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ot : what is the difference between DVD-R and DVD +R


classiccinemafan
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I asked and asked the question many times , but no one seems to give me a answer that's understanding. I've used both and noticed no difference. But I'm trying to get my DVDs to play on other machine , bt they just won't play. Then I read somewhere online that you need to finalize the discs. I have no idea what that means. I've been using tapes until a few years ago when I bought my first DVD Recorder.

 

The things I want to know:

difference between -r and +r

and how to finalize

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> {quote:title=classiccinemafan wrote:}{quote}I asked and asked the question many times , but no one seems to give me a answer that's understanding. I've used both and noticed no difference. But I'm trying to get my DVDs to play on other machine , bt they just won't play. Then I read somewhere online that you need to finalize the discs. I have no idea what that means. I've been using tapes until a few years ago when I bought my first DVD Recorder.

>

> The things I want to know:

> difference between -r and +r

> and how to finalize

I am sorry to tell you this, but you will not be able to understand any answer that is sufficient to cover this technologically complex subject. I understand this subject very well and am involved with it on a daily basis. However, I do not know any way to answer your questions in a manner that will make any sense to one with the background that you project in your questioning. Your best answer is to try to find a friend who can work with you in your home environment to show you how to get from step A to step B to step C, etc. In short, you need personal, on-the-spot tutoring.

 

This forum is not the right place to give you what you need.

 

 

musikone

 

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> {quote:title=classiccinemafan wrote:}{quote}But I'm trying to get my DVDs to play on other machine , bt they just won't play. Then I read somewhere online that you need to finalize the discs. I have no idea what that means.

That's exactly what it means: Finalize means to make them compatible so they will play on ANY machine...if they're not finalized, they will only play on the machine you recorded on.

 

Musikone is right...you need to get a friend to help you directly in your home with your problem and question. Online is not the right place to ask, partly because no one can see or know exactly HOW your particular DVD recorder works.

 

If you've been unable to get this to work since you got the recorder, you also need to read over your owner's manual on how to use the machine. That's a generally good starting place.

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Mine is a phillips. With disc in push stop button. Press Setup. Select disc edit. Ok. Select finalizing. Yes. It will take a few minutes. On mine you can watch the bars go across. On mine it does not make any difference if its +R or minus R.

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but you will not be able to understand any answer that is sufficient to cover this technologically complex subject....I do not know any way to answer your questions in a manner that will make any sense to one with the background that you project in your questioning.

 

Oh, snap.

 

{quote:title=classiccinemafan, search on the name 'talkietime' and ask your questions of him. He is very nice, very patient, and if he is still here, will most likely help you.

 

Me, I just threw everything out. Imagine what, ahem, some would say to that?}{quote}

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On all my recorders, once I finish recording something if I push the 'Eject', 'Open/Close' button the machine will ask if I want to finalize the disk before 'ejecting' it. At that point I can either finalize the disk immediately of finalize at some later time. As far as DVDR and DVD-R, in my machines, the DVDR disk need to be formatted before writting and they will record about 5% more that the selected time (If I'm recording something in the 2 hour speed, it will record about 2 hours and maybe an additional 6 minutes). DVD-R doesn't need to be formatted and doesn't give much more than the time selected (a 2 hour recording will do 2 hours and maybe an additional 20 or 30 seconds).

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No big mystery. DVD-R and DVDR are two different formats. They can only be recorded on once. DVD-RW and DVDRW discs can be erased and recorded on over and over. They are more expensive though. But they will work on your macchine. Some DVD-Recorders will only record on one format or the other. Most will accept both. All will play back both providing the disc is already finalized.

 

It should tell you in the instruction manual how to finalize the disc. Why do people hate to have to read the directions for anything these days? There is nothing complex about it. If you keep recording until you run out of space, the disc generally will finalize automatically.

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DVD-R is the original recordable format, and is more universally compatible with other players. But, any player made in the last 5 years should play both formats with no problem.

 

DVD+R was invented by Philips, and others, who didn't want to pay royalties to use DVD-R. Supposedly, it has slightly better error correction.

 

In my Pioneer DVDRs, both types of discs can hold about 2 hrs 7min of SP recording. But, YMMV.

 

About the only real differences you will find are these: different brands of players are optimized for one, or the other. For instance, my Pio DVDRs are optimized for -R, and their fast forward speed is much faster for -R than it is for +R.

 

The other thing is that most media these days is cheap crap, that will go bad, and become unplayable. The best blank media is made by Taiyo Yuden, available on line. It is very reliable. For some reason, their -R media is somewhat cheaper than their +R media.

 

Probably all DVDRs made in the last 5 years will record on either format. However, some DVDRs can make bit-for-bit copies of burned discs. To do this, you will have to use the same format disc that the original was made on.

 

Finalizing - as others have said, consult your manual! It's not that difficult. One would have to be familiar with your DVDR to tell you how.

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> {quote:title=classiccinemafan wrote:}{quote}

> The things I want to know:difference between -r and +r and how to finalize

 

Others have said well the difference between the formats.

 

I will endeavor to find specific information on formatting for you if you will post the brand and model of DVD recorder you possess.

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> {quote:title=MovieMadness wrote:}{quote}I think DVD +R has an extra couple of minutes of record time over the -R.

 

Possibly, depending on your DVDR. On my Pioneer 640 and 650, recording times are the same, about 127m. I know that the new Magnavox DVDRs get more like 133m on a disc in SP, but I don't know if it's both formats, or one or the other.

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To all who may be concerned:

 

Having replied to classiccinemafan's question, WHO among you concerned individuals is now going to step up and ask her/him whether or not she/he *understands* your "answer"? Perhaps you will all notice that she/he has not shown her/his face here since that first plea for help. This is a predictable repeat of the circumstances following past attempts by other brave souls to get answers to this very same question -- with a flood of "answers" by the very same individuals, who themselves do not understand what the essence of answering such a question as that posed by classiccinemafan is all about: REALITY.

 

Do you suppose this means that she/he is now satisifed and will go about her/his business of recording on -R or +R DVDs, fully aware of the difference between the two? Really?

 

 

musikone

 

 

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> {quote:title=MovieMadness wrote:}{quote}You have a setting in your DVR Recorder that finalizes the dics that you make, you have to do that to get them to play on other players. Look in the owners maual on how to do it as it depends on your system and each one had a different way to do it.

 

 

 

 

An important word about finalizing. Many people don't bother doing it because they say "I only play it on the recorder I made it on and and never loan them out." This is a big mistake. If anything ever happens to that recorder, it's very possible that those discs will be useless.

 

I had a neighbor who did that and when his recorder broke, he could not find another that could finalize them. I tried three that I had with no luck. He went out and bought one of the same brand and that didn't work. It turned out that the brand had been sold and the newer recorders were being made by a different company.

 

After three months of searching and by pure luck, I found a used recorder just like his on e-bay. Of course, it cost three times what a new one would have, but at least he saved his 900 disc collection.

 

So the moral of my story is to take a few minutes and finalize each disc after it's been recorded.

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> {quote:title=musikone wrote:}{quote}

> To all who may be concerned:

>

> Having replied to classiccinemafan's question, WHO among you concerned individuals is now going to step up and ask her/him whether or not she/he *understands* your "answer"? ....

>

> Do you suppose this means that she/he is now satisifed and will go about her/his business of recording on -R or +R DVDs, fully aware of the difference between the two? Really?

>

> musikone

>

 

My answer was specific, and non-technical. It is you who seem to think it must be complicated. The shortest answer is that there is almost no difference, and someone said THAT, too. As to finalizing, no one can answer that, without knowing what exact recorder the OP has. But, several have said to refer to the manual, which is the only practical advice one can give. If I had to guess, I'd say that the OP no longer has the manual.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}

> If I had to guess, I'd say that the OP no longer has the manual.

 

It is fortunate that many companies are now making the manuals for their equipment available on-line. It is possible that if the original poster will supply the brand name and model of their recorder that I might be able to locate the manual as a pdf file or in a ftp index.

 

I was amused that the manual for a DVD player was provided on a DVD and not as a printed volume. I believe the sections were wasted of how to set up the unit and how to troubleshoot it if it did not work.

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Many companies ALSO no longer print their manuals out...the include them as a PDF on a CD-ROM included with the equipment. The new stereo system I got recently only came with a disc of the manuals....no printed disc. It's obviously more cost-effective to do it that way than to go through a lot of paper printing them. Some pieces of equipment, probably more likely recorders and such...have the manuals and Help built INTO the machine as part of the programming, and come with no other manual of sorts.

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You are correct about finalizing DVD's. They won't work in other players/recorders even if from the same company unless its the exact model.

 

But also be aware that one should make certain that the movie and disc labeling has been done and is there room for another recording. Once finalizing has been done, you cannot record or make changes to the disc.

 

I like my DVD's to look professional as possible.

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> Once finalizing has been done, you cannot record or make changes to the disc.

 

I do not like the way all of our DVD recorders will not delete an unused portion. When you record a one-hour-and-forty-minute movie under the two-hour recording time you must record in the remaining twenty-minute portion and then delete it or it will show there are two items on that disk even although one of them is blank space which can not be viewed.

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> {quote:title=SonOfUniversalHorror wrote:}{quote}

> Some pieces of equipment, probably more likely recorders and such...have the manuals and Help built INTO the machine as part of the programming, and come with no other manual of sorts.

 

Such are completely useless when there is a problem with initial set-up or display problems or any other problem wherein you can not see a clear picture.

 

It is useless also to have a manual on a DVD when the problem you must solve is why the unit will not properly load a disc.

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> {quote:title=SansFin wrote:}{quote}

> I do not like the way all of our DVD recorders will not delete an unused portion. When you record a one-hour-and-forty-minute movie under the two-hour recording time you must record in the remaining twenty-minute portion and then delete it or it will show there are two items on that disk even although one of them is blank space which can not be viewed.

 

That is a quirk of some DVD recorders, including Magnavox and Philips, IIRC. Not so with Pioneers or Panasonics. But, they are no longer made.

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I like to mention the DVD-RAM format. It has the advantage of not having to be finalized but one has to be careful when playing in other players. After each recording, make certain to lock the individual recordings as well as the disc itself before placing in other recorders.

 

I was lucky to learn this early on. I have a DVD-RAM that had a couple of recordings on it and when I placed it in a different recorder, it wrote some info to the disc. The disc will now ONLY play on that recorder, NOT in the other where I did the first recordings. It tells me the disc is unformatted. Sure didn't expect that!

 

I now lock all my DVD-RAMs (the few I have) and only unlock when making recordings but only in the same recorder.

 

Panasonic_16x_DVD-RAM.jpg

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I don't know the 'technical' difference of the plus or minus type dvdr, but I have been saving old movies on vhs since the 70's, and when I got my 1st vhs to dvd recorder to transfer my vhs collection to dvds, I was told by many movie fans I trade titles with that I should ONLY use the dvd-r type of blank dvds when making dvds because they play better universally while the dvd+r are known to have issues with playback on some systems. So that is all I ever use. As far as 'finalizing' goes it is a very important step, it is what 'finishes' a dvd recording so that it can be played on any playback system. My dvd recorder remote has a button called 'setup', that when I finish recording I click on and it shows the options General Setting, Timer Programming, Title List & Disc Edit. First I click on Title List and then 'edit' to type in the title of the movie I have just transferred and finish that. Then I click on Disc Edit, and it asks if you are ready to finalize your disc, and I then do that. Your user manual should have a description of your remote buttons and which to use to accomplish the same things I'm describing. When I 1st started making dvds because I could view them fine right after recording I did not bother with finalizing, did not understand what it even was, but then when I sent a few movies to cousins in another state and they would not play on their laptops or dvd players one of my cousins asked me if I had 'finalized' the movies and explained it all to me, so it is very important. Hope this helps some :)

 

Edited by: sunny_shines on Oct 11, 2012 10:35 AM

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