Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Do all guest programmers choose from the same list of twelve films?


slaytonf
 Share

Recommended Posts

Or is it they have almost identical tastes? The sameness of the programs month to month is discouraging. Tonight we have Jim Lehrer. Alright, I'm thinking, sophisticated, erudite, cosmopolitan, no dummy. We'll get something interesting, something to mix things up a bit. But no, the same titles, the most repeated titles. Fine movies all, but why have a guest programmer if you're just going to air the same thing that would appear any other night of the week? But have no fear, TCM is aware of the potential for exasperation, so after Mr. Lehrer's triptych, it will air as a compensation to its viewers. . . . North By Northwest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You would think that either way, be it Lehrer's night or October 14's daytime schedule, someone would have said that MY FAIR LADY only deserves one airing in a month. Too late to change Guest Programmer night, then take the other airing off and use the time to play two movies.

 

Plus, it's on the schedule again in November and December.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*"Or is it they have almost identical tastes? The sameness of the programs month to month is discouraging."* - slaytonf

 

Not trying to be argumentative but the previous six Guest Programmers (prior to tonight's stint by Jim Lehrer) selected some of the most diverse titles ever presented by a group of GPs - save for "tried and true" Spike Lee.

 

_Regis Philbin - September_

*Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House*

*Somebody Up There Likes Me*

*High Society*

*Gunga Din*

 

_Spike Lee - July_

*Ace In The Hole*

*Night Of The Hunter*

*On The Waterfront*

*A Face In The Crowd*

 

_Ellen Barkin - June_

*Fat City*

*Nights In Cabiria*

*Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf?*

*The Last Picture Show*

 

_Debra Winger - May_

*Night Of The Iguana*

*Wings Of Desire*

*Rififi*

*Gilda*

 

_Anthony Bourdain - April_

*The Searchers*

*Eyes Without a Face*

*Get Carter*

*Withnail & I*

 

_Jules Feiffer - March_

*Golddiggers of 1933*

*My Man Godfrey*

*This Gun For Hire*

*They Drive By Night*

 

And here's the list of titles being presented in November by a group of the "Movie Morlocks" from the TCM blog site -

 

*The Locket* - Suzi Doll

*Dracula's Daughter* - Richard Harland Smith

*Five Million Years To Earth* - keelsetter

and BEST of all -

*Touchez Pos Au Gribisi* introduced by our friend moirafinnie6

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't take offence, and I realized as I wrote this thread I opened myself up for this objection. Normally, I don't complain, because, on the whole, TCM's virtues are infinitely more valuable than its drawbacks. And besides, people make all the points I'd make, anyway. But something did occur to me that was different from what had been posted before, and worthwhile mentioning, and perhaps I didn't emphasize it enough, and that is why go to the trouble of getting a special host, if you're not going to make it special?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*"... why go to the trouble of getting a special host, if you're not going to make it special?"* - slaytonf

 

Aaah. I get it now.

 

I think asking celebrities and other known persons to introduce some of the "traditional" titles is what is supposed to make the showing special - at least new and different from having Robert Osborne introduce *Gunga Din*, *The Searchers* or *My Fair Lady* one more time. That's always been my take on the Guest Programmer series - not necessarily to introduce "new" films to the viewer but to give an old favorite a different context and presentation.

 

For the vast (casual) TCM viewing public, the list of "favorite" films is probably not as large or varied as we might think. And who can argue with anyone choosing a Frank Capra film or an Audrey Hepburn film as one of their favorites?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does seem rather silly for a famous guest programmer to come on and tell his story and then introduce the same most-frequently-shown films that are already shown in prime time several times each year.

 

I think maybe TCM does this not for us frequent viewers, but as a promotional technique, sending out press releases to newspapers and the generally press announcing these "special events", and they might feel they need to show the more common and famous classic films to introduce newbees to TCM. The names of the famous guests, mentioned in the general press, bring in the new viewers, and the most common classic films are shown to them as an introduction to TCM. That's what the famous names are for, for publicity for TCM, outside of TCM media. It's not for us. It's for everybody else except us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did it ever dawn on any of you that this is the very reason these films are played so often ? It might surprise you but, channels like this are gaining in popularity. And new viewers are watching all the time who have heard of these films but, haven't seen them.

 

Films like the ones shown this evening for me are very easy ice breakers since most have seen them or wanted to see them hence, they are shown often .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting the information about the last six Guest Programmers, Kyle! I've enjoyed watching the Guest Programmer events, and the last six months have had some exciting and unusual choices, like Ellen Barkin's. I never would have believed she would have chosen *NIghts In Cabiria*, or that Debra Winger would have chosen *Rififi,* or Regis Philbin would have chosen *Gunga Din.*

 

I can't wait until the November Guest Programmers from The Movie Morlocks!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>per Geraldddddd:

>Did it ever dawn on any of you that this is the very reason these films are played so often ?

 

In fact, it didn't. And thanks for mentioning it. I am glad to hear TCM is increasing in popularity. I understand the necessity of cultivating new viewers, as Mr. Dobbs has referred to. I suppose the shark must keep swimming or suffocate. Reading the comments has made me think back to the first time I saw My Fair Lady on TCM. Oh, what a treat, I thought. It was in letterbox, too, a term I was unfamiliar with at the time, but whose purpose I recognized, and appreciated. Seeing films like this, and other classics whose names I had heard, but never seen, is what hooked me on TCM. Now I am jaded, and it is only the obscure discovery, like Employee's Entrance, that can thrill me the same. I suppose I should feel grateful for that. Even If I can't view these movies with the same enjoyment I did, I can remember what I did feel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif} But have no fear, TCM is aware of the potential for exasperation, so after Mr. Lehrer's triptych, it will air as a compensation to its viewers. . . . North By Northwest.{font}

 

 

I'm watching this now; like Lehrer, I never get tired of it. Just to clarify, it is actually part of the films Lehrer selected, not airing "after" his selections.

 

BLU

Link to comment
Share on other sites

a lot of people have made the (valid) point that the Guest Programmers are on (ostensibly) to attract new viewers and draw new folks into the Great Classic Film Cult (gooble gobble, gooble, gobble), and that while *we're* *sick to death* of A Face in the Crowd, Duck Soup, NbNW, The Third Man and others, that *there are* people out there who've never seen either and may watch because, for some reason, they really follow Jim Lehrer or Drew Barrymore or they are one of the five people who actually care what Spike Lee thinks...about anything...ever.

 

sorry, I'm digressing...

 

But with Lehrer, I just have to throw out the fact that All the King's Men is a *crummy, crummy* film. Boring, stilted, baaaaaaaaaaaaadly acted (that's right), and missing all the nuance and atmosphere of the novel. Anyone new to classic movies who tried to sit through that at 8:00 would probably say "no thanks." I know I'm being presumptious, but oh well.

 

I also also have to note that My Fair Lady is too long a film to pick if we're going to be offering an entree to classic films, but then again, why they start these GP picks at eight pm is beyond me. No one without a DVR or a serious case of insomnia is going to be around to see the last of the four when it comes on circa three in the a.m. They really should start them at six in the evening, or *better yet- show them on weekend AFTERNOONS.*

 

But no one listens to me about anything...ever.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Oct 26, 2012 8:51 AM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

True, the Guest Programmer should be one enticing new tune-in, but let's face it, is it enough to keep one watching for the next eight or more hours? If Jim Lehrer is going to be enticing anyone, it will be those in his own demographic and I've got to believe those are the same ones who are already watching in a great percentage.

 

Speaking purely from my survey of one, the guest host concept makes more sense on a station that actually has commercial breaks and features the speakers in the breaks also. Otherwise, even if they brought Boris Karloff back from the dead, I'm not going to sit through all of MY FAIR LADY once again just to hear his response when Osborne asks him at the end "What's your favorite part of the film?"

 

Just once I'd like to hear a guest programmer say "I haven't seen this in so long, I forgot most of it. I'll have to watch it for real when I get home."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe that an important factor is that some movies are aired often because many people like them and consider them important. The guest programmers are among those who like them and consider them important and therefore they chose them despite the fact that they are common. It is as if you ask people to name the five best presidents before President Richard Nixon. It is likely that three names will be on nearly all lists. Five more names will be on the majority of lists. It is likely that some others will be missing even although a great many people may be asked to create such a list.

 

It may also be that the guest programmers have a public image to maintain. It may be used against them if they chose a movie which is not very mainstream or which includes any material which is not mainstream or is not currently politically correct. It would be damaging beyond worth if they were publicly connected to a movie which unrepentantly contains racism, fascism or belief in alien abductions.

 

I believe this second factor is supported by the fact that the Movie Morlocks have less of a public image separate from movies to maintain and so their selections could be more esoteric.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bundie, it was my misinterpretation. When I checked to see which films were Mr. Lehrer's, I thought I read he had three selections.

 

clore, I do remember Cloris Leachman saying the reason she chose Bridge on the River Kwai was that she had not seen it before.

 

SansFin: Oooo, paranoid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=bundie wrote:}{quote}Jim Lehrer told Robert Osborne at the end of North by Northwest that he would not be moderating any of the presidential debates this election...I guess he changed his mind!

>

> BLU

 

If you watched the first debate in Denver, it was painfully obvious that it had no moderator.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Your example of President's is a good one but unlike with studio era movies the possible choices of Presidents is very limited. i.e. there are thousand of movie choices. But the only way I can see to ensure variety would be to ask a potential guest host to make 10 choices and then select 3 movies from that list of 10. NOW if most of their 10 choices are "vanilla", well this means the guest host is vanilla and thus it is time to select a different guess host.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=hlywdkjk wrote,}{quote}

>

> I think asking celebrities and other known persons to introduce some of the "traditional" titles is what is supposed to make the showing special - not necessarily to introduce "new" films to the viewer but to give an old favorite a different context and presentation.

>

Perhaps you're on to something. They should just let the Guest Programmer talk about the movie for the entire duration of the film, like the film commentary on the special features of a DVD. TCM would air the film in the background and this would allow for insightful comments from Robert and the guest to hold the viewer. Occasionally, a bit of dialogue would leak through and this would spur further discussion. The airing of the film would be just superfluous.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...