Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Heebie Jeebie - Who'd have thought we'd need a reverse Letterboxing Promo!


yanceycravat
 Share

Recommended Posts

Now that widescreen TV's are more prevalent most of my friends and family want to fill up every inch of space on the screen.

 

I can't get anyone to watch a pre-1950 movie or TV show in it's normal 4:3 ratio. Nobody wants the black bars ON THE SIDES!!!! They keep blowing up the picture.

 

It's driving me complete mad.

 

The time has come, TCM, please alert folks that they're not seeing the whole picture!!!

 

Yancey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ABSOLUTELY! That "Letterboxing" promo is outdated. It REALLY only applies to when one is watchign a widescreen movie on an older 4x3 television screen...NOT a newer 16x9 HDTV.

 

TCM seriously does need to produce a new spot which will PROPERLY present the correct information related to an HDTV....as well as those who still have an older 4x3 tv.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=yanceycravat wrote:}{quote}Now that widescreen TV's are more prevalent most of my friends and family want to fill up every inch of space on the screen.

>

> I can't get anyone to watch a pre-1950 movie or TV show in it's normal 4:3 ratio. Nobody wants the black bars ON THE SIDES!!!! They keep blowing up the picture.

>

 

Well, you could just stretch the 4x3 image, to fill the screen. At least you'd still have the whole image. Some TVs have a variable stretch, that stretches more at the edges than in the middle, to make 4x3 palatable. to the brain dead folks who insist on filling the screen.

 

This brings up a thought I've had for some time. Since most people have wide screen TVs these days, even SD channels should broadcast in WS, to be stretched by the TV to its OAR. Probably most of those who still have 4x3 TVs wouldn't care, since there would be no black bars on their screens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know exactly what you mean and It use to drive me crazy too, then it occurred to me, it's their house and their TV and if they're happy filling every inch of that screen with distorted, stretched out or cropped pictures so be it.

 

Of course, the only friends that I watch movies with friends who are film buffs and naturally we watch them in the proper aspect ratios. If I should get stuck at somebody's house and Gary Cooper is looking four feet high and bloated then I'll just bite my tongue and suffer through it. It's just not worth giving myself an ulcer over :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=markfp2 wrote:}{quote}I know exactly what you mean and It use to drive me crazy too, then it occurred to me, it's their house and their TV and if they're happy filling every inch of that screen with distorted, stretched out or cropped pictures so be it.

> I suffer in huffy silence.

 

If you could expand the print size of a book so that you were missing the words on the edge or pitch a singer/musician higher or lower so that you missed the full tone it's probably the same thing. You may miss a little but you get the gist of things.

 

I don't need to see the top of Lincoln's head to know who he is.

 

:)

 

Yancey.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[~ValentineXavier]wrote:

Well, you could just stretch the 4x3 image, to fill the screen. At least you'd still have the whole image. Some TVs have a variable stretch, that stretches more at the edges than in the middle, to make 4x3 palatable. to the brain dead folks who insist on filling the screen.

 

This brings up a thought I've had for some time. Since most people have wide screen TVs these days, even SD channels should broadcast in WS, to be stretched by the TV to its OAR. Probably most of those who still have 4x3 TVs wouldn't care, since there would be no black bars on their screens.

 

I wish my set or my mother's had the variable stretch. She doesn't like the sidebars either and decided against the stretch. We finally put hers on zoom to fill the screen more normally. She doesn't seem to mind the "heads with no hair". I found out after I got Mom her HDTV that my sister had my late brother's old 27-inch 4x3 and I could have had her send it out from Texas for less than the price of the new set. She'd be happier with that one.

 

I can deal with the different picture sizes but my set is 32 rather than her 26. The panoramic option, which I think is variable, only works when I'm playing DVDs on my home theater system which as a built-in player.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> ABSOLUTELY! That "Letterboxing" promo is outdated. It REALLY only applies to when one is watchign a widescreen movie on an older 4x3 television screen...NOT a newer 16x9 HDTV.

 

I have to pick a nit or two with this. 16:9 is just about 1.78:1. Cinemascope is 2.35:1 if memory serves. I don't remember the aspect ratios of the other 1950s formats offhand. But there still are movies that are going to have a fair amount of letterboxing even on 16:9 TVs.

 

(Technically, there probably ought to be a small bit of black at the top and bottom of your HDTV on a "regular" modern movie, since I believe they're filmed in 1.85:1. But I'd presume they'd just crop a bit off each side like sometimes seems to happen with films in the Academy ratio, where you see part of a letter at the edge of the credits chopped off.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Fedya wrote:}{quote}

> I have to pick a nit or two with this. 16:9 is just about 1.78:1. Cinemascope is 2.35:1 if memory serves. I don't remember the aspect ratios of the other 1950s formats offhand. But there still are movies that are going to have a fair amount of letterboxing even on 16:9 TVs.

>

 

Before 1953, almost everything was shot in "Academy ratio," 1.37:1. Then they started making most Hollywood films in wide screen. The two most common ratios are 2.35:1 (Cinemascope,) and 1.85:1. 1.66:1 is pretty rare, and used mostly in Europe, in the 60s.

 

> (Technically, there probably ought to be a small bit of black at the top and bottom of your HDTV on a "regular" modern movie, since I believe they're filmed in 1.85:1. But I'd presume they'd just crop a bit off each side like sometimes seems to happen with films in the Academy ratio, where you see part of a letter at the edge of the credits chopped off.)

 

You're absolutely correct, we should see thin black bars on the top and bottom of 1.85:1 movies. But, they are commonly transferred as 1.78:1 (16x9.) Even when they are transferred in true 1.85:1, the thin black bars may be hidden by the overscan of your TV.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...