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Jekyll/Hyde


Dothery
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I saw the Fredric March version. Absolutely great acting as Hyde. As Jekyll, March was being himself ... quiet, elegant, gentlemanly ... as he was in life. I met him once and he impressed me as being that person. But as Hyde! Unbelievable. I had always wondered why he won the Academy Award for it, but that was before I saw it.

 

His womanizing reputation has always seemed odd to me in light of his public persona. I couldn't quite reconcile the ideas, even though I had read stories by unimpeachable sources, stars who had worked with him, about his legendary prowess. But I see now how he did it. I think he WAS two people.

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You're a Hollywood star in a 7 year contract going from one bad movie to the next identical bad movie.. what else is there to do but get drunk & womanize. Your job sucks, youre bored to tears - you need to have a little fun & blow off steam. A Hollywood actors life was an unhappy one. March was exactly Norman Maine.

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> {quote:title=joyrider wrote:}{quote}You're a Hollywood star in a 7 year contract going from one bad movie to the next identical bad movie.. what else is there to do but get drunk & womanize. Your job sucks, youre bored to tears - you need to have a little fun & blow off steam. A Hollywood actors life was an unhappy one. March was exactly Norman Maine.

 

Is there something bothering you? I can't agree that March went from one bad movie to another. And I don't think anyone said he was a drunk, as you imply.

 

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Why do you think they made A STAR IS BORN? Because that is exactly what every star goes through. Norman Maine is your typical male star. If you want to believe fairy tales be my guest. Hollywood is A STAR IS BORN. Every word of the movie is true. Primitive people believe the camera steals your soul. There is some truth to that.

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Hollywood was set up to control the information in the world. An attempt was made for a total bank takeover in the 20's. Rumors got out & a detective was hired to get the info. a female was used & she got a bankster drunk at the Ambassador Hotel & he spilled the beans. Very soon after United Artists was formed to supercede the takeover. Chaplin was blamed as the ringleader & the banks had to wait until the late 20's to do it.. The advent of sound gave them their big chance & the banks financed the high cost of sound technology by crashing the stockmarket. All real wealth was removed leaving worthless paper. And the depression allowed a large & desperate employee base. Then the studios were retooled & 7 year contracts were imposed & assembly line methods utilised. Chaplin made fun of it in Modern Times but the banksters went for revenge. Creating phony crimes Chaplin was tried & acquitted of all charges. But the strain made him leave the USA. Any filmaker in any country that was any good was brought to Hollywood & placed under their control. This continues to this day. Citizen Kane was an anomaly that was severely punished. As you can see now each major studio became mobbed up with corporation backers so that today you have a very few sources that disseminate news. The movies business has become meaningless. ]:) Like my RKO Story you will not see this story told in this way.

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So the great depression of the late '20's and '30's wasn't caused by greed, mismanagement of money, monopoly and corporate malfeasance, but rather all those lives were ruined and thrown into desperate chaos just so banks could control the movie industry?

 

 

I don't know about that...

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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The depression was no accident. There were multiple reasons for it but its the end result you need to look at. Who benefitted? Industry got a large desperate workforce to choose from. Seeing how the most recent stock market crash occurred, its pretty obvious these things are criminal operations using the element of surprise. (I have still not figured out how to operate this board, but I'm trying. :) )

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> {quote:title=joyrider wrote:}{quote}You're a Hollywood star in a 7 year contract going from one bad movie to the next identical bad movie.. what else is there to do but get drunk & womanize. Your job sucks, youre bored to tears - you need to have a little fun & blow off steam. A Hollywood actors life was an unhappy one. March was exactly Norman Maine.

Fredric March had only a five year contract at Paramount - 1929-1934. After that he moved around quite a bit. I think he had some great roles over the years starting at Paramount in some films that perhaps you haven't had a chance to see - in 1930's Royal Family of Broadway as a John Barrymore prototype, in 1930's Laughter as a free spirit trying to win back his girl who has married a rich man to climb out of a life of poverty, Design for Living which is a great precode, as death in Death Takes a Holiday in 1934, and one particularly great Universal from 1948 as a "letter of the law" judge who has to weigh the merits of mercy killing when his wife is struck with a particularly painful and hopelessly terminal disease in "Act of Murder".

 

It seems to me March had a very good career with good roles throughout.

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> {quote:title=joyrider wrote:}{quote}The depression was no accident. There were multiple reasons for it but its the end result you need to look at. Who benefitted? Industry got a large desperate workforce to choose from. Seeing how the most recent stock market crash occurred, its pretty obvious these things are criminal operations using the element of surprise. (I have still not figured out how to operate this board, but I'm trying. :) )

I'm certainly not naive concerning the tendencies of the one percent, but I think that the Depression in the 30's like the one we've been experiencing since 2008 certainly were accidents. In both cases there was a large concentration of wealth that allowed financiers to let their greed get ahead of their brains and they brought down the entire economy in the process. The difference is in 1930 the wealthy did not get a bail out and many went broke from the fallout. There really were (formerly) rich people jumping out of windows over what happened. Since 2008 there have been quite a few laid off people jumping out of windows, but no rich people that I know of. They managed to stay rich.

 

Films that examine the very real phenomena of the rich going broke that were made during the first Depression are "The Crash" and "Faithless" and even the end of "The Great Ziegfeld". If you want to see how carelessly the rich threw money around prior to the Great Depression watch the 1929 version of "Nothing But the Truth". You've got lying stockbrokers making ten thousand dollar bets on whether one of them can tell the truth for 24 hours. Think about the inflation factor involved - probably at least 10:1 - and you see how money was casually regarded by the banking class prior to the 1929 crash.

 

As for the rich crashing the economy to control the film industry, I think that was just a byproduct. The Jazz Singer was made in 1927. The rush to transition to sound happened in the last half of 1928 - first half of 1929. The problem was that anybody with a camera and some inexpensive equipment could go out and make a silent film. Transitioning to sound and making sound films - especially in the early years with the very touchy and expensive equipment involved - took real money. It's what caused DeMille to shut down his independent production company and go to MGM for awhile, and it was a similar story for Buster Keaton. He didn't have the money himself to do sound films and he couldn't get financial backing from anyone else. All of this chaos occurred before the crash of 1929, which didn't even have a ripple effect in the economy until the last half of 1930. By that time the transition to sound was complete.

 

Sorry for the rambling, but this is a favorite subject of mine.

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