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Me and My Gal


ArchieCarstairs
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So far, the only part that interested me was the spoof of STRANGE INTERLUDE. Otherwise, far too much unfunny comic relief and no story for us from which to be relieved. I saw this years ago at a revival house and thought it lacking, I was hoping that my first impression was in error, but if anything, I'm even less pleased with it this time.

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>I disagree. I think this is the best Spencer Tracy movie I've ever seen.

 

Shirley, you are joking.

 

This was the worst 1930s movie ever made.

 

I'm glad I saw it once. That means I'll never have to see it again.

 

Thank you TCM for showing it. :)

 

--------------------------------

 

PS: That movie had 7 writers.

 

All it needed was 1 good one.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0023202/fullcredits#writers

 

Edited by: FredCDobbs on Oct 1, 2012 7:50 PM

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I always liked it save the annoying drunk that just won't go away. There's a lot of these guys in Prohibition era movies. Did the public think it was funny because here's a guy, obviously drunk and not very bright, who is easily getting his hands on liquor when it's supposed to be illegal?

 

It is a bit goofy the way most pre-Zanuck Fox films are, like Fox didn't ever really know what kind of movie they were trying to make. It makes you wonder how the studio survived until 1935 when Zanuck bought it. And yet William Fox almost bought MGM in 1929.

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I thought the "Strange Interludes" parody was hilarious. I wish that scene would have lasted longer. I was hoping the drunk fisherman would wonder onto a ship and be taken away and not seen or heard of ever again.

 

By far the best part of this film was seeing Constance Bennent shaking her lovely derriere in the camera before the "Strange Interludes" parody. That got my attention. Reminded me of Thelma Todd in "This Is the Night" having her dress torn off twice and almost a third time.

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I totally dug this flick!!! Very glad TCM aired it as I hadn't seen it before! It rocked! Joan was hotcha-cha-cha, Spence was...well...Spence....and Marion Burns was sexy as heck!!! Loved the way this film moved from comedy to crime drama of sorts, but still was kinda all over the place! I love how flix from this early era didn't always follow straight genre lines.

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

> That's funny, Fred, considering that Osborne related that TRACY HIMSELF thought his *Dante's Inferno* was the worst movie ever made.

>

> Sepiatone

>

 

Yow! I don't know why Tracy would say that. *Dante's Inferno* is an excellent film. I was stunned the first time I saw it, and have still been impressed with it in later viewings. Perhaps Tracy just didn't like the surreal and hallucinatory stuff in films. Besides being entertaining, it has impressive visuals of a time gone by, and an important message. What more can one ask of a film?

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I liked it too, Valentine. I don't know about excellent, but a pretty good offering, to say the least. I was impressed with Tracy's performance, especially the scene in which he, after becoming rich and powerful, was in his office talking hard and gruffly to his assistant and people on the phone. Then the old guy who ran the burger stand walked in and Carter's whole countenence softened abrubtly until the old guy left, then back to being the hard-guy bastard. That switch in characteristics is hard to do in natural life, let alone a film performance.

 

 

I think Tracy objected to the subject matter more than anything else. Being a strongly devoted Catholic, it probably was offensive to many of his sensibilities. But also being a consumate professional, went ahead and finished it anyway.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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I didn't like the film either. Fortunately, I had recorded it on DVR, and with the aid of my trusty remote, I was able to reduce the viewing time substantially.

 

The scenes with the drunk were indeed useless, and they went on and on...

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I would say it was about even. Joan was in around 70 movies and so was Constance but as noted Constance was popular in the 30s, especially the early 30s, but really started to fade in the 40s, especially after WWII, while 6 years younger sister Joan started off in the mid 30s and really took off in the 40s and post WWII noirs, and than in the 50s in mother roles.

 

Two very different careers but two very nice gals in their own way.

 

Second best set of actress sisters. Olivia Dehavilland and Joan Fontaine being tops in my book.

 

 

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