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Anyone else dig on SHADOW OF DOUBT?


markbeckuaf
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I absolutely grooved to this 1935 mystery/comedy!!! I'd seen it a LONG time ago on TCM and haven't seen it show up again in ages, and really dug it the second time around! The interplay between my main man Edward Brophy as a police investigator and Constance Collier is priceless!!! Both are awesome throughout!! Always a sucker for old school mysteries, this is a fun one from MGM!!

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That night last week was a great night and early morning. I was lucky enough to record SON OF FURY, SHADOW OF DOUBT, THE WOMEN IN HIS LIFE, and SINGAPORE WOMAN.

 

SHADOW OF DOUBT was an MPPDA Code film, #586, meaning it was probably made in late 1934 and released in early 1935. The MPPDA logo was a very large full-screen title at the beginning of the film. They used big titles like that for about a year, while promoting the publicity about the new Decency Code for major Hollywood films.

 

THE WOMEN IN HIS LIFE was a pre-code film from 1933. Otto Kruger was great in this one. Very interesting plot and last-minute ending.

 

Brenda Marshall was really great in SINGAPORE WOMAN (1941), and it is a very unusual and interesting film. She plays both a bad girl and a good girl in this film, which was some fine acting. Sort of a two-faces-of-Eve type film. She married William Holden shortly after finishing this film.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> SHADOW OF DOUBT was an MPPDA Code film, #586, meaning it was probably made in late 1934 and released in early 1935.

Good figuring, Fred!

SHADOW OF DOUBT was filmed between December 22, 1934 and January 11, 1935.

The MPPDA Number (586) was assigned on January 28, 1935.

The movie was copyrighted on February 12, 1935.

It was released on February 15, 1935.

 

Additional fact:

The novel upon which the movie was based was published as a serial in Collier's Magazine between October 13, 1934 and January 5, 1935.

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I was not familiar with the older lady who was in SHADOW OF DOUBT. She is Constance Collier. I looked her up and I found out she was a famous stage actress in the 1890s and early 20th Century.

 

She played Cleopatra, Lady Macbeth, and many other famous roles:

 

constance_cleo.jpg

 

index.php?id=th-03899&t=w

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:

> }{quote}I was not familiar with the older lady who was in SHADOW OF DOUBT. She is Constance Collier. I looked her up and I found out she was a famous stage actress in the 1890s and early 20th Century.

>

> She played Cleopatra, Lady Macbeth, and many other famous roles:

>

> constance_cleo.jpg

>

> index.php?id=th-03899&t=w

 

 

 

That's one serious-looking lady!

I think I'll stay out of her way when she's holding a long sharp spear!

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Constance Collier was a great friend of Kate Hepburn's. I've read many of Collier's letters to Kate, which are housed in an archive in NYC. Collier was also a great acting coach. One of her famous film roles was as the older woman in Stage Door. I believe that, when Ms. Collier died, her personal assistant -- the famous "Phyllis," went to work for Ms. Hepburn.

 

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Fred -

 

SHADOW OF DOUBT and SINGAPORE WOMAN were two of the great ones this week. These are exactly the kind of movies that absolutely make TCM for me.

 

I can really get into a breezy hour long B picture. Usually the stories are very entertaining with pretty good writing. Even when the scripts are lacking the casts are peppered with great character actors that still make the whole thing really enjoyable for me.

 

The relationship between Constance Collier and Edward Brophy in SHADOW OF DOUBT was marvelous.

 

I consider these movies the hidden gems of the TCM library.

 

Maybe one month TCM could pick a night where they salute B pictures. No film longer than 65 minutes!

 

Yancey

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I think THREE ON A MATCH is one of the best short films ever made, at 63 minutes.

 

It is a B picture, I suppose, but it has Joan Blondell, Bette Davis, Ann Dvorak, Anne Shirley, Warren William, Edward Arnold, and Humphrey Bogart. Not only is the cast great, but the script is very good too.

 

It's about 3 girls in junior high school who have different personalities, and we see them grow up and they all turn out differently from what we would expect. It is a very interesting story. I've seen it many times.

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