Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Studio "Signatures"?


Recommended Posts

 

I had TCM on when a movie started(can't remember which), and though I was in the kitchen, I knew it was a WARNER BROTHERS movie by the music that played as it came on. Back then, ALL Warner's movies started with the big logo on the screen, the same Warner's theme music played over it that would often cleverly meld into the theme music of the movie.

 

 

Warner also had the hitch of having their Foley team use the same report sound for guns. No matter if it was a Colt revolver, .45 automatic, German Luger or any kind of rifle, ALL guns made the same report. So, even if you missed the beginning of the movie, and are unfamiliar with their "stable" of actors, once a gun goes off, you know whether it's Warner or not.

 

 

I consider this one of WARNER STUDIO'S "signatures".

 

 

The thing is, I have no idea as to what other studios' signatures are.

 

 

Little help, please...

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure where you're going with this. I guess all the studios have their distinct logo openings.

 

There is a very distinct and often used "OH!" when somebody gets slugged in a lot films Columbia made. I don't know where it originated, but I first heard it in some 3 Stooges shorts, and then in some Wild, Wild West episodes, and then in the Whistler series. Is that what you mean?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm not neccessarily talking(?) about intros. I know all the familiar ones...The MGM lion, the Columbia lady, Universal's ever changing globe and the like.

 

 

But notice I mentioned the sound used for gunshots. In the '40's, all Warner's movies had ALL firearms make the same sound. Besides just something like that, what did other studios do that set them apart? If you came in the middle of a movie and didn't know which studio put out that movie, what about it would indicate to you WHICH studio did it?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, Sepiatone.

 

I think the Warner Studios used the same orchestra for the majority of their soundtracks, and its fanfare would be introducing the specific soundtrack. It had a sound of it's own. Whether that was the result of Max Steiner orchestrations, I couldn't say. But Steiner did compose the Warner's fanfare. I have a sound effect on my phone of the *Full* 20th Century Fox fanfare, but not Warner Bros.

 

Max Steiner bio at imdb, with some interesting trivia:

 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000070/bio

 

Steiner's blending the WB fanfare with Casablanca's opening:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4RK3b1mH4k

 

there are several fanfares devoted to the studios on YouTube:

this is the newest WB:

 

 

 

The full 20th Century Fox Fanfare:

 

 

 

I had read somewhere years ago, that the Full fanfare had not been used in years, but John Williams had arranged it's comeback for *Star Wars* -- is that true?

 

Star Wars fanfare:

 

 

 

Edited by: casablancalover2 on Oct 14, 2012 2:13 PM

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Janet0312 wrote:}{quote}

> There is a very distinct and often used "OH!" when somebody gets slugged in a lot films Columbia made. I don't know where it originated, but I first heard it in some 3 Stooges shorts, and then in some Wild, Wild West episodes, and then in the Whistler series.

That can be quite funny when there's a sound like that one, that you know so well from something like Three Stooges shorts, then you hear it in some serious movie. Another familiar Columbia sound effect that I've heard in Stooges shorts and also in dramatic movies is their "fall down and grunt" sound.

There's also a very familiar "door opening and closing" sound effect Columbia used often.

Link to post
Share on other sites

*I have a sound effect on my phone of the Full 20th Century Fox fanfare*

 

I believe the full 20th Century Fox fanfare came in with Cinemascope in 1953, the extra bars played over precisely when "Cinemascope" was shown. Don't know if and when the full fanfare was curtailed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Arturo wrote:}{quote}*I have a sound effect on my phone of the Full 20th Century Fox fanfare*

>

> I believe the full 20th Century Fox fanfare came in with Cinemascope in 1953, the extra bars played over precisely when "Cinemascope" was shown. Don't know if and when the full fanfare was curtailed.

It was not, however, used for the very first CinemaScope film, THE ROBE, nor the film's sequel, DEMITRIUS AND THE GLADIATORS. As at Warner Bros., Franz Waxman (who scored DEMETRIUS, PRINCE VALIANT, THE VIRGIN QUEEN and several other Foix films during the 'Scope era) was generally permitted to write his own music over the studio's opening logo -- with chief composer Alfred Newman's blessing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

+*A GOOD CAST IS WORTH REPEATINGphrase was shown above the end credits of many 1930s Universal films.

 

 

Also, it seems like several Warner Bros. films from the early '40s reference the Brooklyn Dodgers, but at this moment, I can think of only 2 --- *Yankee Doodle Dandy* and *Arsenic and Old Lace*.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...