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Anyone watch classic movies in 4:3 aspect ratio on Plasma TV?


rover27
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I've been considering dumping my old 32" Tube TV and going to High Definition. I've read that Plasmas have the best, most natural picture quality and are closer to CRTs in PQ. And handle motion better. I've always liked the CRT picture compared to the seemingly overly brighness of many LED/LCDs I've seen. I've been looking at the Panasonic Viera ST50 Plasma.

 

The question is burn-in on Plasmas. Even after breaking Plasma in for 100-200 hours, it sounds like they can experience burn-in. A Q&A answer by a Samsung rep on a television retailer's website to the question of burn-in was that watching stationary images, station logos, 4:3 pillar bar images, etc. was not recommended over 5% of the viewing time a week. 5%??

 

 

Even with scroll bars, pixel shifting ,etc.that are built into todays Plasmas, he said this could happen. I know I would watch 4:3 classic movies way more than 5% a week. I have TCM on a lot and watch older TV series on Hallmark and TV Land(I Love Lucy, Andy Griffith, Perry Mason, MASH, etc.). I also have hundreds of DVD recordings of classic movies.

 

 

Does anyone have experience with 4:3 ratio movies or TV shows on a Plasma TV?

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5%? Wow, my Samsung LED warned about more than 15% but here we are six years later and I don't see the effect of any burn-in yet despite my watching a lot of TCM and old movies on DVD.

 

And my set is on most of the day as electric wallpaper. ;)

 

 

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> {quote:title=clore wrote:}{quote}5%? Wow, my Samsung LED warned about more than 15% but here we are six years later and I don't see the effect of any burn-in yet despite my watching a lot of TCM and old movies on DVD.

>

> And my set is on most of the day as electric wallpaper. ;)

>

But you have an LED right? Not a Plasma? I was wondering about the affect of 4:3 on Plasma. I've never heard of burn-in on LED/LCD TVs.

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I realize that, but what I was intending to illustrate is that perhaps the manufacturer is overstating the case just to be on the safe side. Especially since we're both referring to Samsung.

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Do they still make Plasmas? I too wondered if LEDs overheat like the dear old CRTs did.

 

I've had my LED on all day during the recent, albeit sparse, classic days of TCM, and had no ill effects.

 

My advice, apologies to my dear old CRT - dump it, and run, don't walk, to buy a new teevee, be it Plasma or LCD or LED. The difference is amazing.

 

Mind you, the newfangled flash and sparkle junk made overseas won't last as long as the old substance CRTs made in America or wherever else they were made in 1996, but oh well, what will?

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I've never seen a plasma TV picture, but I've been very pleased with my Sanyo LCD, which I've had for about 3 or 4 years.

 

I've had no burn-in problem, and my TV is on about 12 hours a day, almost always in the 4:3 mode.

 

If you think the picture on an LCD is too bright, you can turn down the brightness. Mine has a brightness and contrast control, and I can set mine just right for black and white movies, and also color films and TV shows.

 

Occasionally I watch HD broadcast TV and the image is amazingly sharp.

 

But even on SD movies on TCM, the image is also amazingly sharp. I can finally read the small copyright dates at the bottom of the opening credits in old films, which I usually could not do on my old tube TV.

 

Tube TVs will give you about 500 or so lines of image. My LCD seems to give me thousands. Maybe that is just an illusion, but it is a good one. :)

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}I've never seen a plasma TV picture, but I've been very pleased with my Sanyo LCD, which I've had for about 3 or 4 years.

>

> I've had no burn-in problem, and my TV is on about 12 hours a day, almost always in the 4:3 mode.

>

>

> If you think the picture on an LCD is too bright, you can turn down the brightness. Mine has a brightness and contrast control, and I can set mine just right for black and white movies, and also color films and TV shows.

>

>

> Occasionally I watch HD broadcast TV and the image is amazingly sharp.

>

>

> But even on SD movies on TCM, the image is also amazingly sharp. I can finally read the small copyright dates at the bottom of the opening credits in old films, which I usually could not do on my old tube TV.

>

>

> Tube TVs will give you about 500 or so lines of image. My LCD seems to give me thousands. Maybe that is just an illusion, but it is a good one. :)

>

I've never heard of LCDs or LEDs having a burn in problem. It's a Plasma thing. Most of the sites that rate TVs(Cnet, Consumer Reports, etc.) give Plasmas the edge on picture quality, more normal looking picture, deeper blacks(not shades of gray), viewing angle, better contrast and color depth, better motion control(not getting blurry during fast action), and usually cheaper than the same size LED/LED. The disadvantages are they can have glare in bright rooms(like a CRT) and possible burn in problem.

 

From what I understand, their lifespan isn't much different anymore from LCDs. I had 2 friends have Samsung LCDs go bad in less than 3 years.

 

So I'd like to try the Plasma, but if there is a burn in problem with 4:3 images that's a no go. Would like to hear a Plasma owner that watches 4:3 images to comment.

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The only kind of HDTV I will consider is a DLPTV. They cost less, use far less electricity, have no burn-in, don't dim over a couple of years like plasma, or a few years like LCD. Their entire surface is projected light - there is NO grid. They are the most natural and cinematic looking display there is. I've had mine since 2006. I love it. This is the same tech that theaters use for digital projection, and they use it because it IS the best.

 

My TV is a Samsung, but they don't make DLPs any more. I think Mitsubishi is the main manufacturer these days. I know that they make some very nice models. If you buy a big one, say 60" +, they might be 8-10" deep. This will fit comfortably on all the standard cabinet stands used for flat screens.

 

I've never owned a plasma, but watched several. On the Audio Video Science Forum, they have the reputation of making SD signals look the worst of the various HD displays. DLP stands for digital light processing. DLPs are 1080p native. They have a postage stamp sized chip that consists of micromirrors, one for each pixel. These reflect the light to the screen, and are why there is no grid, like there is on other systems.The light comes from a bulb. It dims just a bit, two or three days before it goes out. Replace the bulb, and the TV is as bright and sharp as the day you bought it. No other system keeps its brightness like that. My TV is on all the time, and I have to replace my bulb about every four years.

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}The light comes from a bulb. It dims just a bit, two or three days before it goes out. Replace the bulb, and the TV is as bright and sharp as the day you bought it. No other system keeps its brightness like that. My TV is on all the time, and I have to replace my bulb about every four years.

That's the best part: You can replace the bulb yourself with NO service fee. Other tv types go and you have to replace the entire set.

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