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Theme Songs


MilesArcher

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Throughout the 1950s, there was a song often heard on radio, quite popular, sung by a chorus of voices. It was identified as having been used in an early 50s movie. Ala "Bob Hope -- Thanks/ Memory", this music was often played by the orchestra when a certain actress was introduced in a TV program. In effect, her personal theme. I was well into my forties before I ever saw the movie on a VHS. To my surprise, the movie lyrics of the song was quite different from what had become the radio standard.

 

Per radio:

♫ Whenever we kiss, I worry and wonder.

You lay very close; Darling where is your heart?...♫

 

Per the script:

♫ It's Springtime again, and lovers are lining

The banks of the Seine in the sun and the rain...♫

 

The movie? The song title? The lady who sang the song in the movie, and whose theme the song became?

 

 

 

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It gets a little complicated. IMDB says it's "It's April Again" from the song "Le Long De La Seine". The popular version we hear on the radio is called "Where Is Your Heart?", or just "Theme From Moulin Rouge". It was performed by Zsa Zsa Gabor, dubbed of course, in the movie "Moulin Rouge" in 1952. Here it is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLyKbOtASHA

 

Here is version you may be more familiar with.

 

 

 

Edited by: MilesArcher on Jan 1, 2013 8:22 PM

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Correct, Miles. I worked from memory rather than net-tracing. The Norman Luboff recording is the one I listened to for years. Somewhere I picked up the info that the title was The Theme from The Molin Rouge, a movie. I noted that that opening was played when Gabor walked on camera for a TV show. A classmate who sang that song for a talent show told me that Zsa Zsa had a role in the source movie. That was the first example I thought of when this thread was launched.

 

Miles' thread.

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Here's one that I posted about some time ago in another thread, so if you've been following my posts, this will be an easy one. Tommy Dorsey's theme song was featured in a forties movie that Tommy had nothing to do with. It was a popular song that was sung in the movie by a young woman whose movie career was very limited. She did, however, sing with a big band and do a lot of stage work. Later, she appeared on television. She was best known for a recurring role in a popular sitcom of the seventies and eighties, where she played the mother of one of the leading characters. Can you name Tommy Dorsey's theme song, the movie that I referred to, and the actress/singer who performed it?

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Tommy Dorsey's theme song, "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You", was featured in the movies "Du Barry Was a Lady", "Ship Ahoy", and "The Fabulous Dorseys", all involving the band leader. In a scene in the Abbott and Costelo movie, "Keep 'Em Flying", it was sung by Carol Bruce at the Manila Club. Except for the song, the movie had nothing to do with Tommy Dorsey. Carol Bruce later had a recurring role in the TV show "WKRP In Cincinnati" as Mama Carlson, the owner whose son ran the radio station.

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That's 100 % correct. Here's something that I posted back in May.

 

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}Carol Bruce played station owner Mama Carlson on "WKRP In Cincinnati". Mama Carlson was the mother of "the Big Guy", Arthur Carlson, played by Gordon Jump. Early in her career, Carol Bruce was a band singer with Larry Clinton's orchestra. She appeared in a few movies in the early forties, including "Keep 'Em Flying". After the war, she appeared on Broadway in a revival of' "Oklahoma". Here's her clip."{font}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}That's former singing cowboy Dick Foran matched up with Carol. If you're confused by Martha Raye's appearance, let me explain that Martha played twins with very different personalities. Of course, early in the movie, Bud and Lou don't realize that there are two sisters. Early in the movie, Carol also sings "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You", which was Tommy Dorsey's theme song. You'll see that if you watch the clip all the way through.{font}{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}

{font}

I guess Destry rides again. You're up, Tom.

 

 

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Tony Martin had a hit with this famous theme song which has been featured in many movies including one starring Humphrey Bogart, another starring Tyrone Power, and another one starring Marlene Dietrich. The song was also in a movie starring Kevin Costner and was in the soundtrack of a Doris Day movie. It was the main theme of the biographical movie about the singer who popularized the song.

 

Name the title of the theme song and the artist whose name is almost synonymous with the song. For extra points, you can name the titles of the movies mentioned above.

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Well, I waited a couple of days and nobody answered, so I'll jump in. The song is "La Vie En Rose". It was the signature song of Edith Piaf. It can be heard in various forms in:

 

"Stage Fright" with Marlene Dietrich

"Sabrina" with Humphrey Bogart

"The Eddy Duchin story" with Tyrone Power

"Bull Durham" with Kevin Costner

 

and in the soundtrack of "By The Light Of The Silvery Moon" with Doris Day.

 

Here is Edith Piaf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks. Glenn Miller and his orchestra had a hit record with a song that was written by a pianist who was with another band. Later, that pianist formed his own band and used that same song as his own theme song. Can you name the song and the composer/pianist?

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The pianist and former bandleader Frankie Carle (Francis Nuncio Carlone, not Corleone) composed "Sunrise Serenade", which became his theme song and was a hit for Glenn Miller. His band's vocalist, before he started performing solo, was his daughter, Marjorie Hughes.

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Thanks, Miles. Now these are two different songs with the same title.

 

In the 1950s, Eddie Fisher had a hit song from a movie starring Fred Astaire. A bandleader, who was in a few earlier movies himself, had a theme song which had the same title as the Eddie Fisher hit but was an entirely different song, with a different melody, lyrics, and composer. It was played in one of his films as a theme and background music..

 

What is the title of the two songs? Name the band and its leader. Name the movie where the bandleader's theme song appeared, and also the Fred Astaire movie in which Eddie Fisher's hit song was performed....

 

Edited by: tomdestry on Jan 13, 2013 10:29 PM

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The title of the two songs was "Thinking Of You". It was Kay Kyser's theme song, but it was originally titled "I've Grown So Lonely Thinking Of You". It was featured in several of Kay Kyser's movies, but the best known was probably "Du Barry Was a Lady". Here is a recording.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_reWe5ZmNi0

 

The other song was featured in "Three Little Words". Here is a clip:

 

 

Strangely, Red Skelton was in both movies. And here is Eddie in a clip from his TV show "Coke Time". Do you remember their slogan "At Home, At Work, Or On The Way"?

 

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That's good, Miles. The Kay Kyser movie I was thinking of was "That's Right--You're Wrong". I may be wrong, but I don't think Kay Kyser appeared in "Du Barry Was A Lady" although his theme song was used in the movie.

 

The Eddie Fisher hit was composed by Harry Ruby with lyrics by Bert Kalmar. Naturally, it was featured in their biopicture, "Three Little Words". Personally, I like that song better than the Kyser theme song.

 

Your thread

 

 

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Thanks. An obscure prison movie in the fifties would be all but forgotten now except for it's theme music. The song version was nominated for an Oscar, but it did not win. However, the song has been recorded by literally hundreds of artists over the years. Can you name the movie, the song, and, for extra cedit, the name of the actor who sang it in the movie?

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I haven't seen it in years, but could this be it? -

 

Movie: UNCHAINED (1955).

Song: "Unchained Melody".

Actor who sang the song: Todd Duncan.

 

I believe the famous song was originally to be called "Lonely River" then "Unchained" and finally "Unchained Melody" (literally being "the melody from Unchained").

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You got it, MN. The song was nominated for an Oscar, but lost to "Love Is A Many Splendored Thing". Here is how "Unchained Melody" first sounded.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JckrStimeDQ

 

The star of the movie was football player Elroy "Crazylegs" Hirsch. Also in the clip was Jerry Paris, who played Jerry the neighbor on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" before becoming a successful TV director. Your turn, musicalnovelty.

 

 

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> {quote:title=MilesArcher wrote:}{quote}

> You got it, MN. The song was nominated for an Oscar, but lost to "Love Is A Many Splendored Thing". Here is how "Unchained Melody" first sounded.

>

> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JckrStimeDQ

>

 

I've sometimes wondered how many of the song's millions of fans over the years must have been curious when listening to the lyrics what does the title have to do with anything? - not knowing the song title's origin from a movie entitled UNCHAINED.

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New question:

 

What 1950's band used for their theme song an arrangement of the old Civil War tune "Jubilo"?

 

Clue:

One of the co-bandleaders (the one who did the arrangement of "Jubilo") was my uncle! - okay maybe that won't be much help...but I've always been proud to be related!

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Yes, correct!

I wasn't sure how long it might take for someone to get this one. Are you familiar with The Sauter-Finegan Orchestra? Or did you just do some research to get the answer?

 

The theme indeed was "The Doodletown Fifers", arranged by my uncle Bill Finegan. They liked the funny name Doodletown, and later wrote other songs using the name, such as "Doodletown Races" and "Yankee Doodletown".

 

I always called Bill Finegan "Uncle Bill" but actually the relation is that his father and my Dad's father were brothers. So, not being an expert at the details, he may technically not be my uncle, but he was cool with me calling him Uncle Bill.

He was a brilliant (and funny) guy.

He passed away on June 4, 2008, and a few days later at his funeral I got to meet some of the surviving members of the Sauter-Finegan Orch. Oh, the stories they told of the old days - the touring, etc.!

Ed Sauter's son was there too - very nice guy. It was great to see how very much interested he is in his Dad's music and the recordings and history of the band. He gave me some amazing recordings of some of the commercial music the orchestra recorded in the late 1950's and early 1960's (some of it apparently never released).

Bill's son and daughter are also great people and interested in their Dad's music.

 

In that YouTube clip of the band performing "Midnight Sleighride" that's Bill beating on his chest for percussion. I love the way Bill and Ed (Ed is the one with the glasses) would introduce the numbers. The come across like a couple of professors. Each were accomplished musicians but didn't always perform in every number, preferring to do the writing and arranging.

That clip is from a May 1954 episode of The Colgate Comedy Hour (somewhere around here I have the original TV Guide with the exact date & details). The puddle of water visible on the floor is leftover from an earlier Abbott & Costello routine.

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