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Missing Christmas movies on TCM


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While I am content with the offerings this year, I will add that, after three or four years of exposure on TCM, I finally came to appreciate Albert Finney's *Scrooge* and am sad that it isn't part of the line-up this year. Oh well....

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I just saw part of HOLIDAY INN on the Encore Family premium channel and it's scheduled at least two or three more times this month. It seems that when it comes to Christmas classics, more and more cable channels are willing to bid for them and sometimes it's not TCM who gets them.

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> It seems that when it comes to Christmas classics, more and more cable channels are willing to bid for them and sometimes it's not TCM who gets them.

 

Mark,

 

Perhaps we can deduce: TCM's holiday classics were so successful that other channels went "wow, maybe we need to get a piece of that action?".

 

As long as there are baby boomers, classic holiday movies will have a place on television and maybe as our legacy, we can pass that tradition on to the next generations!

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*"I just saw part of HOLIDAY INN on the Encore Family premium channel and it's scheduled at least two or three more times this month."* - markfp2

 

Thank you for posting this last night. I came upon your message just before the film started out here on the West Coast. Having been bored by *Lost In America* for nearly an hour last night, I was thankful for something more palatable.

 

And additional thanks are due because I found out that EncoreFamily is also showing the unique animated film *The Illusionist* this month. (It ran after *Holiday Inn*.) This is a film of an unproduced Jacques Tati script and played the festival circuit a few years ago. I watched about 30 minutes and enjoyed it very much. I hope to catch the whole thing at a more reasonable hour later this month.

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

>

> Mark,

>

> Perhaps we can deduce: TCM's holiday classics were so successful that other channels went "wow, maybe we need to get a piece of that action?".

>

 

 

Your're absolutely right, Lynn. Still, I think big part of it was the result of Warner Bros. gaining control of the TCM film library. Since then, Warner has became very agressive in marketing those films to other networks.

 

It's very common to see films that were once exclusively on TCM on other channels. Just look at the night before Thanksgiving when AMC ran GONE WITH THE WIND at the same time as TCM. While I can understand how neither had exclusive rights to it, the scheduling seemed very odd to me. That kind of thing never would have happened when Ted was in charge of the library and especially with THAT film..

 

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It doesn't mke sense that TCM isn't showing Holiday Inn when they have the rights to it. I can see why they don't play White Christmas. They also have the rights to Christmas in Connecicut but chose not to play it and as for Good sam maybe last years showing was a one time deal. Just sms righgt to show all Christmas movies arounf holiday season.

 

 

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> It doesn't mke sense that TCM isn't showing Holiday Inn when they have the rights to it. (snip) hey also have the rights to Christmas in Connecicut but chose not to play it and as for Good sam maybe last years showing was a one time deal.

 

We have to remember that TCM doesn't own the Turner Film library any more (and hasn't since the late 1990s), so they don't have the rights to the films from their former film library.

 

Those rights are controlled by Warner Brothers and TCM has to rent all the films they broadcast. If Warners has rented holiday films to other cable channels, there's nothing TCM can do about that.

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Unbelievable! The original *Miracle on 34th Street* with Edmund Gwenn is scheduled to be shown TWENTY-TWO times on "That-Channel-Which-Must-Not-Be-Named"! And the 1994 remake with Richard Attenborough is scheduled to be shown SIX times!

 

I wonder how they missed airing the 1973 made-for-television version with Sebastian Cabot?

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When discussing Christmas movies, people rarely seem to think of the great British contributions of 'holiday" films.

Besides the 1952 *Scrooge*, aka *A Christmas Carol*, starring the inimitable Alistair Sim, which is indisputably the best filmed version of this Dickens story there is ( yeah, yeah, "in my opinion"...). there are several others worth watching, notably *The Holly and the Ivy* (1952), starring Ralph Richardson, Celia Johnson, Margaret Leighton, and Denhom Elliot. It's very good, quite Chirstmassy, and "different" from American Christmas fare. Not better or worse, just different.

 

Also- I really wish TCM could get a hold of this:

*A Child's Christmas in Wales*, 1987. Denholm Elliot again ! (I'm not doing a Denhom Elliot promotion here, it's just a coincidence .) This is a wonderfully sweet little film version of the Dylan Thomas autobiographical reminiscence. It's sweet, but not at all cloying or sentimental. And it's good fun, what with the kid trying to be tough with his candy cigarettes, the ghostly carol singing, and the inebriated uncles singing and dancing. And the final scene, with "All Through the Night" sung by lovely Welsh singers, never fails to move me to tears.

 

Here's a link to some more info about it:

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0172238/

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Dec 2, 2012 10:53 PM

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> {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> We have to remember that TCM doesn't own the Turner Film library any more (and hasn't since the late 1990s), so they don't have the rights to the films from their former film library.

>

> Those rights are controlled by Warner Brothers and TCM has to rent all the films they broadcast. If Warners has rented holiday films to other cable channels, there's nothing TCM can do about that.

>

 

I've never figured out why people have such a hard time understanding that fact, (especially those who have frequented these boards for years.)

 

 

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There is a plethora( I like that word!) of Holiday movies made over the last 70 or so years that TCM could show, and likely might, BESIDES all of the usual suspects. Some of you mentioned a few. It's still early yet. Let's wait to see what happens.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=markfp2 wrote:}{quote}

> > {quote:title=lzcutter wrote:}{quote}

> > We have to remember that TCM doesn't own the Turner Film library any more (and hasn't since the late 1990s), so they don't have the rights to the films from their former film library.

> >

> > Those rights are controlled by Warner Brothers and TCM has to rent all the films they broadcast. If Warners has rented holiday films to other cable channels, there's nothing TCM can do about that.

> > I've never figured out why people have such a hard time understanding that fact, (especially those who have frequented these boards for years.)

Perhaps people have trouble understanding the arrangement because both TCM and the former Turner film library are owned by Warner Brothers. While I'm sure that you're right (lzcutter) that TCM has to rent the former Turner films, they're paying their own parent company for the rights. I guess it's all a matter of budgeting within a large conglomerate, with TCM having a certain budget to pay for films -- even to its own parent company -- and Warner needing to realize revenue from renting out its films, whether to TCM or competing channels.

 

But no matter how you look at it, when TCM rents a film from the Warner/Turner film library, it's Warner taking money out of one of its own pockets and putting it in another. So I can understand why some folks don't see TCM renting Warner films in the same way that they see TCM renting, say, Fox films.

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:

> }{quote}When discussing Christmas movies, people rarely seem to think of the great British contributions of 'holiday" films.

> Besides the 1952 *Scrooge*, aka *A Christmas Carol*, starring the inimitable Alistair Sim...

 

 

And not to forget the 1935 version, starring Seymour Hicks. One of my favorite versions (along with Mister Magoo's version).

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> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:

> }{quote}When discussing Christmas movies, people rarely seem to think of the great British contributions of 'holiday" films.

>

> Besides the 1952 *Scrooge*, aka *A Christmas Carol*, starring the inimitable Alistair Sim, which is indisputably the best filmed version of this Dickens story there is ( yeah, yeah, "in my opinion"...). there are several others worth watching, notably *The Holly and the Ivy* (1952), starring Ralph Richardson, Celia Johnson, Margaret Leighton, and Denhom Elliot. It's very good, quite Chirstmassy, and "different" from American Christmas fare. Not better or worse, just different. ...

As a Christmas-movie aficionado, I would love to see THE HOLLY AND THE IVY. Ralph Richardson and Celia Johnson are two of my favorite British actors, and the holiday theme always interests me. TCM had THE HOLLY AND THE IVY on its December schedule a year or two ago but then substituted another movie at the last moment. I believe that "tcm programmer" told us here that there was a rights issue, and they couldn't be sure that it was OK to show the film. I really hope they get another chance, because I've only heard good things about the movie.

 

> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:

>

> }{quote}*...* Also- I really wish TCM could get a hold of this:

> *A Child's Christmas in Wales*, 1987. Denholm Elliot again ! (I'm not doing a Denholm Elliot promotion here, it's just a coincidence .) This is a wonderfully sweet little film version of the Dylan Thomas autobiographical reminiscence. It's sweet, but not at all cloying or sentimental. And it's good fun, what with the kid trying to be tough with his candy cigarettes, the ghostly carol singing, and the inebriated uncles singing and dancing. And the final scene, with "All Through the Night" sung by lovely Welsh singers, never fails to move me to tears. ...

Let me second that -- A CHILD'S CHRISTMAS IN WALES is a beautiful movie and would be a great, if somewhat more contemporary, addition to the TCM holiday season schedule. If you're so inclined, however, the movie is available on DVD. I'm glad that I made the purchase -- it's one of the more memorable Christmas movies I've seen.

 

Of course, you could also read Dylan Thomas's original story, or listen to his reading of it, which is available on CD. I'll never forget the time that my freshman English professor, during our last college class before winter break, planned to play the Dylan Thomas record (back in the days of record players). It was a snowy morning in December, just perfect for sitting down to hear the great poet read his Christmas story. Well, we all assembled in the small classroom, and our professor, a wonderful, soft-spoken guy, set up the record player but just couldn't get it to work. He finally gave up on the record player, probably realizing we were running out of time to hear the full reading, and offered to read the story aloud to us himself. One of our classmates, not catching herself, gave out with a very audible, "Oh no!" Everyone, including the professor, burst out laughing. The embarrassed classmate apologized profusely, telling the professor that she'd love to hear him read, but was just disappointed at missing out on the Thomas reading. The professor said, with a smile, that he understood, and then went on to give a wonderfully expressive reading of Thomas's story. I later heard Thomas's own reading, which was great, but I have to say that my professor's unplanned reading is the one that I remember most fondly.

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Mr. :) musicalnovelty: A very nice alternative, although Alastair knocks it out of the park, every time.

 

Have you seen One Magic Christmas? Also a nice minor Christmas movie.

 

Have you bought Magoo's Christmas Carol, rather than watch it, edited, on television? You should, since you'll see the beginning and the end, which demonstrates that he was starring in a play and which the idiots on television have seen fit to edit for many years so they could jam in another crummy commercial.

 

Speaking of which, Christmas Story, not on TBS, is always delightful.

 

 

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