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Off-Topic: Who We Are


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A poster has given us a short biography of himself in a thread which has become side-tracked into discussion of non-actor personalities.

 

It reminds me that we share much in our posts but it is always in bits and dabs here and there so it is difficult at times to assemble a complete image of our fellow posters. That this is true is evidenced by the fact that it happens often that a person will mistake the gender of a poster with whom they have discussed many things.

 

Some posters have introduced themself when first coming to this forum but it is nearly always very bare-bones and hesitant as they feel they are coming into a group of strangers.

 

I can not and will not ask nor expect any other person to provide information about themself and I surely will reveal no secrets about myself but I think it may be handy to have a single place with as much information as some posters are willing to share.

 

I will go first to inspire confidence and because I love to talk of myself. :)

 

I am female but please do not think that I am a girly-girl. It has been said of me often that I have a pair of big brass ones.

 

I was born in the upstairs-back-bedroom of a house which has since been torn down in Odessa, Ukraine. I will not say the year as my age is not important but I will give the clue that I was a young officer in the military when I met in 1972 the man who posts in this forum as Capuchin.

 

My uncle would tend me when my mother worked. He ran a movie house and he played mostly foreign movies so he was in trouble with the authorities often. I sat next to his projector.

 

It became a family joke that I could read a foreign language before I could speak because I would be very quiet all the time a movie played but I would begin to fuss the moment "Fin" appeared on the screen as if I knew it meant the movie was done. He became later a cameraman making documentaries for the government and he made short films of his own using their equipment and supplies. He gave me all rights to two of his movies in his will.

 

My father was concierge for a hotel for foreign visitors. They had a small theater and I would go there after school and watch foreign movies until he could take me home. My mother was tour guide and interpreter and she at times took me along to movies when the people had children so we could then flank the children so we would know if they left their seats.

 

I grew up in the remains of an elegant world made shabby by decades of the Soviet. Our first home that I remember was in a grand house which was split up for many families. I believe our part of it had once been the apartment of a butler and his family. I grew up believing the world was made of marble and dark woods and flaking gold leaf.

 

I learned English and German in school because I wished to know what was being said in many foreign films which I liked but which did not have subtitles. I choose the classes where we learned to understand and speak the languages but not to read nor write them. Those classes were said to be harder but there was a foreign movie each week and we had little written homework!

 

The military asked me to join when I graduated school and they sent me to University. I hoped to become a doctor but my hands were poor so I became a nuclear nurse. I have never been with patients other than what was required for my education and training. My primary job in the military was processing information for doctors, writing reports and checking preparations. I had many good postings because I could be listed as both administration and medical to meet personnel quotas. I traveled much also because I understood several languages.

 

The military taught me also to read and write English. I had little cause to write it but it opened for me the worlds of Shakespeare, Poe and P. G. Wodehouse.

 

I met Capuchin when his military and my military met for talks. Our superior officers did not like our romance and so we were separated.

 

My first husband was military and he died in an accident. My second husband was an expert in Japanese Cinema and we traveled there often as part of cultural exchanges. He died two weeks before our tenth anniversary.

 

In 2008 things were not going well for me. The company where I worked closed. I was living with my mother and working odd jobs. Capuchin brought me to United States. He does not have very much money but he employs me as his care-giver. He had full time care-givers before and there are times he would have to be in care facility for constant heart monitoring if he did not have me so it is legitimate employment.

 

I have also been going to school so that I can have licenses to practice as a nuclear nurse here. I have one partial and one full semester before that it possible. Next year it will be five years that I am here and so can begin the process to become a citizen. There are faster ways but there are peculiarities of the situation which make it safer to use the old-fashioned ways.

 

Capuchin made me join this forum so that it would be necessary for me to write more in English than is usual in my life. I am very grateful that all here have been patient with me as I know I often write as if I am a backwards child pecking at the keyboard.

 

I like mostly movies which are fun. I love to laugh and to feel silly. I like especially caper-comedies and crime-comedies of the 1930s and 1940s.

 

I prefer mostly non-American epics and personal dramas. I find the works of Akira Kurosawa, Sergei Bondarchuk and Hiroshi Inagaki are far richer than those of any American director. I find Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujiro Ozu and Grigori Aleksandrov made movies which touch my soul deeply.

 

I am sorry this is so very long but it takes much to explain me even although there may be no excuse for me. :)

 

Does any other person wish to share?

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Yeah, I'll share somethin' with ya here, Sans.

 

When you stated in this short but beautifully written autobiography here, "I know I often write as if I am a backwards child pecking at the keyboard.", all I could do was laugh, 'cause lady, YOUR English is clearly as good as MINE!

 

(...though that may not be sayin' all that much, seein' as how I'm a graduate of the American public school system!) ;)

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> {quote:title=Dargo2 wrote:}{quote}

> YOUR English is clearly as good as MINE!

 

I thank you for your kind words.

 

> (...though that may not be sayin' all that much, seein' as how I'm a graduate of the American public school system!) ;)

 

It should be easier for me than it is for you as I did it as special study and I was not distracted or confused by bad examples. I did not grow up reading the back of Corn Flakes boxes or notes passed in class. My first main exposure to written English was technical journals and classic literature. I should by these things have an excellent command of the language. It is sad to say I have a great disconnect between reading and writing and so I can look at what I write and know it is bad but I do not know how to fix it.

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> {quote:title=hamradio wrote:}{quote}

> On the internet, the LESS people knows about me the better.

 

I have a very long list of things I will not say. It begins with my name and where I live. Capuchin knows people who work in Internet security and I can ask them if a thing I wish to say can be used to trace who I am. They have saved me on two occasions by pointing out things I did not know were so unique as to be dangerous to say.

 

I wish to be as open as I can be but I know well that one must take care in this world and in the cyberworld.

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A very nice thread to start.

 

Thank you for your kind words. I appreciate it.

 

Well the day has passed where there is more than enough information about me on the Internet where if someone really wanted to locate me they could very easily.

 

I understand your desire to maintain secrecy involving your real name, but really if you are going to succeed in America, especially in the work force you will need to join groups like LinkedIn. A site where you will add info about yourself and the type of jobs you have held in the past.

 

There are many ways that anyone can find you. Unfortunately you make it sound like big black helicopters are out there right this minute searching for you. Once you have a social security number created for yourself, all bets are off.

 

They will find you if they want to.

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What a lovely post, SansFin. You humble me.

 

Such candor, such dignity. I love your connection to Capuchin, I did not know.

 

If only all the posters on all the message boards in all the world were like you.

 

But they're not.

 

Again, thank you for sharing.

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Not too much different to share here. Born in Massachusetts 84 years ago. My dad was a linotype operator on a newspaper; my mother Home District secretary to a congressman. He was the star in my life as I grew. He wrote the Wage and Hours Act of 1938 (minimum wage, 40 hour week, child labor laws). He put the guard on the tomb of the Uknown Soldier in 1926, before I was born. In 1928 I had my first ride in an airplane, with Charles Lindbergh. My mother was at the airport in Washington with Billy Connery (the congressman) and other members of the staff. Lindy was giving rides to the VIPs. He asked if Billy wanted a ride. Billy said, "No, but maybe Peggy does," and she said you bet. At the time she was eight months pregnant with me. So the two of us got to fly with Lindbergh.

 

My first great trauma was when Billy died in 1937, when I was eight. It affected me more than I can say. He was the most remarkable man, funny, gentle, making people laugh all the time. I've met people who have told me he actually made them fall off the chair laughing. I can picture it. He did that with us. He had been an actor before he went into politics. When he became a Member of the House of Representatives, he became the voice for all veterans. He loved them and worked hard for them all through his seven terms. He was the most idealistic man I've ever seen in politics. He died suddenly of a heart attack brought on by a stomach upset. He left our house one morning for the airport, after going over some work with my mother, and on the way to Washington he got sick. They met the plane with an ambulance and by early afternoon he was dead. His funeral procession was the longest military processiion ever seen on the east coast. Veterans came from all over the country, in wheelchairs, on crutches.

 

There were eight children in my family. A big, raucous gang. I was the second eldest. We went to parochial schools and learned well. I began working as a typist at the General Electric Co. After World War II, I was recruited to go to Washington as a "government girl." A stenographer. Lived there for some years and was married there. After five years my husband, a civilian with the government, was posted to Japan, with a layover of nine months in California, where I worked for a radio station. A pretty hilarious time. Three years in Tokyo, where I learned a little Japanese and had a great time. Next post was London for three years. We adopted two children, both babies, a boy and a girl, a year apart. Came back to the U.S. for home leave and then to Okinawa for five years.

 

Since then I've lived in San Diego and then Hawaii. I love Hawaii. I'll be here until I die, with any luck at all.

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> {quote:title=fxreyman wrote:}{quote}

> A very nice thread to start.

 

It is merely my response to your friendliness and openness in the other thread. I believe such things should not be buried in threads which are of different subjects and where they are not easy to find.

 

> There are many ways that anyone can find you. Unfortunately you make it sound like big black helicopters are out there right this minute searching for you.

 

It is not authorities which concern me. My copies of all the paperwork I have done for coming here and being here weighs now seven pounds. I believe it is possible that it contains even information whether my navel is an innie or an outie. A Sheriff's Deputy came to my home to tell me of an event I may wish to enter. An FBI Agent has sent me a birthday card.

 

My concern is for a person who takes great offense at a thing I write and they desire to bring the matter into the real world. I know of no way to stop those who are capable of hacking user accounts for information but the majority of them will be stymied if they are unable to discern a name or location in postings in various forums. One such person harassed Capuchin some years ago because of his presence in a Usenet group and it took much energy and the intervention of police to end it.

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> {quote:title=willbefree25 wrote:}{quote}

> What a lovely post

 

I thank you for your kind words.

 

> Such candor, such dignity.

 

My grandmother taught me that success in life depends on having the world seeing you as a graceful swan gliding across a pond while never letting them see that under the surface you are paddling for dear life.

 

> I love your connection to Capuchin, I did not know.

 

We have been in love for forty years. It has helped greatly that we saw little of each other for thirty-six of those years.

 

He says we have a strange and wonderful relationship: I am strange and he is wonderful.

 

> If only all the posters on all the message boards in all the world were like you.

 

I believe it would then be a very boring place. :)

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> {quote:title=RMeingast wrote:}{quote}

> I think if you go to the "Classic Film Union" listed under "Fan Community" on the menu board above and below "TCM Turner Classic Movies" at the top of the page, you can join the "Classic Film Union" and post your biography there.

 

I thank you for your suggestion.

 

There was an accident of some type which caused me to become a member of it. I had to ask that it be undone quickly because it meant receiving e-mails from strangers and that is a problem for me because of filtering.

 

It appears to me that it is a social networking site for people who like movies.

 

I prefer this forum as it is about movies first. I began this thread because I feel that it helps me to add perspective to a poster's opinions and suggestions if I know their age, gender and other basic facts and I believe there are others who feel the same way. The information on social sites such as the names of their pets, what they ate for lunch or where is their favorite place to vacation would not greatly add to that perspective and I feel it is a distraction.

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Wow, SansFin and Dothery make for a tough act to follow. Those were both amazing mini-bios, and thanks for sharing them.

 

Born on W110th St. in Manhattan in 1944, directly across from Morningside Park. My parents moved to DC in early 1951, where my Dad wrote a weekly newsletter for the Norwegian Information Service. My Mom was a patent secretary. And oh, I should mention that they were married in 1931 but waited 13 years before they had me. They didn't exactly have it easy in the 1930's, and I've got hundreds of letters that my Dad wrote my Mom from towns up and down the East Coast, where he'd hitchhiked to try to find work. He was partially blind and ineligible for the draft, but during WW2 he transmitted broadcasts from New York via short wave to the Norwegian underground. His Norwegian brother was betrayed by the Quislings and executed, an account of which was given in David Howarth's classic book, We Die Alone.

 

Got into Duke University due to a letter of recommendation from my high school baseball coach, but once there, I got wrapped up in the civil rights movement and never played ball after my freshman year. Worked as a SNCC organizer in Cambridge MD for about a year and a half, which to date remains the formative experience of my life. The first person I met there was an 11 year old kid who went from being one of the first black students to attend a "white" school in Cambridge, to becoming the head of the New York State Banking Commission under the first Governor Cuomo.

 

After finally graduating with no honors whatsoever five years later, I drove a cab and then worked as an editorial assistant for one of my all-time heroes, the independent radical journalist I. F. Stone. He and my father shared the same printer, which is how they got to know one another and how I wound up lucking into that job. The sort of skills I learned from "Izzy" can't be quantified, but they included the development of an acquired instinct for not taking first reports of a news event to heart without getting independent confirmation. It's an instinct that's highly useful in nearly every context.

 

After Izzy, I wound up doing community organzing in Durham, NC, then after I got disillusioned with the bureaucracy there I worked as a courier and then as a freelance bootleg movie exhibitor. My ex-GF and I showed Reefer Madness before anyone else, and also pioneered the screening of old TV shows on college campuses. Unfortunately once the stations started cashing in on the "nostalgia" craze by showing re-runs themselves, that was the end of our little business. And they never even thanked us for doing their market research for them. B-)

 

After that, I wound up being a book buyer for a chain of used book stores in Washington, but after 6 years of growing disgust with the owner's shady business practices, I opened my own shop in 1984, where I met my wife (she was my best customer, so I'll always suspect ulterior motives) and had a great time for 23 years. As Izzy Stone said about himself, I've had so much fun that I ought to be arrested.

 

So now I've got two poster websites to help keep me solvent, a lot of time to read and watch movies and pursue my other great love, which is competitive nine ball. Unfortuantely my three greatest loves in life (cheap baseball games, used book shops and pool rooms) are all on the way out, but at least I can be grateful that my major form of entertainment when I was young wasn't just a little hand-held device to take my mind off everything else. There's something to be said for the concept of addition by subtraction. :)

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> {quote:title=Dothery wrote:}{quote}

> Not too much different to share here.

 

I love what you wrote! It shows well your great wit and gentle nature. I am very much impressed!

 

I know now to pay special attention when you write of movies you may have seen first while you were living in Japan and England. I feel it adds much to a person's perspective when they watch movies with an audience of the people for whom the movie was made.

 

I thank you very, very much for sharing! :)

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> {quote:title=SansFin wrote:}{quote}

> I thank you for your suggestion.

>

> There was an accident of some type which caused me to become a member of it. I had to ask that it be undone quickly because it meant receiving e-mails from strangers and that is a problem for me because of filtering.

>

> It appears to me that it is a social networking site for people who like movies.

>

> I prefer this forum as it is about movies first. I began this thread because I feel that it helps me to add perspective to a poster's opinions and suggestions if I know their age, gender and other basic facts and I believe there are others who feel the same way. The information on social sites such as the names of their pets, what they ate for lunch or where is their favorite place to vacation would not greatly add to that perspective and I feel it is a distraction.

 

 

No problem. Just a suggestion. I don't know much about the Classic Film Union myself.

 

As for personal information on this message board, you have to remember that most users here are anonymous and so can post anything about themselves, whether true or not.

That's something to be aware of too. And there's usually no way to verify personal information from an anonymous user on this message board.

So the information you're interested in from other users, that they post, may not be true at all and you need to be aware of that.

I use my real name but I'm also aware that's not a very good idea to do that on the Internet and that I open myself to spam and other problems from sick individuals, etc...

That's also something users need to remember before posting personal information about themselves. These messages are on the Internet and sick individuals can use any personal information posted, no matter if the original intent of posting the information was innocent.

Anyway, just something to think about and for all other users of the message board to think about as well.

 

BTW, I use my real name and often post personal information because I'm a nobody and don't care.

But that's just me. Others may want to be more careful, I don't know? Just FYI...

 

A recent example in the news concerns the Duke of Cambridge having posted photos and information on the Internet with the innocent intention of allowing people to see what he does during the day.

But the photos were quickly deleted afterward due to security concerns.

The Duke and his wife didn't realize that potentially sick people would use the information for something negative.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/prince-william/9690892/A-royal-farce-Palace-forced-to-remove-Duke-of-Cambridge-pictures-after-security-blunder.html

 

Most of us aren't as famous as the Duke Cambridge, but the same principle applies nevertheless about what people should post on the Internet about themselves.

 

I have posted personal information to friends here on the message board by PM (Private Message) that I wouldn't share on the message board itself, for another example.

 

Oh well...

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Wow. I can't compete with any of that. Yeah, I know it's NOT a competition, but you all know what I mean.

 

 

On the other hand, mine was a pretty much unremarkable upbringing. Typically(somewhat) American.

 

 

When MY mother was five or six months pregnant with ME (1951), she found out my bio-dad loved being married so much, he took on a SECOND wife. When she found out, she confronted him. He then made the mistake of telling her, "Don't make me CHOOSE between the two of you." The story goes that she informed him that SHE already chose FOR him, letting him know that the smouldering pile of rubbish in the alley behind the house was all of his clothes!

 

 

While I never met the man, I was told by my older brother, who went to live with him for a few years, that I wasn't missing much.

 

 

So I was raised by a single mother for the first eight years of my life. My Mom remarried to a man my Grandfather knew at the Cadillac plant he worked. He wheedled him to come in for a cup of coffee when the guy drove him to our house after work. Grandpa then introduced him to Mom, and the rest is history, as they say. The cool thing was that he was the uncle of a friend me and my brother had who lived around the block!

 

 

It did become exasperating that I, a nine year old school student, would have to explain to my teachers, who were SUPPOSED to be educated, WHY my Mother's last name was different from mine! Duh!

 

 

The man who became my step-father was immediately called "Dad" without any hesitation or apprehension. I never once tossed that stupid retort "YOU'RE not my REAL father!" when in disagreement with him over the years, because for all fact and purpose, he WAS my "real" father, more so than the bigamist my mom threw out before I was born. I could never understand other kids in similar situations using that argument. And besides, he was a really nice guy. I used to joke with people that he was a nice guy up until I was 13 or so. THEN he became a real jerk, and stayed a jerk until I was about 19 or 20. Then he became a nice guy again. They understood it was ME, becoming a typically rebellious kid at 13 who was the REAL jerk in the story.

 

 

What of any of this has to do with my love of old movies?

 

 

None of it, actually.

 

 

It DOES have something to do with the course my musical tastes have taken, though. My Mom was a "swing" and "big band" fan, and had several old 78s of those types of music in the house. I was fascinated by the "phonograph" for some reason, and would spend many an hour on rainy or cold winter days spinning these records, listening to the music, reading the labels and such. When she remarried, a step sister(one of three)came to live with us for a couple of years, and SHE had a great collection of early rock'n'roll, country and rock-a-billy records that she didn't mind my going ahead and listening to as long as I handled them carefully. She also had several blues recordings that I liked. I already liked blues, but the story behind that is another one for another day. PLUS she played guitar a little, and started me off on that by showing me a few chords and finger styles. It's surely the reason I, a lefty, play guitar right handed.

 

 

As how most kids grow up generally in one area have local "customs" and slang and preferrence for activity, having step siblings who lived in another community introduced me to the different ways other people live. Until then, I thought ALL people were pretty much the same all over. That other kids anywhere else all played the same games by the same rules. And I found out that it isn't neccessarily true. I discovered that some of the things the kids did "over there" were more fun than the stuff WE did in our neck of the woods. I suppose that's where I learned "VIVA LE DIFFERENCE!"

 

 

I also believe that's what helped me adjust to major changes later in life. I discovered that many people I knew, my ex-wife included, had difficulty adjusting and settling into new family environments when their new spouse is also previously divorced. The rift caused by my ex's not being able to adjust to the ways of her second husband's family caused THAT relationship to crumble. She asked me once how I managed it, and I suppose I could have told her, "Well, I kinda grew UP that way." She grew up in a typically nuclear "Leave it to Beaver" family situation. Kids from "broken homes" were to be avoided and all that nonsense.

 

 

I noticed that I'm rambling a bit here, so I'll end this by saying that I got used to many different people in many differing situations and from all walks of life. I made many poor and often disasterous choices in my time, but somehow I think much of this background made me able to take it all in stride and not sweat the small stuff. I don't think I'm better than most everybody, and also not worse. My wife tells me I have a natural "Assisian" type personality, and until I re-read that addage from St. Francis of Assisi, had no idea what she meant. My guess is somewhere along the long line, I must have recieved advice of that nature from somewhere.

 

 

I also try hard to live up to the advice my grandmother, a wiser woman than her education would indicate, gave me as a quote from a source she had long forgotten...

 

 

"My life is in the hands of any fool who can cause me to lose my temper."

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

> On the other hand, mine was a pretty much unremarkable upbringing.

 

It does not seem typical in that you recognized and embraced the differences between communities. I believe most people grow up within far narrower confines or they are unable to see the good in things which are unfamiliar to them as you did.

 

> "My life is in the hands of any fool who can cause me to lose my temper."

 

That is a wonderful quote and your grandmother was a very wise woman. I find that sentiment is true particularly when dealing with obstreperous posters! :)

 

I thank you very much for sharing.

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I know now to pay special attention when you write of movies you may have seen first while you were living in Japan and England. I feel it adds much to a person's perspective when they watch movies with an audience of the people for whom the movie was made.

 

 

I saw a movie in Tokyo which had in the lead a very ruggedly handsome actor named Tetsuro Tamba, playing a gangster. The reason we went to see it was that we had a friend, an American girl, who had been hired to play a part in it. We didn't understand much of the movie, since there weren't any subtitles, but we did understand Lavene's part, since it was in English and spoken very very slowly, which was pretty funny to us. We giggled a lot between coughs. You could barely see the screen for the smoke. The place could have been on fire and no one would have noticed.

 

Fast forward a couple of years to a trip to the Tower of London, when we had been posted there. We had two little ones, so I went alone while my husband baby-sat. As I was standing in line I looked at the man in front of me. I was a little jolted to see it was Tamba, and I asked a man who was with him if were he, to be sure. He said yes it was, and said they were there looping dialogue for "The Seventh Dawn," a movie he had made with William Holden and Capucine. He introduced me to him. I explained that I'd recognized him because I'd seen the picture, and he was amazed. After we chatted a few minutes the line began to move and I made my goodbyes, but he asked if I would go with them as they toured. They didn't really know what they were looking at there. I of course agreed and went along. The Tudors are my special hobby, and I knew quite a bit about the Tower. We spent the afternoon going through the buildings and walking outside afterward. During that walk we talked about a story called "Hoichi The Earless," a Japanese ghost story.

 

About a year or two later my husband and I (back in the States by then) saw a movie called "Kwaidan," and lo and behold (don't you love it when people say that?), there was Tamba, playing a ghost in armor come to take Hoichi to play his biwa for the spirits. "Kwaidan" is a glorious picture, beautifully photographed. Later I found Tamba had been in a gazillion movies ... they say he never turned down a role ... among them some of the great Japanese classics. I've caught some of them on Netflix from time to time. He was remarkable. He played Tiger Tanaka in "You Only Live Twice," a James Bond movie, also. Here he is:

http://www.google.com/search?q=tiger+tanaka&hl=en&tbo=u&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ei=tMmyUP-EMKTrigLoroDABw&sqi=2&ved=0CDYQsAQ&biw=1274&bih=602

 

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Worked as a SNCC organizer in Cambridge MD for about a year and a half, which to date remains the formative experience of my life. The first person I met there was an 11 year old kid who went from being one of the first black students to attend a "white" school in Cambridge, to becoming the head of the New York State Banking Commission under the first Governor Cuomo.

 

 

I love your bio. It amazes me how people's lives always hold some gems of information you'd never get anywhere else. I also envy your used book store experience. I'd have loved it myself, except like the candy store where I ate up all the fudge and gained 19 pounds, I think I'd have sat around reading all the books and not selling anything or organizing them.

 

You say you have poster websites? Would you tell us what they are? Or is it a breach of social media etiquette to ask?

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I love your bio. It amazes me how people's lives always hold some gems of information you'd never get anywhere else.

 

I'm pretty sure that only modesty prevents a lot more people from sharing their lives here. All in all, this is about as impressive a group of people as I've seen in any internet forum. And while I understand why some people may be reticent about revealing personal information, I doubt if "the government" is too likely to come after schlumps like me.

 

I also envy your used book store experience. I'd have loved it myself, except like the candy store where I ate up all the fudge and gained 19 pounds, I think I'd have sat around reading all the books and not selling anything or organizing them.

 

 

Well, I have managed to accumulate a pretty damn good book collection, but to stay in the black for 23 years with DC area commercial rents takes a lot more work than some people might imagine. I worked 7 days a week for the first 2 years and 6 days a week for the next 21, with time out only for a two week honeymoon and a second one on our sixth anniversary. If I didn't love what I was doing I would have picketed myself. ;)

 

 

You say you have poster websites? Would you tell us what they are? Or is it a breach of social media etiquette to ask?

 

 

Well, I'm certainly not offended. B-)

 

 

The first site contains nothing but college football posters: [www.historicfootballposters.com|http://www.historicfootballposters.com/]

 

 

And the second site is a mixture of historic political images and a bit of anything else that strikes my fancy, including all the dust jacket images from the Federal Writers Project state guide series. [www.georgetownbookshop.com|http://www.georgetownbookshop.com/posters.asp]

 

 

And there's also a third site which is identical to the second one, but directed at teachers and students with a discounted rate: [www.postersforclassrooms.com|http://www.postersforclassrooms.com/posters/]

 

 

Given your background and apparent interests, I suspect you'd enjoy browsing those last two sites. Although the images date back from the 1850's through the 1960's, we all know that history tends to repeat itself on a fairly regular basis.

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> {quote:title=AndyM108 wrote:}{quote}

> I opened my own shop in 1984, where I met my wife (she was my best customer, so I'll always suspect ulterior motives) and had a great time for 23 years.

 

I have great respect for people who open book shops. I know it is a labor of love. They say that love is blind and when it applies to book shops it is plain that love is blind to financial realities.

 

Your work with I. F. Stone must have been inspirational as well as educational.

 

I thank you very much for sharing!

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> {quote:title=Dothery wrote:}{quote}

> I saw a movie in Tokyo which had in the lead a very ruggedly handsome actor named Tetsuro Tamba, playing a gangster.

 

He was very active and I remember seeing him in many things. I like in particular the work he did with Nobuo Nakagawa. I have not seen it in many years now but I remember well liking very much *The Depths* (1957).

 

I thank you for sharing such a wonderful experience.

 

I must wonder if I am the only person who does not have a connection with a famous person. I have had no contact with great aviators, politicians, editors or actors.

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Your work with I. F. Stone must have been inspirational as well as educational.

 

I'll never forget my last meeting with "Izzy", which was only a few months before he passed, and 20 years after I'd worked for him.

 

After I opened my book shop, he used to sell me his review copies about once a year, and in early 1989 I brought my new GF and future wife over to meet him. She was adopted as an infant by an American couple from a German orphanage, and when that somehow came up in the conversation, Izzy just closed his eyes and began reciting a Rilke love poem in perfect German, a poem that he said he'd learned and memorized as a small child. Needless to say, my future wife was blown away by the gesture, and it's stuck with me ever since.

 

At that same meeting, he said that he was going to get an operation that would restore much of his by then nearly blinded eyesight, and was looking forward to renewing his ancient Greek studies with renewed vigor, freed from the need for a special computer with giant magnified type. (He had just turned 81 the previous Christmas Eve, and was still giving lectures on his Socrates book.) But alas, just a few months later, he died of a heart attack while preparing a lecture in Boston. Next to my own father, he's the greatest man I've ever known.

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Don't worry, Sans. You're not the only one without a connection to someone famous. The most famous people I ever met were the late Michigan governor George Romney(yep, Father of Mitt), who only shook my hand and said "Glad to meet you, kid." . That was when I was 13.

 

 

The other was guitarist Earl Klugh, through a friend of mine who is also a jazz guitarist. It was a few years before Klugh made it, and today I can confidently state that he wouldn't know me from Adam!

 

 

Sepiatone PS: Oh, and I once shook John McLaughlin's hand while in a group of autograph seekers. I insisted "The LEFT hand, sir!" and he smilingly obliged.

 

 

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AndyM, thanks for the websites. I've bookmarked them and will browse through them at leisure.

 

I'm reminded (sadly) of the huge Boston fire at the Coconut Grove night club whenever I see football memorabilia of the era. It was November 28, 1942. My sister and brother-in-law (then her boyfriend) were nearly in it. If Boston College hadn't lost to Holy Cross in such a crushing defeat, they probably would have been killed. B.C. and Holy Cross had had their traditional Thanksgiving game, and B.C. had planned its victory party for the Coconut Grove. They had planned to have the party even if they lost, but it was canceled, as B.C lost by such a huge score, 55-12. The B.C. team and fans went across the street to the Statler to the Holy Cross party instead. During the evening the Coconut Grove caught fire and nearly 500 people died in it. A horrendous tragedy. We could only thank God that our particular loved ones had been spared, just because of that score.

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