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Happy Birthday Vivian Leigh


MaryLyn2
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And Thank You TCM for showing so many of her movies.

 

I am also thrilled that we finally got our cable back on Saturday night. Thank you Verizon for sending a repairman out on Saturday to replace the FIOS box that "blew out" during Sandy.

 

I am getting nothing done today but I am seeing movies I never saw before. If it wasn't for TCM I might have an organized house, laundry done, grocery shopping done, windows clean - you have the same list. But I must say I am enjoying watching the Vivian Leigh movies today.

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Vivien Leigh was the SOTM back in September 2010. All of these were played then, along with GONE WITH THE WIND, ANNA KARENINA and CAESAR AND CLEOPATRA. She has a very thin filmography.

 

We did not get to see 21 DAYS TOGETHER and THE DEEP BLUE SEA.

 

I am glad that TCM is showing SIDEWALKS OF LONDON today. I do not think it has aired since she was SOTM. The other films are in fairly frequent circulation.

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VivienLeigh.jpg

Happy Birthday Vivian Leigh (1913-1967)

 

I think she was one of the most beautiful actresses during the Golden Age of Hollywood. She was beautiful and so talented.

 

“That Hamilton Woman” is one of my all time favorite romantic films.

 

 

I saw a documentary years ago about Lawrence Olivier and of course Vivian was a large of the discussion. William Wyler was talking about "Wuthering Heights " and how Vivian wanted to play the part of Cathy in the film. He told her no part she could have the part of Isabella, but she refused that part. He said, “Vivian you are not well know yet in America and you won’t better part than Isabella believe me," but she still refused. He then laughed and said, “I guess she showed me, she ended up playing Scarlett O’Hara!

 

 

Sir John Gielgud also stated that when she first starting acting on the stage in London with Larry a lot of people thought “such a beauty could not “house" a great acting talent but she proved them wrong.

 

 

Lori

 

Edited by: Lori3 on Nov 5, 2012 11:58 AM

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>Would love to see The Deep Blue Sea some day, don't even have the foggiest clue what it's about.

 

It is based on the Terence Rattigan play about infidelity and its repercussions on a frustrated well-married woman (Vivien Leigh). Filmed in Eastman Color using CinemaScope.

 

images-542.jpg

 

From harry-76 at the IMDB:

 

THE DEEP BLUE SEA represents a notable staple in the film repertoire of Vivien Leigh. Given the enormous popularity and artistic achievements of this consummate British actress, it seems incredible that this film is not available on video. She is always fascinating to watch, and this drama about marital difficulties provides her with a good "modern day" role, compared to her many period/costume pieces. She is beautiful, skillful, and intelligent in her approach to and realization of her characters, and all are evident in this sensibly presented drama. Her co-star, Kenneth More, is professional as always; Eric Portman gives his usual strong character support; and the appearance of Emlyn Williams is a special bonus. The film needs to be seen on the big screen in CinemaScope to get its maximum impact. It deserves to be revived, and more importantly, made available on video.

 

And one might add that it needs to be made available on TCM.

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I think 20th Century Fox originally produced THE DEEP BLUE SEA. Leigh took the part after Marlene Dietrich turned it down. I bought a copy of the film from a reliable seller on the ioffer website. It would still be nice for TCM to broadcast it so it gains a wider audience.

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There's commentary on the Criterion Collection release of "Rebecca" (1940) about finding "I," who ultimately was played by Joan Fontaine. The commentary suggests that there's no need to actually "see" the Rebecca character because in our collective mind's eye, she looks exactly like Vivien Leigh.

 

 

Think about it . . . the flowing dark locks, the self-satisfied expression, the beauty, married to Olivier . . . Makes a lot of sense and it works for me.

 

 

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>thanks for the info on The Deep Blue Sea. sounds fun. I (for some reason) thought perhaps it was yet another lifeboat drama, along the lines of Souls at Sea or Lifeboat.

 

I think it's a figurative title...that her character is caught between an affair and the deep blue sea. Nothing titanic about it, except her breaking heart.

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Yes RMeingast, Miss Leigh or Lady Olivier had a sad life in that she had to deal with that awful bi-polar disease and then contracted tuberculosis.

 

I read a book years ago (I still have it) called "Love Scene" it is about Leigh and Olivier's life together. They really loved each other very much and he tried hard to stay with her but her manic depression just was too much for him to bare.

 

I do remember reading when she left this earth Olivier came to her home and spent about an hour alone with her. Very heartbreaking, but what a love story.

 

I also think they made one of the most handsome and / or beautiful couples during the Golden Age of Hollywood. So sad they never were blessed with a child of their own.

 

Lori

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{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}*Most Vivians DO spell their name V-I-V-I-A-N. For some reason, she spelled it Vivien.*{font}

 

 

She was actually born Vivian Mary Hartley (with the traditional spelling). When she went into acting her agent suggested she "femininize" her first name by changing the spelling to "Vivien." In the first years of the 20th Century, Vivian (like Beverly) was a man's name as well.

 

Her last name came from the first name of her first husband, Leigh Holman.

 

BLU

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> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}

> images-542.jpg

>

> it needs to be made available on TCM.

Since Leigh was SOTM a couple of years or so ago, and she has such a scant filmography (maybe some 15 or so movies, and most all are shown regularly on the network) it would seem likely that they at least tried to get Deep Blue Sea, but it was a no-dice deal for some reason.

 

 

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...one other thing I always throw out about Viv: she and Judy Holliday are about the only two performers I can think of who gave Oscar-level performances in *almost every film* in which they were the lead (this is helped, of course, by the fact that neither did all that many films.)

 

As well-deserved as both of Leigh's Oscars were (I agree 100% with both her 1939 and 1951 victories) it's a pity that she was not nominated for anything besides these two turns, because not only was her work in Waterloo Bridge, That Hamilton Woman!, Anna Karenina, The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone and Ship of Fools more than worthy of nominating, had she gotten the recognition from the Academy (especially in 1940 and 1941) *she might have been ancouraged to make more films than the scant and tragically few that she did*.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Nov 6, 2012 9:17 AM

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}Vivian was a man's (name)? Reminds me of Johnny Cash's "A Boy Named Sue".

Well, given the (none too fun) choice between being named Vivian, Evelyn or Beverly- I'd pick Vivian in a heartbeat. Not because it's great, but kripes, can you imagine being a guy named Beverly?

 

Those options make me grateful for my real name, which believe me- is none too strong or masculine in itself.

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