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TCM, Thanks for the Baby Peggy documentary and films!!!!


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Unkind? Not at all. You are ENTITLED TO YOUR OPINION ON THIS BOARD (shouting not meant for you, but the others who might think they have the right to silence you).

 

I agree. I don't think you have me on ignore, and said the exact same thing.

 

I also couldn't stand Shirley Temple (oh the heresy!), Jackie Coogan, Bobs Watson, Jane Withers, the second kid in Lassie, Margaret O'Brien (oh BOY was she annoying) or just about everyone else as a kid, with the exception of Natalie Wood, she was adorable and a good actress.

 

 

Alternatively, there are some excellent child actors in the movies (television seems to still attract hacks) today, and their names are not nearly as well known as the hacks above.

 

Still and all, kudos to Jackie Coogan and Paul Peterson for cutting off the crooked relatives at the knees.

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I don't know Peggy Ann Garner - if she was an untalented as O'Brien (Withers was a little better ) and Temple, then I'm glad her name escapes me.

 

W.C. Fields was right, although he disliked dogs too, and dogs were MUCH better in the classics than kids. :)

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Thanks TCM for the doc and the film tribute to Baby Peggy.

 

I'm surprised that posters don't know Peggy Ann Garner! She was Jane Eyre as a child in the Joan Fontaine, Orson Welles version and Francie in *A Tree Grows In Brooklyn*. She was excellent in both films.. Those were major roles in those 2 Classic films.

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I almost skipped this night, but I'm glad now I didnt. I couldnt believe the lady is in her 90s. In the docu she looked barely 70 if that. I think the docu. said her STEPfather took the money. They didnt really explain that well (I dont think he was ever mentioned before that). I thought she was a cute little kid! (so there, Wonderly!). Sad she had no childhood to enjoy and was hard at work at 2 yrs old already. I watched all the films and enjoyed them.

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I think that it was her StepGrandfather that stole her money the first time.They don't know who took the $650K that disappeared from her account after that. I posted the info awhile back that Baby Peggy appeared on the Florence Henderson show on RLTV.Tthe segment is at least 15 minutes. She discusses her career and the photos are terrific. It's rerun every so often. Highly recommend watching it.

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The stepgrandfather I think was suppose to be some sort of investment manager. He was handling her money. What was also shocking was that Peggy said that all the valuable possesions had also disappeared. Not so shocking is the stepgrandfather was a louse and thief, but her grandmother went along with it. She disappeared with him and all Baby Peggy's fortune.

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willbefree25 wrote:

<< I also couldn't stand Shirley Temple (oh the heresy!), >>

 

If you are referring to her unrealistic mannerism, you are correct but remember during this time period she came along at the perfect time. People during the Great Depression had nothing but sadness and despair. Shirley brought a bit of happinest even if for a short time to people escaping from the misery.

 

She did had some realistic roles, before her "discovery", she played the somewhat normal kid sister in the "Frolics of Youth" shorts. Later on, portrayed a tomboy in "Just Around the Corner" (1938) and a spoiled brat in "The Bluebird" (1940). (the public didn't like that one a bit)

 

She admitted during interviews and her biography that the studio supressed her pent up wild side. Sometimes it poked through like her shooting Eleanor Roosevelt in the rear end with a sling shot by which she got a spanking by her mother which broke the ruler.

 

If there's any comfort (for you), its highly unlikely this phenomenon will ever repeat itself.

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I mentioned in a previous post that the Step Grandfather (Peggy's fathers Step Father), who was a Banker from Chicago, managed her first Million at the request of her father because her father felt he could not handle that much money. It was the Grandmother & Step Grandfather who squandered the first batch of money, the Million Plus.

 

The 650K was squandered by her mother & father.

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> If there's any comfort (for you), its highly unlikely this phenomenon will ever repeat itself.

 

I agree. I don't see anybody shooting Eleanor Roosevelt in the tuckus with a slingshot again.

 

(Or George Brent, for that matter.)

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> {quote:title=lavenderblue19 wrote:}{quote}Thanks TCM for the doc and the film tribute to Baby Peggy.

>

> I'm surprised that posters don't know Peggy Ann Garner! She was Jane Eyre as a child in the Joan Fontaine, Orson Welles version and Francie in *A Tree Grows In Brooklyn*. She was excellent in both films.. Those were major roles in those 2 Classic films.

Peggy Ann Garner was wonderful in both of the films you referenced. I particularly enjoyed her work as the young. obstinate Jane Eyre ( and the young Eyre had every reason to be obstinate considering how she was treated ).

 

As to Baby Peggy, excellent documentary of a very engaging woman; what an inspiration. She has handled what life handed her with such grace. She was a pure delight.

 

 

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  • 5 years later...
8 minutes ago, CoriSCapnSkip said:

What language was that in the titles of Peg o' the Mounted?

Canadian? :P:lol:

I recorded it Sunday and "Such As Life" last year.  Also have "Elephant in The Room".  I purchsed "Captain January" and "Family Secret" from Grapevine video over a decade ago on VHS.  The music score is much better than what TCM presented.

There is a film called "April Fool" (1926) but she only has a small part in it.

 

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