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THE LOVES OF PHAROAH (1922) on TCM Tonight


gagman66
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:) Just a quick reminder TCM is debuting the brand new restoration of Ernst Lubitsch *THE LOVES OF PHARAOH* with Emil Jannings on TCM this evening in Prime-time Airing at 8:00 PM, Eastern 7:00 Central time. This a stunning multi-tinted print with a a reprisal of the original 1921 Orchestral score and it is spectacular.

 

Here is the awesome Restoration Trailer.

 

 

 

 

 

www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=VNSqu6HdSb8

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Problem is there were numerous missing scenes filled in with still photos. Five times as many as with BARDELYS THE MAGNIFICENT. Hopefully some of that lost footage will turn up yet. Still the entire movie had been considered lost for some 80 years. So we are fortunate to have as much as we do. Tremendous musical score and outstanding print quality.

 

This is on DVD and Blu-ray from Alphas-Omega in Region 2 format. But hasn't been released in the States. I think I would have preferred the American ending. The European one was to depressing. I'm pleased that TCM was able to pick this up so quickly.

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So sorry I didn't notice it was on until I saw this thread! I caught part of the ending, it looks great. Mady Christians is in it -- she was the original Mama in I Remember Mama on B'way. Guess who played her son Nels: Marlon Brando, in his stage debut.

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Epic Lubitsch is unfortunately pretty indistinct. I've always found Paul Wegener's face off-putting. Nothing against that great ham Emil Jannings but he needs a lot of exterior work to shine (people like Murnau and Sternberg knew how to channel his intensity and make it productive.) The two romantic leads flatline.

 

Since Griffith and DeMille were brought up in the intro - This has none of the small touches that made Griffith, even epic Griffith, great (or the later greater Lubitsch for that matter) nor is it willing to go gloriously over the top the way DeMille at his best could.

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I turned it off after it began. Wasn't interested. I'm into silent comedy (Chaplin, Keaton , Lloyd,etc).

 

I enjoyed Shop Around The Corner. I pictured that shop boss laughing like a looney in a strait-jacket in a padded cell after he tried to shoot himself. :^0

Tonight was the first time I seen Shop Around The Corner.

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I was looking forward to this one, but have to admit I bailed after about 30 minutes; it just didn't grab me. What's great, though, is that TCM continues to provide us with opportunities to see these films, and then judge for ourselves. Even if I don't personally like a film, I am always interested in the threads to see what other people have to say about it. The fact that they are here for us at all is a gift!

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>there were numerous missing scenes filled in with still photos.

 

I thought the restorers did a good job with the stills. They filled in the gaps just right.

 

With an old film like this, with big sets, a cast of thousands, old-fashioned looking characters, and full elaborate costumes, and being very old, it looks to me like it could be a 3,000 year old Egyptian film found in a tomb somewhere. LOL, yes, I know it's not that old, but I'm willing to go along with the intent of the film-makers with a few films like this. :)

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> Problem is there were numerous missing scenes filled in with still photos.

 

It wasn't as bad as *Greed*, which has about an hour and a half of that.

 

(Goldwyn should have commissioned a 140-minute version of *Greed* in the first place. I'm sure von Stroheim could have made a great 140-minute film if that was his intent.)

 

Edited by: Fedya on Dec 8, 2012 2:14 PM, to correct the studio

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No fan of Silent films but I said I would give it a try for a few minutes. "The Loves of Pharoah" grabbed me from the start. The sets, the costumes, the simple but entertaining plot, the acting, especially Emil Jannings, the sweeping cinematography. It out De-milled Demille in many scenes Even .in this computerized era, "The Loves of Pharoah"is amazing in epic scope. How in the world did they do it with so much realism? I also learned the way the Egyptians put criminals to death by crushing them. Interesting. But I wonder if that was historically correct.

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I doubt much if anything in the movie was historically accurate.

 

The ancients did have many horrifying ways of executing people. Those who aren't squeamish may enjoy reading about [scaphism|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scaphism], which was practiced in ancient Persia.

 

ObMovies: For a fun if not particularly good movie set in ancient Persia, try *Esther and the King*.

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