth is a good choice for the Oscars.

 

Fred, I remember those days. Television was golden and movies were classic. Days that are gone with the wind.

 

Oh well. La di da.

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The problem really isn't the crassness, crassness can be fine:

A. in moderation

B. when there is a nugget of truth beneath it or the person being crass isn't betraying a total contempt for humanity.

 

The problem is *that Seth MacFarlane is not funny AT ALL.* He merely strings a bunch of esoterica together, winks at us and presumes we'll all think it's a hoot because, oh, this guy knows about all kinds of far-off, unrelatable stuff that he throws together with a really obvious effort, *but there is nothing beneath it, no moral, no truth, no humor, no wit, NO NOTHING with the occasional exception of a base contempt for everyday people and humanity in general.*

 

To some degree, that's fine, and I understand, but it's *all that he is capable of doing* and it is something that HOLLYWOOD has had a real problem with for some time now (I personally pinpoint Fargo as the launch pad for the whole "we hate everyone and everywhere between NY and LA" movement in popular culture, but I know it's been going on far longer than that. It just seems a lot more open now.)

 

 

Family Guy is the absolute *NADIR* of modern culture. If any of you doubt this, may I suggest you check out a recent episode WHEREIN A WOMAN GETS THE CRAP BEATEN OUT OF HER BY HER HUSBAND FOR ABOUT THREE UN-INTERRUPTED MINUTES RIGHT NEXT TO A ROOM FULL OF PEOPLE AND IT IS MEANT TO BE FUNNY. In fact, that entire episode is a depiction of a violent, abusive marriage that is supposed to be funny. As in "hah-hah" funny. As in "we suggest, nay openly, force you to LAUGH at this."

 

 

Nadir.

NADIR!

 

 

ps- hope you all think abortion jokes are a riot.

pss- AIDS jokes too.

psss- and mocking the handicapped too.

pssss- Everliving, MotherF***ING NADIR - see there, there's an example of crassness with a hint of truth behind it.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Oct 2, 2012 7:48 AM

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:}{quote}

>

> The problem is *that Seth MacFarlane is not funny AT ALL.* To some degree, that's fine, and I understand, but it's *all that he is capable of doing* and it is something that HOLLYWOOD has had a real problem with for some time now (I personally pinpoint Fargo as the launch pad for the whole "we hate everyone and everywhere between NY and LA" movement in popular culture, but I know it's been going on far longer than that. It just seems a lot more open now.)

>

 

The humour is very low-brow - below "Three Stooges" level?- but it is popular.

And ABC appears to want to attract younger viewers.

The same younger viewers who make all the terrible reality TV shows so popular.

The same younger viewers who liked the "Jackass" movies.

The same younger viewers who seem to be the primary focus audience of Hollywood.

It's all about making money. Ratings equal money and that's why you have someone like MacFarlane as host. Interesting thing will be if he lasts? Will people in future scratch their heads when they see MacFarlane hosted Oscars?? "MacFarlane, who was that?"

 

Oh well, I don't watch the Oscars anyway, so ABC is obviously not interested in me or many of the people on this message board as potential audience.

 

Again, I like MacFarlane, he has a nice singing voice and obviously has potential for better things. Only time will tell...

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All true, Addison. In the very beginning, the shock of the show was engaging. Then, like porn, it became tiresome and unfunny. But it kept on, getting more and more and more abusive and shocking. And, since it is a cartoon, it could do anything it wanted.......and did, because it had the audience it wanted, the same audience that TCM hopes to get with movies like Evil Under The Sun (poor TCM), and there were no holds barred.

 

And now, the proof that money is king is the Oscar Academy, the same organization that was so elegant in the 20th century, has now invited filth to be the host. And the audience of stahs will laugh at him.

 

And no doubt give him a standing ovation for his singing.

 

Hey, you want another example of the 21st century? Catch Aaaaaaaaanold's interview. The man's a pig.

 

Oh well. I'm glad I'm a dinosaur.

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> {quote:title=RMeingast wrote:}{quote}

> 1. The humour is very low-brow - below "Three Stooges" level?- but it is popular.

>

> 2. And ABC appears to want to attract younger viewers.The same younger viewers who make all the terrible reality TV shows so popular.The same younger viewers who liked the "Jackass" movies.

>

>

>

>

>

> 3. Again, I like MacFarlane, he obviously has potential for better things. Only time will tell...

>

1. The Three Stooges did not- to the best of my recollection- participate (often?) in violence against women nor did they have a constant, almost compulsive need to make racial sterotypes, spit in the face of all people everywhere, or throw a bunch of random non-sequitor concepts into a cutaway bit that they thought was funny because...well, just because. There is also a sliver of a chance that you could find occasional irony, truth or a moral in Three Stooges shorts. It's been a looooong time since I've seen The Three Stooges, but I also dare to say that I recall at least letting the occasional titter escape whilst watching The Three Stooges.

 

I have never so much as cracked a smile whilst watching Family Guy.

 

2. Oh, you mean *the same younger viewers who are causing the Oscars to become even more obsolete than they already were* ? I get what you mean by this and I agree with you, but I have to point out that it is a delicious, cold-water spin cycle of irony that Family Guy itself would never even conceive of depicting because it's just too deep.

 

 

3. It's been 12 years. It only gets worse.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Oct 2, 2012 8:30 AM

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:

>

> }{quote}1. The Three Stooges did not- to the best of my recollection- participate (often?) in violence against women nor did they have a constant, almost compulsive need to make racial sterotypes, spit in the face of all people everywhere, or throw a bunch of random non-sequitor concepts into a cutaway bit that they thought was funny because...well, just because. There is also a sliver of a chance that you could find occasional irony, truth or a moral in Three Stooges shorts. It's been a looooong time since I've seen The Three Stooges, but I also dare to say that I recall at least letting the occasional titter escape whilst watching The Three Stooges.

>

> I have never so much as cracked a smile whilst watching Family Guy.

>

> 2. Oh, you mean *the same younger viewers who are causing the Oscars to become even more obsolete than they already were* ? I get what you mean by this and I agree with you, but I have to point out that it is a delicious, cold-water spin cycle of irony that Family Guy itself would never even conceive of depicting because it's just too deep.

>

>

> 3. It's been 12 years. It only gets worse.

>

 

 

Yes, don't disagree with you Witless... And good point about irony of MacFarlane hosting a show that his animated TV characters (and movie character?) would totally deride and mock in the crudest way. But money talks and MacFarlane listens. He has his eyes on a big movie career now, possible acting in films as well as making more of them as director, producer, etc....

And there are many Hollywood people who started out doing crap and then did better stuff, before doing crap again. You know what I mean.

Eddie Murphy, for example, started out as a very foul-mouthed comedian and now does kids movies... Jim Carrey started out doing the outrageous comedy thing too before going serious and trying drama (with attempts at humour)...

You know what I mean...

And me don't really care as I don't watch Oscars on TV...

There are so many awards shows these days, what's the diff.??

And "dumbing down" to bottom trawling for an audience just makes it worse. Oh well...

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