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If you dig classic horror you gotta be rockin' this afternoon and all night


markbeckuaf
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It's a classic horror fan's delight!!!!! Starting at 4pm EST, here is the all night lineup:

 

THE DEVIL BAT (1940)

WHITE ZOMBIE (1932)

THE BODY SNATCHER (1945)

FRANKENSTEIN (1931)

SON OF FRANKENSTEIN (1939)

THE WOLF MAN (1941)

THE MUMMY (1932)

THE MUMMY'S HAND (1940)

ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)

THE INVISIBLE MAN (1931)

 

Man, this lineup is the grooviest!!! I can't wait to get home from work to start checking it out!!! Glued to TCM tonight, dig it!

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Looking forward to watching SON OF FRANKENSTEIN closely this time. I recently viewed a friend's 16mm print of the movie in which he had inserted the couple minutes of footage missing from American prints. He was able to take the clips from a print of the longer British version and put them into his where they belonged in the story.

Curious to see if the version TCM is showing will include these scenes.

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> {quote:title=musicalnovelty wrote:}{quote}He was able to take the clips from a print of the longer British version and put them into his where they belonged in the story.

> Curious to see if the version TCM is showing will include these scenes.

TCM doesn't show the British print. I have that version also (the copies out there are not very good, incidentally), and have been thinking of doing the same thing. I find it very strange that Universal has not done a restoration of the film from that version, though. The addiitional footage only amounts to a little over one minute. This is a breakdown of what those scenes contain.

 

14:50 - Total time is approx. :55 sec. - Peter asleep in bed, with Ygor peeking in at him through the wall, followed by Josephine Hutchinson in her bedroom brushing her hair. She looks out the doorway, then goes out of the bedroom, down the hallway to Peter's room right before Ygor closes the peephole, and she looks in on the kid. Sequence ends on Peter asleep, and then fades out. Film continues with the shot of the equipment being brought through the village and the arrival of Krogh at the castle.

 

55:30 - Longer/alternate take of Basil trying to open the stone doorway.

 

1:04:29 - Total time is approx. :15 sec. - This occurs right after the scene with Wolf telling Benson about the monster being alive and his encounter with him. Additional shot of Ygor and the monster walking through the hidden passageway, with the shot ending on a fade-out. Continues with Ygor and the monster coming out of the hidden passageway and pushing the heavy pillar to close the entrance.

 

1:15:35 - Additional shot of the villagers heading through the forest to the castle. This follows the shot of the villagers gathering in the town square, and the film continues with the scene of Krogh arriving at the castle and meeting Wolf outside, warning him not to go anywhere.

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These are the REAL CLASSICS!

 

I've been watching these on TV since around 1953, except for some years in the early '70s when they weren't on TV much.

 

An amazing thing about them is that the film quality keeps getting better! TCM finally has restored HD dubs from the 35mm originals.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}These are the REAL CLASSICS!

>

> I've been watching these on TV since around 1953, except for some years in the early '70s when they weren't on TV much.

>

>

> An amazing thing about them is that the film quality keeps getting better! TCM finally has restored HD dubs from the 35mm originals.

>

I believe it wasn't until 1957 and the famous Shock Theater package from Universal that these classic Universal horrors were first shown on television...not 1953.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_Theater

 

I doubt they "weren't on tv much" in the early 70's, because that's precisely when I first started getting hooked on the classics Universal horror films (between the late 60's-early 70's) on our local late-night Friday horror host program in Cleveland, Hoolihan and Big Chuck. I certainly saw them quite often back then.

 

It's not surprising that TCM has the restored remasters that Universal released on Blu-ray recently.

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I don't exactly remember when, as a kid, I first saw these particular ones on TV. I'll take your word about 1957. But I do remember some imitations as early as '53, '54 etc. There were plenty of imitations made in the 1930s and '40s. Son of... Daughter of... Return of... Ghost of... etc.

 

You might be right about the '70s too. I just noticed in the cities where I lived, I couldn't find these old classics on TV much in the late '60s or early '70s, but I began to see them again by the late '70s.

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}I don't exactly remember when, as a kid, I first saw these particular ones on TV. I'll take your word about 1957. But I do remember some imitations as early as '53, '54 etc. There were plenty of imitations made in the 1930s and '40s. Son of... Daughter of... Return of... Ghost of... etc.

As far as I know and that Wikipedia article says, the Universal horrors were NEVER shown on tv until Universal put together that Shock Theater package.

 

What "imitations" in the early 50's? I don't recall any such films until the late 50's when Hammer Studios began their series of horror films based on the classic monsters. The 50's were almost entirely sci-fi films and big bug type monsters....the "atomic horrors" type of thriller.

 

Those 30's and 40's films you cited were actually made by Universal...Son of Dracula, Daughter of Dracula, Ghost of Frankenstein, Son of Frankenstein, etc. Except for Return of The Vampire with Lugosi, made by Columbia pictures. Some of the "poverty row" studios made films which had a similar Universal type of atmosphere, but I also don't recall any specific films which "imitated" what Universal was doing...although Return of The Vampire comes darn close. It was made one year after Universal's first two-monster movie Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man.

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I agree, Fred, it was an amazing night!!! Loved every moment of it, stayed up most of the night to do so!

 

Weird about THE MUMMY'S HAND being cut off at the end, and I hadn't realized it was a premiere until Robert Osborne mentioned it! Coolio! It's my favorite of the "mummy" sequels!

 

Totally groovy night!

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