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"Lincoln"


filmlover
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I just wanted to say that if you are going to a movie on Thanksgiving, a family tradition for many as popular as turkey, I wanted to recommend Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln." I saw it today (Wednesday) and it was amazing. If you like TV shows such as "The West Wing," I can pretty much guarantee you will like this.

 

Daniel Day-Lewis was wonderful, and it is pretty clear that he will be nominated for best actor (and the film for best picture). I have to admit that every once in a while, he looked like Ben Stiller as Lincoln, LOL. It is a sensitive, touching portrait. And Sally Field brings a lot of depth to the part of his wife.

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Thanks for posting that, FL.

As "classic" movie fans I think we have slightly different standards than the average movie-goer.

 

Although I loathe Spielberg, I always give his films a try. Your description almost sounds as if the performances overcome Spielberg's usual heavy handedness.

 

Very glad to hear Sally Field may have the chance to redeem herself as an actress. She's quite talented (but so often ridiculed) and I can absolutely picture her as Mary Todd Lincoln- a weird charactor in her own right.

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I'm really looking forward to seeing it but it's not at my "local" (10 miles away)theater, so it will involve some travel. I'm really curious to see such a complex historical figure "animated", so to speak. Doris Kearns Goodwin, whose "Team of Rivals" is a source for the movie, was on with John Stewart recently and she said he had a great sense of humor, which isn't necessarily something I would have expected. (Some of it pretty naughty, she said.) I'm a great admirer of Tony Kushner too, so I'm expecting a lot from the script. Like TikiSoo, I usually have mixed reactions to Spielberg, but overall, I think he's about as capable of being subtle as he is of being heavy-handed, so I'll certainly go with an open mind. Thanks for this reminder.

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> {quote:title=TikiSoo wrote:}{quote}Thanks for posting that, FL.

> Very glad to hear Sally Field may have the chance to redeem herself as an actress. She's quite talented (but so often ridiculed) and I can absolutely picture her as Mary Todd Lincoln- a weird charactor in her own right.

I don't think she needs to redeem herself as an actress. She inarguably deserved it for Norma Rae, she did nomination-worthy work in (I mean it) Soapdish ("I don't quite feel right in a turban...what I feel like is GLORIA F-ING SWANSON!") and (yes) Forrest Gump, and she's *kept working* and done some fantastic work in some unconventional films and TV projects (did you see the marvelous Spiderman redux?)

 

I don't follow the Oscarace so much anymore, but I'll be intrigued to see if she can be the first person to go three-for-three.

 

 

PS- don't entirely write off Senior Spielbergo just yet. I also am still angry about Crystal Skull, but I was watching Jaws for the N-thousandth time last night and reminded of the talent.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Nov 22, 2012 9:42 AM

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This movie mostly covers his later years as president during the Civil War which is well done (and already well known) but I was hoping they make a movie that included his early life starting from childhood to his early marraige when he lost his children.

 

Most people only knows his life from the Civil War era

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I've just seen it and also recommend it.

 

 

It's one I'm going to think about for a long time. I want to see it again when it comes to DVD to savor nuances.

 

 

I will say that I appreciate techniques used to represent the period such as dim lighting and faded and worn, rather than unwrinkled and brand new clothing. I appreciate the unvarnished-ness of the representations.

 

 

I agree with Lori that Daniel Day-Lewis was excellent and that James Spader was a standout.

 

 

Although I'm not a fan of Sally Field, I agree that she worked the part well.

 

 

I'm going to do some reading for "fact checks." I like films that inspire me to do that.

 

 

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filmlover wrote:"Jake,

 

Rex Reed? Really?

 

Try this:

 

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/moviesnow/la-et-mn-lincoln-review-20121109,0,7581480.story

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Well filmlover, maybe Rex was hopin' for somethin' more along the lines of, say...

 

Myra Breckinridge: Rail Splitter ???

 

(...ever think o' THAT?!)

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This is my first post, so I'd first like to say hello! We just got TCM a couple weeks ago to our small town (Canada), and I am thrilled with it! :)

 

About the new movie, "Lincoln", I was anxious to go see it until I looked it up on IMDB where it says the "F" word is used in the film. I will not watch anything with such language, but wondered if any of you, who have seen it, can verify if it was used?

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Lincoln uses the F word? ****! I may see it then! This is one of those movies that I put in the "I'll probably see it, but am not that interested category". I prefer to read my history. Maybe I'll be surprised. Of course it doesnt help that "You Like Me! You Really Like Me!" is in it.........To be honest, its not high on my list, whatever the critics may say.........I do like Joseph G-L (I hate hypenated names!), so that's a plus......

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For I word that is used only once, by James Spader (Bilbo) you are missing a great movie. Daniel Day-Lewis as others have said is outstanding, you feel like Lincoln is right there talking to you. The whole cast is superb even Sally Field. I have seen twice, and can't recommend it enough.

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There seem to be a lot of back-and-forth opinions about Sally Field in this. I, for one, believe that she is terrific as Mary Lincoln. She has only a few brief scenes, but she is believable as a mother who has recently lost a son. I would not be at all surprised if she receives an Oscar nomination.

 

 

 

 

 

Terrence.

 

 

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You know, jcp, I just might see it again in the theater, too.

 

 

As for the one use of "f," it's subtle as in there but barely audible.

 

 

To whomever it was who is concerned for their children's welfare if they hear this word in "Lincoln," I'd wager there's plenty of other things to worry about that will have a greater impact on your children in their formative years.

 

 

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*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}"I was hoping they make a movie that included his early life starting from childhood to his early marraige when he lost his children.{font}*

 

*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}Most people only knows his life from the Civil War era"{font}*

 

 

 

Actually, Abe and Mary lost just one child during the early years of their marriage, their second son Edward, in 1850 (he was born in 1846). Their third son, Willie, died at age 11 in 1862 during the war, when his parents had been married about 20 years; I'm not sure if this is covered in the movie or not since I haven't seen it yet. Their youngest son, Tad, only lived to be 18, but by the time he passed away around 1871, Lincoln was already dead.

 

BLU

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Lincoln loved Shakespeare. When he read/heard Constance's speech from King John, shortly after his child died, it is said he burst into tears. Here are excerpts from Constance's speech, in which she laments the death of her son:

 

"I am not mad: this hair I tear is mine;

My name is Constance; I was Geffrey's wife;

Young Arthur is my son, and he is lost:

I am not mad: I would to heaven I were!

For then, 'tis like I should forget myself:

O, if I could, what grief should I forget!

Preach some philosophy to make me mad,

And thou shalt be canonized, cardinal;

For being not mad but sensible of grief,

My reasonable part produces reason

How I may be deliver'd of these woes,

And teaches me to kill or hang myself:

If I were mad, I should forget my son,

Or madly think a babe of clouts were he:

I am not mad; too well, too well I feel

The different plague of each calamity.

 

And, father cardinal, I have heard you say

That we shall see and know our friends in heaven:

If that be true, I shall see my boy again;

For since the birth of Cain, the first male child,

To him that did but yesterday suspire,

There was not such a gracious creature born.

But now will canker-sorrow eat my bud

And chase the native beauty from his cheek

And he will look as hollow as a ghost,

As dim and meagre as an ague's fit,

And so he'll die; and, rising so again,

When I shall meet him in the court of heaven

I shall not know him: therefore never, never

Must I behold my pretty Arthur more.

Grief fills the room up of my absent child,

Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me,

Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words,

Remembers me of all his gracious parts,

Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form;

Then, have I reason to be fond of grief?

Fare you well: had you such a loss as I,

I could give better comfort than you do.

I will not keep this form upon my head,

When there is such disorder in my wit.

O Lord! my boy, my Arthur, my fair son!

My life, my joy, my food, my all the world!

My widow-comfort, and my sorrows' cure!"

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Very touching Swithin, thank you for sharing.

 

To lose a child has to be the most horrible "pain" one must endure in this life.

 

Tragically in all wars so many sons and daughters are lost.

 

I remember watching that PBS special by Ken Burns on the Civil War years ago, and when Lincoln was shot, the Dr. at the scene had to order to have Mrs.Lincoln removed. She was so hysterical.

 

I also remember that her eldest son, had her committed to a mental hospital later in her life.

 

Some people have the inner strength and faith to deal with such a loss, some people don't.

 

Lori

 

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=Hibi wrote:}{quote}Lincoln uses the F word? ****! I may see it then!

Actually one of the low lives uses it when Lincoln walks into his little shack. Lincoln does use the S word, which, being a farmboy, I think he would, and in a hilarious context.

 

I understand people who are bothered by language and therefore don't want to see movies with lots of language. I avoid R rated movies for that reason. But this really is worth it, seeing as how there is just the one F word, which you could cover your ears or leave the room for, if you take a friend who's seen the film. Even my dad went to see it, and to him PG-13 means "not gonna see it". But the bad language bothered him for days. Poor old sensitive dad.

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