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You Know You're A Film Geek When...


RMeingast
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I think one thing we all have in common as film geeks is noticing stuff in movies that others may not or probably don't. Could be supporting actors in a film, trivia, mistakes, you name it.

Most people wouldn't have a clue what we're talking about (or give a hoot) but film fanatics seem to get it...

That's what most of this message board is like, anyway.

 

For example, I was watching Jean Renoir's "The Elusive Corporal" on TFO the other night and I noticed O.E. Hasse doing a cameo as the drunk passenger on the train...

 

So I'm thinking to myself, "Holy Jean Renoir, that's O.E. Haase doing a cameo as a drunken kraut who befriends the escaped French POWs"...

 

 

Only a film geek would notice something like that.

Watching a French film on a French-language TV channel and noticing a German actor doing a cameo in it...

 

 

Hasse was also in some TCM aired films like Hitchcock's "I Confess" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Confess_%28film%29) in which Hasse plays the murderer, and a small part in "The Big Lift" (another Montgomery Clift movie). He was also in the Gable film "Betrayed."

More about Hasse here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O._E._Hasse

 

 

And, despite upcoming demise of TVO's "SNAM," the French-language TFO's Cineclub is still going strong.

 

 

Friday night two excellent films: the above mentioned Renoir flick "Le Caporal épinglé" ("The Elusive Corporal":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Elusive_Corporal

 

 

Followed by Yasujirō Ozu's 1934 silent "A Story of Floating Weeds":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Story_of_Floating_Weeds

 

 

Ozu's silent had French subtitles of the Japanses title cards, so if you know some French you can follow what's going on... Otherwise, it's the same for any silent movie to follow what's happening.

 

BTW, Saturday night, TFO aired a more modern flick with Bruno Dumont's 2011 "Hors Satan":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outside_Satan

 

Less than kind review of film from "Variety" here:

http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117945244?refcatid=31

 

 

The "Variety" review of the film above is interesting in that it shows how maybe some people who are so used to Hollywood films just might not "get" an intelligently done film like "Hors Satan," where the viewer is left to figure out much of what is going on...

There was a little bit of "****" with me at first, but then I quickly understood what was happening, or thought I did, anyway... And the cinematography is gorgeous...

 

 

A more positive review of this film here (spoiler about ending): http://moria.co.nz/fantasy/outside-satan-2011-hors-satan.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I suspect anyone who starts a sentence with, "For example, I was watching Jean Renoir's "The Elusive Corporal" on TFO the other night..." just might be a film geek. :)

 

My geekdom is a lot more common. I just get really jazzed when I see Byron Foulger, Frank Jenks, or Dave Willock in a film. My family can't watch films or even TV with me because I'll pause the action to tell them who some obscure player is.

 

Thanks for the information. Now I have someone else to look for in films.

 

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I remember the first time I saw *Rhapsody in Blue*. I missed the opening credits, and about five minutes in, George meets his music teacher, at which point I immediately cried out, "That's Albert Bassermann!"

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Switch film geek to tv geek and this will make sense.

 

On American Horror Story Asylum one of the nuns is named Mary Eunice. One of the executive producers of that show is Jennifer Salt. Her most famous role is Eunice Tate on Soap. A TV geek would wonder if that is deliberate or a coincidence

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> {quote:title=sfpcc1 wrote:}{quote}Switch film geek to tv geek and this will make sense.

>

> On American Horror Story Asylum one of the nuns is named Mary Eunice. One of the executive producers of that show is Jennifer Salt. Her most famous role is Eunice Tate on Soap. A TV geek would wonder if that is deliberate or a coincidence

Here's another TV one. On the series Reasonable Doubts-just remembering that series makes me a geek-they regularly went up before the same judge whose name plate read "Augustus Triandos". I always wondered who on the show's production staff was a Baltimore Orioles fan and had named this reoccurring, yet minor character after the catcher from the 50s and 60s.

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Did you know that *Lonesome Dove* started out as a movie script? Around the time of *The Last Picture Show*, Peter Bogdanovich announced that he was planning a "super western" that was to star James Stewart, John Wayne and Henry Fonda.

 

Larry McMurtry wrote a script, but the story goes that Wayne didn't care for it and Bogdanovich moved on to other projects. The writer turned it into a novel and eventually it became the mini-series.

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I defy anyone to point out *any* scene in *any* movie in *any* year, set in New York City, where a car does *NOT* have to circle the block in order to find a parking space more than one door away from the driver's destination. There are even movies where a car pulls up and parks right in front of the entrance to a Broadway show----Easy, one hand! I guess it's just one of the many perks of being a movie star. ;)

 

As for a specific movie, maybe you have to be a baseball fan to notice that in Bang The Drum Slowly, there's a scene where a popup is hit in one ballpark, but when it comes down and is caught, it's in a completely different park. Pretty sure that the two stadiums in question are Shea Stadium in New York and RFK Stadium in Washingon, but it's been nearly 40 years since I've seen the movie, and I have no inclination to see it again.

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> {quote:title=AndyM108 wrote:}{quote}

> As for a specific movie, maybe you have to be a baseball fan to notice that in Bang The Drum Slowly, there's a scene where a popup is hit in one ballpark, but when it comes down and is caught, it's in a completely different park. Pretty sure that the two stadiums in question are Shea Stadium in New York and RFK Stadium in Washingon, but it's been nearly 40 years since I've seen the movie, and I have no inclination to see it again.

 

My problem with the movie BANG THE DRUM SLOWLY is completely different. Pitcher Henry Wiggen "wrote" a series of books with the help of Mark Harris. The first one was called The Southpaw for Henry was left handed.

 

Michael Moriarty played him right handed.

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> {quote:title=Janet0312 wrote:}{quote}Here's one for ya. You ever notice that when someone is coming home carrying a bag of groceries, that there is always the proverbial head of celery sticking out of the top of the bag? This happens in both television and film.

 

Yes, that's a common TV/movie trope, more commonly a bunch of carrots and bread at top of bag (greens of carrots look like celery, I guess):

 

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ISOStandardUrbanGroceries

 

Oh well, probably some film geek (not me) somewhere has compiled a list of examples of this in movies...

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You know you're a film geek when...

 

 

...you know all the obscure character actors by name.

 

 

...you announce to all in the room(who are already tired of hearing you), "Hey! Spencer Tracey had that SAME LAMP in another movie!"

 

 

...you can tell if the director of a movie you're watching copied the style of another director

 

 

...you can name all the movies Virginia Mayo and Steve Cochoran made together

 

 

...you can claim you've seen ALL the remakes of some movie, and can name ALL those in the casts

 

 

...you can, without seeing the opening credits, name who did the make-up, costumes and music

 

 

...you can relate who some actor or actresses SON is, and know what THEY do for a living

 

 

...you can inform who "they" wanted to get originally for the starring role

 

 

...you can say for a fact that "so-and-so" was DRUNK while filming some 30 second scene you just watched

 

 

...every one else in the room yells at you to "Shut UP already!"

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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You know you're an OLD film geek when:

 

You can't get through the day without checking this message board at least once, if not posting on it, because "no one else understands you".

 

You look at a news page of some current red carpet event and have no idea who the people are. Plus, everyone seems to look alike and blend together.

 

You can't stand the herky-jerky motions of modern filmmaking and think that more can be said in a five minute still shot of yesteryear than the slam-bang explosions of today's films.

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Thanks, Dargo.

 

 

Euginia, I too, am NOT a fan of that "hand-held" filming technique seen so frequently in action movies and TV dramas. I'm reminded of the times my jerkwad brother-in-law thought it was "cute" to have his then five-year-old son take over the video taping duties at family events.

 

 

The results looked pretty much the same. Perhaps he should sue somebody?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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:^0 I nearly get motion sickness trying to watch the "handheld camera" effect.

 

When I watch a movie a second time, after I'm already familiar with the plot, I love to look closely at backdrops and props, what people are wearing, etc. It's much easier to do this with older movies, when you can more or less "relax" more when you watch.

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My problem with the movie BANG THE DRUM SLOWLY is completely different. Pitcher Henry Wiggen "wrote" a series of books with the help of Mark Harris. The first one was called The Southpaw for Henry was left handed.

 

Michael Moriarty played him right handed.

 

 

Good point that slipped by me, though my biggest problem with BTDS is that it's a monumentally sappy movie, and that nearly all of the actors remind me of Paul Newman and Tom Cruise flailing spastically with a cue stick in The Color of Money. In terms of believability, they'd have been better off just teaching a couple of good sandlot teams how to read lines.

 

 

*WARNING: RANT ALERT*

 

I realize it's probably just me, but IMO if you're playing a baseball player, you should at least be able to give a semi-convincing rendition of how real players bat, throw and field. That's one of the reasons that Robert Ryan was so good in The Set-Up; he'd actually been a very good college boxer. Same reason that unlike Newman, Jackie Gleason was a very convincing performer in The Hustler -- he actually knew how to run more than two balls without ten camera takes.

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Is anyone else familiar with the Big White House? I swear, there is a big white house with pillars (columns?) that must have starred in more movies and TV shows than all the actors and actresses combined. From The Philadelphia Story to The Big Valley, this house has been everywhere. I can't think of all the movies now, but there is also that big spiral staircase that has been supporting (no pun intended) stars for years.

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

> You know you're a film geek when...

>

> ...you know all the obscure character actors by name.

>

Wow, that is my family right there. We watch movies and shout, "Yay, Mildred Natwick is in this!" or "Ok, there's Charles Lane, that means it's a real movie." But it's sad when we know these character actors really well. For example we were watching SGT YORK (for Veteran's Day--more geekiness) and this was spoken in our house: "Wow, Gary Cooper must be tall because I know Ward Bond is 6'4" and he's almost as tall as him." What a geeky thing to say. But that's pretty normal around these parts.

 

I thought of a few myself which all apply to me:

 

You know you're a film geek when...

 

...you specify which version of BEN-HUR you were watching the other day, and know the differences between them

...you know who Mitchell Leisen is and which movies he's done

...you insist there is a big difference between Billy Wilder's films that he directed and wrote versus the ones he merely wrote

...you scoff at people who say ROMAN HOLIDAY was Audrey Hepburn's film debut because, hello people, she had a bit part in THE LAVENDER HILL MOB

...you know what won best song for the year 1944

...you know who was married to who during what movie

...you have these soundtracks on your ipod right now: BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S, TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, VERTIGO, and THE GREAT RACE (to name a few)

...you remember what year a movie came out because you know what it beat or lost to at the Oscars

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Andy wrote: WARNING: RANT ALERT

I realize it's probably just me, but IMO if you're playing a baseball player, you should at least be able to give a semi-convincing rendition of how real players bat, throw and field.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

So Andy, I take it you found Tony Perkins in Fear Strikes Out a "little less" than believable also, eh?! ;)

 

(...man, that dude looked like the first time he ever picked up a ball, bat and/or glove was the first day of filming)

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I guess this time, method acting isn't quite what we imagine it. Maybe method means only how he feels playing baseball, not the actual ability..

 

I don't think I am much of film geek, though I do recognize some character actors and sometimes I can place a costume or a prop that is used in more than one production. I think that's trivial knowledge, but not geekiness,,?

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> {quote:title=AndyM108 wrote:}{quote}My problem with the movie BANG THE DRUM SLOWLY is completely different. Pitcher Henry Wiggen "wrote" a series of books with the help of Mark Harris. The first one was called The Southpaw for Henry was left handed.

>

> Michael Moriarty played him right handed.

>

> Good point that slipped by me, though my biggest problem with BTDS is that it's a monumentally sappy movie, and that nearly all of the actors remind me of Paul Newman and Tom Cruise flailing spastically with a cue stick in The Color of Money. In terms of believability, they'd have been better off just teaching a couple of good sandlot teams how to read lines.

>

>

> *WARNING: RANT ALERT*

>

>

> I realize it's probably just me, but IMO if you're playing a baseball player, you should at least be able to give a semi-convincing rendition of how real players bat, throw and field. That's one of the reasons that Robert Ryan was so good in The Set-Up; he'd actually been a very good college boxer. Same reason that unlike Newman, Jackie Gleason was a very convincing performer in The Hustler -- he actually knew how to run more than two balls without ten camera takes.

>

Interesting that Newman came up. He played Wiggen in the TV play, with Albert Salmi in the De Niro role. I don't remember if Newman played him as a lefty or not.

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> {quote:title=Dargo2 wrote:}{quote}Andy wrote: WARNING: RANT ALERT

> I realize it's probably just me, but IMO if you're playing a baseball player, you should at least be able to give a semi-convincing rendition of how real players bat, throw and field.

> -----

> So Andy, I take it you found Tony Perkins in *Fear Strikes Out* a "little less" than believable also, eh?! ;)

>

> (...man, that dude looked like the first time he ever picked up a ball, bat and/or glove was the first day of filming)

I used to say that I hated that movie because it was unbelievable that everyone on the RedSox had uniform numbers from 60 to 90 or so. One night this September I watch the Sawx play the Orioles and all the players did have abnormally high uniform numbers.

 

So I guess 55 years later the film is finally accurate.

 

BTW, Piersall used to curse at the mention that Perkins had played him in the movie.

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