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"Classic Film" NPR Sunday Puzzler


hlywdkjk
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I posted this in "Games And Trivia" and got no help so I thought I'd ask the bright minds here.

 

If you listen to Weekend Edition Sunday on NPR you are familiar with the weekly puzzler question with Will Shortz of the NYTimes. Today's puzzler is an anagram puzzle with a classic film as the final answer.

 

*With a single stroke, one can change a letter of the alphabet into a different letter. For example, an F can be changed into an E. An O can be changed into a Q.*

 

*Write the phrase LEAD PENCIL all in capital letters and change one letter into a different letter with a single stroke. Rearrange the letters to form the name of a classic film.*

 

*What are the letters and what is the film?*

 

I can come up with five possible 'letter changes' -

the P into an R,

the I into a T,

the I into an L and

the C into an O

(and maybe the C into a G)

 

So, anyone want to lend a hand?

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I believe it would depend on desired clarity and rely on a certain "fudginess" in handwriting but I would accept:

 

D becomes B

E becomes B

I becomes X

L becomes U or Z

N becomes W

P become A

 

 

I do not know if it will help but a list of some ten-letter movie titles can be found at:

http://bestforpuzzles.com/lists/search.pl?cat2=films&length=10

 

I believe the list could be narrowed down quickly because I do not see how any of the letters could be made into "S" or "K" and I am sure other letters could be quickly discredited.

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SansFin -

 

I don't think we can "fudge" to that level, given the examples provided in the question. (F to E. O to Q) The example showed how simple the change has to be.

 

And BTW...

To everyone -- I know there are anagram makers / decipherers online. Please don't use one and post the answer here. I - and hopefully others - will want to solve this without a computer's help.

 

Thanks!

 

And thanks to SansFin for jumping in to help too.

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*"Gaaaaaaaaaaaaaarrrrrrggggggggggggggggg!!!!!!!!!!!! You've ruined my afternoon."* - A deW

 

Sorry 'bout that. It happens to me too.

 

*""Dance" "dead" "angel" "Near" "uncle" and "I'll" are the words I can form that seem like they'll go somewhere, but no."*

 

I know! It's terrible. None of the possible words formed immediately point one to a "classic film" that we in here should be able to name easily. Because if anyone should be able to come up with a classic film title easily, it is this membership.

 

*"... or (and I doubt this, but I'll throw it out) they could mean "film" as in a film that coats something."*

 

Oooh. Nope. Can't get "Lemon Pledge" to work. Dammit.

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A few minutes of thought eventually yielded a famous film released in 1950 as the correct answer.

 

Most people woulnd't recognize the names of any of the stars in the cast.

 

Edit: Oh, and there's no real trick here.

 

Edited by: Fedya on Nov 14, 2012 4:05 PM

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Maybe someone could help me with one that Shortz did a few years back that I didn't find out the answer but I recall it occasionally. This Oscar winner in one of the acting categories has a name where the first & last name are both five letters and both names begin with the same letter and end with the same letter. I thought it was Kevin Klein until I realized Klein was spelled Kline. I looked at the list of winners one time but overlooked it. I still don't know who it is.

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There is an interesting puzzle involving the clock paradox of the 1905 Special Theory of Relativity. Both of two relatively moving observers see each other's clock slow down at exactly the same rate, yet when they re-unite, side by side, one of the clocks lags behind the other. If they both are seen by the other observer to slow down at the same rate, how can one clock lag behind the other when they re-unite, and which of two exactly equal clocks would be the one that lags behind?

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*"A few minutes of thought eventually yielded a famous film released in 1950 as the correct answer."* - Fedya

 

Lucky you. ("A few minutes...". Harumph!)

 

*"...the title is more famous as a story and concept than specifically as the 1950 film which is based on it."* - A deW

 

Really? Hmmm. Better known as a story...

 

OK. Let me ask. Is one to change the P to an R? I've kinda settled on that being the logical change.

 

Edited by: hlywdkjk on Nov 14, 2012 5:08 PM

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*"This Oscar winner in one of the acting categories has a name where the first & last name are both five letters and both names begin with the same letter and end with the same letter."* - helenbaby

 

Hmmm. One I can think of does have a "twist" -- but didn't win in an acting category. (Won an honorary award.) This person was nominated in an acting category and, for the twist, goes by first, middle and last names where the first and last names fit the "same letter" requirements.

But that doesn't help IF it is a Oscar winner.

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> {quote:title=hlywdkjk wrote:}{quote}

> Thanks 'clore'. It was my first thought to change that letter and I've always found one's "first choice" is usually the correct one.

Yep, gut instinct is a misnomer. It's really a subconscious calculation based upon one's knowledge and tests have shown such instincts are correct more often than not.

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Grrrr!

 

OK. I finally got it. It's a name. A "nonsense" name, at that. There isn't a normal word in the answer. And it's a film that has never been on TCM.

 

Congrats to everyone that figured it out. If one listens to NPR and wants to submit their answer in a chance to play the live edition of the Puzzler on the air with Will Shortz, go here -

http://www.npr.org/2012/11/11/164870778/saluting-the-flag

 

Click on the "submit your answer" link. I think I will.

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