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LINDA DARNELL for Star of the Month October 2013


Arturo
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In the Summer of 1950, Linda Darnell was given her next film assignment. It would be a remake of the classic French film LE CORBEAU, retitled THE THIRTEENTH LETTER, to be filmed on location in the Canadian province of Quebec. Linda was upset that the director was her nemesis, Otto Preminger, having recently re-signed with Fox. Trying to make the best of the situation, she liked the role she got, as it offered an acting challenge, playing a crippled girl, Denise.

 

 

 

 

 

Although she was top-billed, Linda's role is not a dominating one. This story of a rash of poison pen letters sowing discord in a small town had several storylines. Befitting this, a fairly large cast had sizable parts, with none being much larger than the rest. New studio contract star Michael Rennie is cast as the new doctor in town; Charles Boyer the older doctor; another new contractee, Constance Smith, ended up here after a game of casting musical chairs. Orignally her role of Cora, the young wife of Boyer's, had been assigned to Maureen O'Hara. Cora was to be in the remake of BERKELEY SQUARE, opposite Tyrone Power, when Jeanne Crain became pregnant. Then Smith was switched to 13TH LETTER, and Ann Blyth borrowed for the Power movie, renamed I'LL NEVER FORGET YOU.

 

 

 

 

 

The movie turned out to be fairly engrossing, if not up to the original. The locations add to the flavor of the movie,a fair amount of suspense is engendered, and the cast is uniformly strong. It did well when released in early 1951. Linda would never be in another of Preminger's movies, although the four they did were strong films IMHO.

 

 

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Immediately after finishing THE THIRTEENTH LETTER in the fall of 1950, Linda Darnell was assigned to costar again with Paul Douglas, in THE GUY WHO CAME BACK (then known by the title of THE MAN WHO SANK THE NAVY). Linda flat out refused to do it, and Fox suspended her. Besides stating she needed a vacation, she didn't care for the role. She didn't want to again play the other woman, tempting Douglas away from his wife (slated to be played by Joan Bennett). 20th felt that the popular team could have another success with this comedy-drama, in which Douglas is an ex-football player, hoping to give it one more try in the big-leagues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The studio tested other actresses for the role of the model, including a young Marilyn Monroe, then hoping to get another contract with Fox (she would shortly). In the end, Linda relented and agreed to participate in the movie. The main reason she did so was that she needed money, since she had agreed to pay husband Peverell Marley, whom she was divorcing, $125,000 so he wouldn't contest the divorce, or more importantly, expose Linda's affair with Joe Mankiewicz. THE GUY WHO CAME BACK started filming late in 1950.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Upon acepting the assignment, Linda refused to have her hair dyed platinum blonde (explaining MM being tested), and was able to prevail on this point. It was her first role in awhile where she was glamorous again. Her last three movies, NO WAY OUT, TWO FLAGS WEST and THE 13TH LETTER, had Linda in decidely non-glamorous parts, which she relished. But playing a fashion model, she had to have the requisite accoutrements. Of course she looked beautiful. Upon release in mid-1951, the movie had a mild reception, from critics and audiences, as the erosion of movie audiences TV continued, leaving many movies without the grosses they might've commanded a couple of years earlier.

 

Edited by: Arturo on Jan 27, 2013 3:29 PM

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For Linda Darnell, 1951 would be a year that would have long-term repercussions for her, both in her personal life and in her career. After nearly 8 years, of marriage, Linda finally obtained her divorce from her husband Pev Marley early in the year (her arrival at the hearing for her testimony had the press spotlight on how chic she looked). She kept the custom designed home she was building in Brentwood, while he kept another more modest house. However, she had struggled to come up with the $125,000 hush money she had paid him; she used most of her savings, as well as sell some items. He left her the legacy of heavy drinking-straight, which he had taught her soon after being married. She also kept Lola, the two year old daughter they adopted soon after her birth (reputedly Pev was her biological father).

 

 

 

Since the divorce had cleared her out financially (and around this time she was a victim of a former manager who embezzled several thousand dollars, plus a hotel suite she had in NYC was broken into and she lost thousands in furs and jewelry), she went to Zanuck to try to get better terms under her contract, plus allowing her to freelance. He agreed, and revised the contract in March 1951, but as he now had Susan Hayward handling the types of roles that Linda got, he had her film committments to Fox be limited to one per year, with Linda free to take as many outside roles as she wished. Linda felt that this would work in her interests, both financially and careerwise. And almost immediately, she got an outside film offer, THE LADY PAYS OFF, to be filmed at Universal Studios. Her salary would be $7,500 a week, with a ten week guarantee. Linda was happy, feeling that this new venture would give many motion picture opportunities.

 

 

 

 

More to come.....

 

Edited by: Arturo on Jan 28, 2013 10:40 PM

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Linda Darnell did her first freelance role, under her revised contract at 20th Century Fox, in the Spring of 1951. This was a comedy by director Douglas Sirk, THE LADY PAYS OFF. It also starred Stephen McNally, Gigi Perreau, and Virginia Field. Linda plays a schoolteacher ("Teacher of the Year"), who inadvertently racks up $7,000.00 in gambling debts at McNally's casino in Reno, Nevada. In order to pay this amount, he has Linda tutor his 9 year old daughter. Linda does so reluctantly, and takes out her anger on the girl. Of course, as in all romantic comedies, the love-hate relationship with Linda and Stephen runs its predictable course.

 

 

 

 

 

Linda enjoyed making this movie, parts of which were filmed on location in the Carmel area of the Central California coast. She ahd been requested for this role by Douglas Sirk, who had steered her in her breakthrough performance in 1944's SUMMER STORM. Some publicity ensued from some of Linda's promotional shots, which claimed that it was the first time since the mid-40s that she had posed in a bathing suit, a claim that is patently false. The movie also called attention of the Production Code, which claimed that Linda's cleavage was way too exposed. There is no evidence of this in the movie, so the offending sections might have been cut out or refilmed. Linda does wear an unusual wardrobe (don't know who the designer was, but was probably under contract to Universal), but looks beautiful and glamorous nonetheless.

 

 

 

 

 

The movie got decent reviews, and Linda's were very good, and it did reasonably well when released late in 1951. Linda realized she enjoyed the freelancing she now was free to do, feeling that she would have a betteropportunity to call the shots over which movies to do.

 

Edited by: Arturo since I had to leave work and didn't finish.

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Linda Darnell had enjoyed making THE LADY PAYS OFF at Universal, her first experience freelancing under her revised contract for Fox. Her studio had planned to cast her with Tyrone Power in a technicolor adventure, LYDIA BAILEY, which would have reunited them for the first time in 10 years, but Power balked at being cast in another costume epic. This led to Fox shelving the film for a short while. When it went back into production, Linda was filming elsewhere, in her second freelancing movie, and was no longer available. It would have been a good role for Linda, playing an American landowner in revolution-wracked late 18th century Haiti. Instead, new contractee Anne Francis was assigned the part meant for Linda, along with new leading man Dale Robertson.

 

Earlier, a reteaming with Dana Andrews was contemplated in SECRET OF CONVICT LAKE. But when it went before the cameras, the stars were Gene Tierney and Glenn Ford. Linda probably fought against another western, since she was allergic to horses. And as noted before, 20th was now giving its most prestigious roles to Susan Hayward, which could have each been strong movie parts for Linda. Another role that Linda would have excelled in IMHO, was WAIT TIL THE SUN SHINES NELLIE, Henry King's evocative turn of the century melodrama. But she woudl miss out in doing both this movie, and the back-on-track LYDIA BAILEY; both would begin filming when Linda was in Jamaica for a protracted amount of time doing a film for director Stuart Heisler, SATURDAY ISLAND (which would be released in the US as ISLAND OF DESIRE), her second freelancing role.

 

More to come.......

 

 

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Linda Darnell made her second free-lance movie, back to back with her first. This was going by the name GOD'S LITTLE ISLAND, but would be released in Enland as SATURDAY ISLAND, which was the name of the book on which it was based, and would be released in the US as ISLAND OF DESIRE. It was a British production that would be distributed by UA in the States, and RKO elsewhere. The director was Stuart Heisler, who had also written the script. In the summer of 1951, Linda flew off to Jamaica to begin shooting on location. She was to play a Canadian nurse during WW2, who gets stranded with a young American marine on a deserted in the South Pacific.

 

 

 

 

 

Before leaving for the location shoot, Linda had been instrumental in selecting her co-star. At a casting call, she had to administer a kiss with the prospective player, to gauge their chemistry I guess. She whispered into his ear something along the lines of, "Don't be nervous honey, I'm good for newcomers", and the actor who would be henceforth known as Tab Hunter would be strarting his movie career.

 

 

 

 

 

More to come.......

 

 

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Linda Darnell spent the Summer of 1951 on location, filming ISLAND OF DESIRE. This movie dealt with Linda being shipwrecked on an island during WW2 with a cocky and immature marine, played by newcomer Tab Hunter. The simple plot had Linda, a prim nurse whose devotion to her career has left her to eschew her personal life, and is thus considered a spinster, an "old maid", even though in real life Linda was all of 27 when she filmed this movie (reminds me of the line that David Wayne says to Marilyn Monroe, while seated next to each other on an airplane in HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE, re: her wearing reading glasses, "I've never seen anyone that reminds me less of an old maid" or something to that effect). Anyway, her initial revulsion over his brashness softens to admiration for his know-how, and eventually, and inevitably, into love. Hunter, for his part, is early on frustrated because she is so (intentionally) off-putting towards him, is very happy when she finally relents. Well into their sealed little paradise comes literally crashing a British fighter pilot, and nurse Darnell is forced to amputate an arm (played by Donald Gray, real life pilot turned actor who lost an arm during WWII). Well as she nurses him back to health, they develop mutual feelings for each other, as Tab jealously watches. Eventually, they all get rescued, and the pairings are sorted in the most logically fashion imho.

 

During the filming, a hurricane roared through Jamaica, cutting off all communication with the outside world. (Luckily, prior to this, Linda had sent her 2 1/2 year old daughter Lola back to the States, as the heat, humidity and mosquitos was making it a trying experience for mother and daughter). Headlines reported that the status of Linda and the film crew was unknown, as they were incommunicado. When communications were restored, the press flocked to Linda to comment on the experience. When asked how she weathered the storm, she answered, "With a prayer and a bottle of scotch!", inadvertently referencing her fondness for drinking.

 

More to come.....

 

Edited by: Arturo on Feb 1, 2013 2:58 PM

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The cast and crew of SATURDAY ISLAND/ISLAND OF DESIRE flew back to England from Jamaica to complete the opening and closing scenes of the movie in studio soundstages. Once the filming was finished, Linda came down with jaundice contracted while on location. She was hospitalized in London for over 5 weeks. During this period, an Italian producer, Giuseppe Amato, visited Linda and proposed that they make a film in the near future. Linda mulled over the idea, and decided that she would consider it, but was not up to anything at that time. In December 1951, she returned to the States, taking a suite in New York to be near her love Joseph Mankiewicz, who was staying there preparing for JULIUS CAESAR. She then flew to Hollywood to be with her daughter for the holidays. While there, she had a relapse of the jaundice, and in her weakened condition, told Darryl Zanuck that she was unable to work, and would need a long rest; she told her agent as well. When she returned to NYC early in 1952, she found that her suite had been ransacked completely, with many valuable items of Linda's taken.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SATURDAY ISLAND opened in Britain in March 1952; it wouldn't be released in the US (as ISLAND OF DESIRE) until the summer. Everywhere it got mixed reviews, with raves for the Technicolor and scenery, not so much for the trite story. Linda got good reviews, as did Donald Gray' but newcomer Tab Hunter was rightly considered wooden. However, the movie was a big hit everywhere, with Linda wearing some revealing costumes made out of hemp, and Tab in little more than a loincloth; the ad campaign focused on this as the main selling point, obviously successfully so.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Linda Darnell didn't have much to do, other than look beautiful and sultry. She could look amazingly youthful (including one scene where she wears pigtails and recalls the same look she wore in CHAD HANNA, filmed when she was still 16). More importantly for the success of the movie, her outfits allowed her to spend the better part of the movie showing her voluptuous figure, which the filmmakers exploited to great effect. She got qutie a bit of publicity from this in all the fan magazines, etc. She had not played a part this overtly sexy since FOREVER AMBER, filmed nearly 5 years earlier.

 

Edited by: Arturo on Feb 2, 2013 12:03 PM

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In early spring 1952, Linda Darnell felt well enough to be able to work. 20th Century Fox assigned her to a psychological murder mystery, NIGHT WITHOUT SLEEP, also starring Gary Merrill and Hildegard Neff. In it she plays a movie star, stopping over in New York on her way to make a film in England. She meets Gary, a onetime successful Broadway writer-director now on the skids, at a party, letting him know they had met some six years earlier. He has no recollection of her, but is entranced by her beauty. They each cancel their engagements for that night, and do the town together.

 

All this is told in flashback, as Gary wakes up the following morning trying to piece together the night before, and especially the feeling he had murdered one of three women: his wife, his mistress Hildegarde, or Linda. He eventually realizes who it is, and turns himself in. Linda, who has been in love with him since she tried out for one of his plays, comes around the next morning hoping he'd see her off, sees him off instead.

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NIGHT WITHOUT SLEEP was released in the Fall of 1952, and turned out to be a so-so psychological mystery. For me, the problem is Gary Merrill's character, who I find boring, boorish, full of himself, and wallowing in self-pity. Why would the attractive women in his life have ever been attracted to him. This makes the movie hard to take. Especially for Linda Darnell's character, as a beautiful movie star, what would she see in a drunk that definitely needs a shave and a bath. OK, so she has had a thing for him since he had ensured her casting as a dancer in his successful play, "Purple Like Grapes", which incidentally, was the original title of this movie (and "Night Without Sleep" was a working title for Marilyn Monroe's first starring film at Fox, released as DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK). Obviously, Bette Davis "got" Gary's attraction, but I don't see him as a leading man, and definitely not one that would have been able to tempt a movie siren like Linda. The movie would work so much better, and be so much more believable, if someone like Tyrone Power or Dana Andrews had done it (2-3 years earlier, when 20th first acquired this property, their names were bandied about as possible leads in this movie).

 

This is a good example of the rather haphazard way that Linda Darnell was treated at Fox, where she would be tossed into many fairly routine movies with little concern over the long-term viability of her career (and their coffers). Of course by 1952, Susan Hayward was just then being crowned the studio's top dramatic actress (Darryl Zanuck would refer to her as his "$12 Million Dollar Baby", referring to the combined budgets of all the top films they had awaiting release with her). Linda could have acquitted herself well in any of these: WITH A SONG IN MY HEART, THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO, THE PRESIDENT'S LADY, and WHITE WITCH DOCTOR. But she was never high in Zanuck's good graces. Also, Marilyn Monroe was exploding as the new sex symbol of the decade, and suddenly, Linda found her position at the studio ever more precarious and extraneous.

 

Another good role that Linda was being considered for, but did not get, was the gritty crime drama (and future noir classic), PICK-UP ON SOUTH STREET. And she would have done well as MM's partner in GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES; she had an decent voice, and she could dance as well as Jane Russell (for whom the studio would not have had to borrow), and IMHO, was more beautiful than Jane. Or the next Monroe film, HOW TO MARRY A MILLIONAIRE, she would have been perfect in the part played by Lauren Bacall (again, borrowed by Fox), where her acid delivery of witty dialogue, as already demonstrated, would have been great. Instead the studio dropped her in the fall of 1952, after 13 1/2 years there. She was a rather high-priced commodity in a Hollywood whose profits were crashing, and other stars on the lot (Hayward, Monroe) were suddenly more popular.

At the time, Linda was actually relieved (after all, it was only one movie a year she had to do for the studio), especially because now she could take the offer by Giuseppe Amato to make movies in Italy. Plus, she was enjoying freelancing, so she felt this as a positive move. She would say rather wistfully that, "I feel Iike a girl leaving home for the first time", since she had been at the studio since arriving in Hollywood at age 15 in 1939. She would be bracing for the brave new world that was Hollywood movies in the topsy-turvy mid-1950s.

 

Edited by: Arturo on Feb 6, 2013 8:24 PM

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Heads up: Tomorrow on TCM's salute to movies with Oscar nominations from 20th Century Fox will feature a Linda Darnell Double feature:

 

11:30 a.m. est, 8:30 am pst: THE MARK OF ZORRO (1940)

1:30 p.m. est, 10:30 am pst: BLOOD AND SAND (1941)

 

 

Or a Tyrone Power triple feature if you count the movie right before these:

 

9:30 a.m. est, 6:30 am pst: THE RAINS CAME (1939)

 

 

Both Darnell and Power have other films later that day (or the next):

 

Darnell with ANNA AND THE KING OF SIAM (1946) and NO WAY OUT (1950).

 

Power with CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE (1947).

 

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Linda Darnell started a new film in June 1952 for RKO (with the provisional title of BUCCANEER EMPIRE), fresh from completing her last film under her contract for 20th Century Fox, (although at that time, she didn't know it would be her last film there, as the contract would be terminated in the Fall of 1952). The new film, directed by one-eyed director Raoul Walsh, would be released as BLACKBEARD THE PIRATE. Starring with Linda were an exceedingly hammy Robert Newton as the title character, William Bendix as Newton's right-hand man, and new leading man Keith Andes (in a part originally meant for Robert Mitchum). Featured in this pirate epic were Irene Ryan as Linda's lady-in waiting (Newton: "Waiting for what?"...Bendix: "For a man, most likely!'), and future leading man Richard Egan in a small role. Plus the usual assortment of oddballs and cutthoats to be found in the late 17th century Spanish Main.

 

Here, Linda plays a captured lady thinking she's going to marry Captain Morgan, on whose ship she is boarding, unaware that Blackbeard has hanged him and commandeered the vessel for himself. She has stolen a huge stockpile of treasure, which is quickly appropriated by Blackbeard, with the help of a drunken loose tongued Irene Ryan. She tries to recover it with the help of Keith Andes, playing a doctor attending to Blackbeard's wounds, and here her love interest. Several battles ensue, both on land and on sea. The crafty Blackbeard is finally buried in the sand at water's edge, with the tide rising, when his men realized that he intends to hold out on dividing the captured booty from them.

 

This enjoyable romp featured Linda again looking quite fetching in Technicolor and period costumes (she was still thin from her recent bouts of illness). As befits a movie made at Howard Hughes' studio, Linda is required to show an amazing amount of cleavage in the low-cut gowns she wears (by now Monroe had joined Jane Russell in making the decade one of mammary-crazed excess). She is once again a damsel in distress, albeit one with fire and spunk. Robert Newton is suitably over-the-top with the tongue in cheek dialogue, seemingly enjoying saying it as much as we're enjoying listening to it. And the rest of the cast contribute to the fun of the proceedings.

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HEAD'S UP:

 

 

For those with Fox Movie Channel, they will be showing the Linda Darnell noir FALLEN ANGEL this Saturday morning at 8 am Eastern, 5 am Pacific. FMC will also show other noirs that morning, from MOONTIDE prior to FA, to LAURA and VICKY afterwards.

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Linda DArnell finished working on BLACKBEARD THE PIRATE in August 1952, and soon flew to Rome Italy, to meet with director Giuseppe Amato, to finalize their filmmaking plans. She took her 4 year old daughter Lola with her. He had first approached her the prevoius Autumn, while she was recuperating in London from her jaundice episodes. Later, in the Spring of 1952, he had flown to Hollywood to discuss upcoming projects. Now, as Linda arrived in Rome, he greeted her at the airport, and immediately took her out on the town. Then they spent a week in Capri. The Italian press was abuzz that the divorced Linda and the married Amato were having an affair, something they both denied. Anyway, Linda spent a couple of months or so in Italy at this time, and chose a script to film, one of three Amato offered her; another was planned for filming later. LInda fell in love with Italy, to the point of stating that she would love to live there in the future.However, the movie was not set to begin; in fact, it looked possible that it wouldn't start until early 1953. So Linda flew back to the States. She was greeted at the airport in New York by reporters, wanting to know if the reports of her affair with Amato were true. She again denied the reports, and stated that she was single, but looking for a man to fall in love with; her on-again, off-again affair with Joe Mankiewicz was never brought up. She was relieved that Fox had cancelled her contract at this time, as it wouldn't interfere with any plans to film abroad. She had also put out word to her agent to not accept any offers of movies for the next few months, so as to be free to return to Italy as needed.Linda, without a contract or any filmwork (even if by choice), and no steady man, began to sink into a depression. She began to drink heavily, and started to gain weight. Her weight problems she had had at least since the mid-40s, with her love of starchy foods as well as drink, and as with many other stars back then, gained much weight between film assignments. But she was always able to lose weight quickly as needed, when a movie role was offered. Early in 1953, RKO offered her a movie role, the female lead in SECOND CHANCE, and as the movie being planned in Italy, DONNE PROIBITE, was pushed back to start later in 1953, Linda accepted, and immediately went on a diet, as it would soon start shooting in Mexico. SECOND CHANCE had been offered to Susan Hayward, but she didn't care for her costumes. Howard Hughes, who had just had Linda expose her cleavage in BLACKBEARD, wanted her to do the same, but to greater effect, as this would be that studio's first 3-D film. Linda would thwart these plans, as she still felt overweight when the filming began, and ended up spending most of the movie wearing a black suit.More to come......

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Someone posted this on the IMDb...

 

Have you seen the cover for the new LAURA BluRay disc? Doesn't this look more like Linda Darnell than Gene Tierney?

 

 

 

 

 

EDITED TO ADD: It was later shown on the IMDb that it's just the retouching of a black-and-white photo of Tierney's image that caused this confusion. But I'll leave the image up anyway.

 

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, thanks for your ever-interesting thread. I enticed a Darnell fan to read it and he sends his thanks also.

 

 

Laura_BD_Spine.jpeg

 

Edited by: clore on Feb 10, 2013 5:46 PM

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SECOND CHANCE was Linda Darnell's second movie for RKO, and would star her with that studio's top male star, Robert Mitchum, along with bad guy Jack Palance. It would be filmed mostly in Taxco, Guerrero, but also in Cuernavaca, Morelos, both an hour or two south of Mexico City. RKO was then run by Howard Hughes, with whom Linda had been involved back around 1946-47. She was offered the role when Susan Hayward refused it; apparently resident sexpot Jane Russell was unavailable, due a loan out to 20th Century Fox for GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES (a part I've mentioned here would have been perfect for Linda imo), although I think by then Mitchum had had enough of the studio trying to make Mitchum-Russell into another Bogart-Bacall (he would refuse to do THE FRENCH LINE with her later in 1953).

 

The movie was a typical potboiler, with Linda a gangster's moll traveling incognito south of the border so she doesn't have to return to testify, Mitchum a boxer who can't get over having killed another in the ring, and therefore, barnstorming second raters in Latin America. Palance is in the employ of the gangster, there to silence Darnell, but secretly in love with her. Plenty of suspense is provided by Palance chasing Darnell through the winding cobblestone streets of Taxco, and later, by a cable car full of passengers, including the three leads, dangling mid-route as its cables break.

 

The picturesque settings are helped by the Technicolor used, and it was RKO's first 3-D effort. To this effect, Hughes had wanted Linda to expose as much of her breasts as the times would allow, and wear some literally eye-popping outfits. Linda however, still felt overweight, despite having quickly lost much weight to prepare for the filming, and refused to wear anything too revealing. She spends most of the movie in a tailored black suit, but still looks beautiful nonetheless. Her acting is very good overall, especially in the chase scenes, as is the rest of the cast; the only issue I have with her is her delivery of some insipid dialogue as she and Mitchum are falling in love. Despite the thwarting of some of the intended exploitive aspects, the movie got good reviews and was a hit when released in the Summer of 1953.

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I was looking forward to Second Chance when it was shown on Linda Darnell's SUTS day in August of 2011, given both the All-Star cast and the promising synopsis, but that had to be one of *THE WORST PRINTS* I've ever seen TCM get a hold of. The soundtrack was so garbled it sounded as if it had been dubbed. Hopefully one day they'll be able to restore it to its original quality or find a better copy.

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> {quote:title=infinite1 wrote:}{quote}Sorry, any other month but October. October is reserved for stars of the macabre, unless that is your reason for choosing her for October. Personally, I'd like to see BELA LUGOSI as SOTM for October 2013.

I'd love to see Lugosi as a SOTM, but looking back on October's previous choices, the only ones who fall under the description of "macabre" would be Boris Karloff (2003) and Peter Lorre (2004). Other than that we've had tons of whitebreads in October, ranging from Henry Fonda to Gregory Peck to Jane Powell to Leslie Caron to that cheerful category known as "Child Stars".

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