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Foreign Films Recently on TCM


kingrat
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A big shout-out to the programmers for some of the outstanding foreign films shown in the last month or so:

 

 

CARNIVAL IN FLANDERS (LA KERMESSE HEROIQUE)

 

 

PICKPOCKET

 

 

SIMON OF THE DESERT

 

 

L'ATALANTE

 

 

For me, all of these films lived up to their reputations. I had only seen L'ATALANTE in a poor print, and the gorgeous restoration shown, probably from the Criterion Collection, was a revelation. The other three were all new to me. Did some of the rest of you see these films?

 

 

 

 

 

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Kingrat, I love foreign films and wish I'd seen the ones you list. I'm afraid I'm not very good at looking up TCM's programming well in advance for planning purposes, and so missed them.

The only one of the four you list that I've seen is *Simon of the Desert*. I'll watch anything by Luis Bunuel.

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I love that TCM is demonstrating excellent acuity in their selection of foreign movies. I hope it will break down the barrier some people have erected against any movie not made in America or England.

 

It is sad to say that I recognize the superiority of those films which you listed but none of them are to my personal taste.

 

I hope they air many more Japanese and French movies. I will tolerate more Italian, Spanish or Swedish movies.

 

I really, really, really, really, really wish they could negotiate with Mosfilm for rights to air their extensive library. I believe most of them would resonate more with Americans than many West-European movies do.

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> {quote:title=dpompper wrote:}{quote}VERY nice to see foreign film offerings beyond just "Jules & Jim."

...which, by the way, I think is boringly over-rated. I always think *Jules and Jim* is one of those "foreign films" that people always list when they don't really know many foreign films, but can always remember this one.

Jeanne Moreau's character is so annoying, she's supposed to be one of those unfathomable (to the male mind) "free" uber-women who are charmingly unpredictable and cannot ever be "pinned down", not even to what she wants for dinner let alone to which man she prefers. Her type is always doing wild and crazy things like running along the beach and throwing her lover's hat into the water, hahahaha, or suddenly getting up from a picnic and flying up the flower-bedecked hill, tossing her head and laughingly asking her lover(s), "Do you think I'm impetuous?" She always pretends her favourite conversation topic is "life", but really, her favourite conversation topic is her.

 

This female archtype is all over the place in movies, always has been. I don't know if anyone saw *500 Days of Summer* (2009, I think) but the Zoey Deschanel character is an updated Jeanne Moreau/"Catherine" from *Jules and Jim*.

This kind of character is, for both men and women,always a pain in the buttocks.

 

 

By the way, I like Francois Truffaut's work. Usually. And I like Jeanne Moreau. Generally.

 

Edited by: misswonderly on Dec 6, 2012 7:32 PM

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I agree 100%, missw (as per usual).

 

 

It bothers me that some people think J&J is the ONLY "classic" foreign film. I like looking at Oskar Werner and applaud the sauciness of a three-some back then . . . but otherwise find it really boring. And that scene where the girl smokes and prances like a choo-choo . . . I just don't get what's the big deal (maybe it's a guy thing, I dunno).

 

 

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> {quote:title=SansFin wrote:}{quote}. I hope it will break down the barrier some people have erected against any movie not made in America or England.

>

 

 

Unlikely to happen. Sadly, the vast majority of Americans HATE subtitles. When I use to work in theaters, it was a common thing for people to come out and demand a refund as soon as they saw the first subtitles. because they "didn't come to read a movie". Give them a horribly dubbed Jackie Chan film and they'd eat it up it, but a great foreign film, that's subtitled, and they head for the exits.

 

Probably the same with a lot of TCM viewers. Next, time there's a foreign film on listen closely and as the first subtitles come on the screen you'll be able to hear the sounds of thousands of remotes changing channels. :D

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I liked CARNIVAL IN FLANDERS very much. I recorded L'ATLANTE, but have not had time to view it yet. I hope that TCM gets a chance to show A LA SOMBRA DEL PUENTE (1948) again, I enjoyed it when it ran 12 or so years ago. I hope also hope that they can run some of Ingrid Bergman's Swedish films again (sorry Sans Fin), I liked what I saw, but I did miss a couple of them when TCM ran them many years ago.

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Most people I know (myself included) prefer foreign films with subtitles. However, there are two exceptions:

 

*Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow* -- I saw this when it came out. It was dubbed, and I really like the rhythms of the dubbed English dialogue. "She's got the belly, she's got the belly, ...." I miss that in the subtitled version.

 

*The Black Pit of Dr. M.*, the great Mexican horror film, has a particularly wonderful dubbing job. ("Yes, it's me. I came back in Elmer's body!") It used to be on local television in NYC. The dubbed print is said to be lost, please someone find it!

 

But apart from those two, of course I want subtitles.

 

 

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> {quote:title=Scottman wrote:}{quote}

> I hope also hope that they can run some of Ingrid Bergman's Swedish films again (sorry Sans Fin)

 

Not to worry. I often find little personal resonance with the majority of Swedish movies but any foreign language movies are quite welcome.

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Unlikely to happen. Sadly, the vast majority of Americans HATE subtitles. When I use to work in theaters, it was a common thing for people to come out and demand a refund as soon as they saw the first subtitles. because they "didn't come to read a movie". Give them a horribly dubbed Jackie Chan film and they'd eat it up it, but a great foreign film, that's subtitled, and they head for the exits.

 

Probably the same with a lot of TCM viewers. Next, time there's a foreign film on listen closely and as the first subtitles come on the screen you'll be able to hear the sounds of thousands of remotes changing channels. :D

 

For me it's the exact opposite. Any time I turn on a foreign movie and listen to the *always* badly synched dubbing, I turn it off. The worst example on TCM is a 1963 Brigitte Bardot and Jack Palance movie called Contempt, a title which aptly described the distributor's feelings towards the audience. I can't even imagine trying to sit through more than five minutes of that film.

 

The only problem I have with subtitles seems to come up more in silents than in foreign films, which is when you have up to a minute's worth of conversation with no accompanying text. The acting is often so superb in these early gems that the words are sometimes superfluous, but at some point it begins to leave too much to the imagination, and you wish you knew exactly what they were saying.

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I think TCM does a good job at what they do... No complaints from me...

Any foreign films TCM airs are fine with me...

I like watching foreign films because it's interesting to see how other cultures express themselves through their films. And we're all people, so foreign films can resonate with us in North America...

Foreign films are not made by aliens from another planet, after all...

They are simply movies, and just like Hollywood films, some people like some better than others...

If people want to suggest a foreign film to TCM, they can use the "Suggest a Movie" feature under "Fan Community" above...

There are probably thousands of foreign films to choose from... So go for it and suggest some to TCM...

 

I wouldn't mind seeing something like "Marketa Lazarova" as I haven't seen it for years...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marketa_Lazarov%C3%A1

 

But TCM would have to work on the film rights and all that jazz...

All you can do is suggest a film...

 

In Ontario, Canada, we're lucky as the French-language channel TFO airs many French and international films... TVO's "Saturday Night at the Movies" airs some foreign films too.

And on cable TV there are many foreign-language channels that air foreign films.

There's still a free preview on cable TV of a Hindi movie channel, for example.

This channel airs the Indian films with English-subtitles, so you can understand what's goin on if you don't understand that language...

Last night, TFO aired "Le Cuirassé « Potemkine »"("Battleship Potemkin"), for example.

And tonight they're airing Aleksandr Sokurov's film "The Sun" about Emperor Hirohito:

 

http://www1.tfo.org/cine/horaire-tfo/le-soleil

and here: http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/10005788-the_sun/

 

Airing again Saturday night on TFO...

 

Russian director Sokurov did a trilogy of films about Lenin "Taurus," Hitler "Moloch," and Hirohito "The Sun." I've read about those films in the past but never seen any of them before but TFO is airing them all, and more, of Sokurov's films...

 

Anyway, lots of stuff for TCM to air - older foreign films and newer stuff - so make suggestions.

If TCM don't know about it, how they gonna air it?

 

As for subtitles, I don't care if a film has subtitles...

If you don't understand the language the film was originally made in, how else are you going to understand what's happening without English subtitles?

 

Ideally, in a perfect world, you'd understand the foreign language the film was made in and so wouldn't need the subtitles... Think of a foreigner, for example, watching a Hollywood movie that has subtitles in their language so they can understand it, or dubbed into their foreign language.

We know that they're probably going to miss out on something by not being able to watch the film in English, as we do. But if they don't understand English, what can you do?

The same goes for foreign language films in North America. We probably miss something by not watching the film in it's original language...

It's not a perfect situation, but what you gonna do??

I guess there are some snooty people who don't like subtitles because they can understand the foreign language and don't care if others can't...

But it is sad that many others are just plain ignorant and couldn't be bothered just because there are subtitles on the screen and they have to listen to some strange sounding language...

Foreign silent films with English subtitles can leave a lot to be desired, but whatever... Just means you have to pay more attention to what's going on... And a good idea to do a search and read about a film on the Internet either before or after to fill in holes of what you missed.

Lots of film reviews and synopses on the Internet to choose from...

 

Anyway, I don't care about subtitles and bad dubbing doesn't even bother me... That's the way she goes...

 

To sum up all my rambling, I'm happy with what TCM offers in foreign films and ain't got no complaints...

 

 

P.S. It's also sorta funny, regarding foreign films, since as a Canadian, all Hollywood movies are foreign films.

If it weren't made in Canada, it's a foreign film, eh?

But at least we share the same language (in English Canada), so no subtitles neccesary...

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I got a kick out of Touchez Pas au Grisbi with Jean Gabin as the (relatively) suave

old time crook who has seen it all before and knows the score and can still

make it with the younger ladies. Of course he has a clueless partner who screws

things up, as they usually do, and in the end he loses his stash of gold. That whole

underworld way of life and culture is really brought to life in this pic. And there's also

Jeannne Moreau with her long long ponytail. Tres chic. This would make a good

double bill with Bob Le Flambeur.

 

 

I also managed to make it through Solaris, but I missed part of the plot because the

subtitles seemed so small. I was hoping they would place them at the bottom

black edge of the widescreen, but they didn't, so it took a while to figure out what

was going on. I'll have to see it again so I can get the full impact.

 

 

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Hey, bild . . . may I recommend "Moontide" (1942) with Gabin, Ida Lupino, and Claude Rains (who plays a sorta homosexually in-the-closet character). I find it quite entertaining. Here's what Netflix has to say about it:

 

 

<After a bender on the waterfront, longshoreman Bobo (great French star Jean Gabin) fears he may have committed murder and quickly finds work on a remote barge, where he rescues beautiful waitress Anna (Ida Lupino) from suicide. As love blooms for the pair, Bobo's shady friend Tiny (Thomas Mitchell) uses the murder as blackmail in this melancholy drama, scripted by novelist John O'Hara. Cinematographer Charles G. Clarke was nominated for an Oscar.>

 

 

Were you referring to the 1972 Russian version of "Solaris?" If so, do give it a try again when you have the time. I have it on DVD and find the subtitles of perfect size.

 

 

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I got a kick out of Touchez Pas au Grisbi with Jean Gabin as the (relatively) suave

old time crook who has seen it all before and knows the score and can still

make it with the younger ladies

 

I especially got a kick out of seeing it in prime time. The weekly imports at 2am (Eastern time) as Sunday becomes Monday are a bit fatiguing on the eyes given the hour. I got a DVD recorder in late August and two recordings of foreign titles were screwed up by my cable company's insistence that I push a button to avoid getting turned off. So, when INFERNAL AFFAIRS aired, I stayed awake with the remote just to zap that bug if it showed up.

 

Sure enough, it did, about halfway through the film. As I was there to catch it, it only obscured the film for about five seconds, but between that and the testing of the emergency broadcast signal, quite a few of my late night recordings have been ruined.

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It sounds interesting. I've been watching a lot of movies on YouTube lately.

I know it's not the optimal way to watch movies, but it's better than the

alternative of not seeing them at all, and you can set your own schedule.

Fortunately, both Moontide and Solaris are on YT in good visual condition.

I'll have to watch them over the next few days. It wasn't so much the length

of the original version of Solaris as the fact that it started late at night, but

I managed to stay up till the end.

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I can stay up till 2 a.m. to see a movie, but not one that starts at 2 a.m.

If I recorded movies I'd just have a large pile of unwatched movies so I

don't bother with that anymore. I hope you will have better luck with yours.

 

I enjoyed the scene early in the movie where Gabin is at the restaurant with

his partner and the two women. One of them mentions they are going to

be mermaids at the nightclub later on. Then somebody says they're really

good as mermaids and Gabin says something like Yes, I can just imagine,

IOW, I've seen it all before. Ho hum.

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I hear that, bild. I'm out by 9 p.m. these days. Must overcome being too cheap to pay Comcast for DVR capabilities because I know there's much on TCM late night that I'm missing.

 

 

If you do decide to go the DVD route for "Moontide," there's a special features docu about Gabin's career that's really informative.

 

 

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> {quote:title=dpompper wrote:}{quote}

> Must overcome being too cheap to pay Comcast for DVR capabilities because I know there's much on TCM late night that I'm missing.

 

I will suggest that you buy a DVD recorder. It is a one-time expense instead of being a monthly fee. It lacks the schedule capability but that can be a good thing because it is often wise to begin recordings several minutes earlier than the scheduled time and letting it run ten or fifteen minutes after because not all clocks agree and the schedules often contain subtle errors.

 

You can use re-recordable disks if it is only for time-shifting and so save things that you can not watch immediately and yet have full capacity by inserting a new disk.

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> {quote:title=Bildwasser wrote:}{quote} I've been watching a lot of movies on YouTube lately.

 

Mosfilm has many of their movies available on YouTube. They have their own channel.

 

Some movies have English subtitles.

 

You must use the Closed Captioning icon in the bar below the image and then select the language for the subtitles with many of their movies.

 

It is sad to say that some of their best movies have no subtitles and the subtitles which appear using Closed Captioning are garbled to the point that they are useless.

 

The selection is quite varied. Two of my favorites are *Jolly Fellows* (1934) and *Formula of Love* (1984).

http://youtu.be/chDRXQ77IgA

http://youtu.be/HCvfvXHnLoY

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I hate giving China imports, err, Walmart the business, but so far the the only place I've seen these units offered is from their online store.

 

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Magnavox-HDD-and-DVD-Recorder-with-Digital-Tuner-Choose-Your-Capacity./20710260

 

They are DVRs with digital tuners and a DVD burner/recorder/player and now they come with Hard drives from 320 gb - 500 gb - 1 tb, as options.

 

I still have a couple I bought years ago with the relatively miniscule 160 gb drives, but they still work great. Recorded 1000's of dvds from them, and they're still holding up.

 

(I only use high quality Taiyo Yuden or genuine Verbatim DVDs for burning and so far I've only averaged one coaster per 200-300 Dvds, far less than 1 percent defect rate, and likely some of those were my fault. And those DVD manufacturers still use the best, longest lived dyes, for maximum lifespan of the DVDs)

 

I like these DVRs because with the built-in tuner and a cable or satellite provider I can program what I want, when I want for as long as the HD capacity allows, then edit and burn what I want to keep, and erase what I don't, when I need back some HD space. For myself and others, they have proven themselves as quite reliable.

(one of the bummers with my cable providers is when they interrupt the broadcast with tests, and sometimes there will be provider signal failures or pixilations & freezeups, really frustrating when I play back a recording that I've been looking forward to. But i can always delete it and re-record it if & when it plays again, hopefully with a better signal. Then, if its a keeper, I can always burn it from the HD to a disk for an additional back-up)

 

Also these units belong to me so I don't "rent it" from the cable provider, and so far I haven't encountered any blocks to my televised recordings. But then I usually only record from TCM & PBS (both commercial free), sometimes the History channel, discovery channel & animal planet, but those networks are a bummer editing out the commercials when I find something I really want, but I can & have done it, just takes more time to do so.

 

I strongly recommend one of these units over a simple dvd recorder without a hard drive or a tuner.

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> {quote:title=RMeingast wrote:}{quote}I wouldn't mind seeing something like "Marketa Lazarova" as I haven't seen it for years...

> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marketa_Lazarov%C3%A1

>

> But TCM would have to work on the film rights and all that jazz...

> All you can do is suggest a film...

>

That's a Janus Films title in North America, Criterion should be porting the Czech Blu-ray sometime soon, so TCM could eventually and most definitely should get hold of it. (In the meantime, this is great value for money: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Frantisek-Vlacil-Collection-discs-DVD/dp/B003S4LENM)

 

And I can personally vouch that Suggest a Movie does work for anyone who doubts...but it depends on who releases the films. It seems like TCM is reluctant to license titles from New Yorker Films, or perhaps New Yorker asks too much for their titles. That's a shame, as they hold a lot of things I'd like to see on TCM.

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> {quote:title=Stephan55 wrote:}{quote}

> I still have a couple I bought years ago with the relatively miniscule 160 gb drives, but they still work great. Recorded 1000's of dvds from them, and they're still holding up.

 

We have two of them. One is with the original drive and the other has had a larger drive installed. The primary one had done more than two thousand movies. The greatest problem is that it must be disassembled and have the hub cleaned periodically because build-up causes recording problems. I believe this is nearly a twice-a-year procedure.

 

> Also these units belong to me so I don't "rent it" from the cable provider, and so far I haven't encountered any blocks to my televised recordings.

 

IFC, FMC and Disney were problems before we mostly stopped watching those channels. There was one Sherlock Holmes movie on TCM which was blocked one time but there was no explanation for it and it has not happened again. It is sad to say that movie has not been aired again since then so our copy is a dupe from a collection which has not been restored to the beautiful levels of those aired by TCM.

 

> I strongly recommend one of these units over a simple dvd recorder without a hard drive or a tuner.

 

I presented the idea of a DVD recorder and re-recordable disks because I am a great believer in cheap learning curves. It should cost only approx. one-third of buying a recorder with HD and it will still be usable if the person decides to later invest in an HD unit because there comes to all a time when they wish to record two programs at the same time.

 

I like electronics from Wal-Mart because they are serviceable units which gives the experience a person needs so they know what features and qualities they want when they are ready to invest in higher-grade unit.

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My local cinema is having a 70mm festival later this month. I hope to go to *Ryan's Daughter*, which (despite its initial reception) I like alot and haven't seen since its release. The film will be shown with Swedish subtitles! So, I will be watching a British film about Irish people, shot in Ireland, directed by a Brit, with many American actors, at a movie theater on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, with Swedish subtitles!

 

All the other films in the series (apart from one East German entry) are in English without subtitles.

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