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Happy Hanukkah!


RMeingast
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Happy Hanukkah to all!

 

Know I'm a few days late but better late than never...

 

TCM Classic Film Union bloggers doing "Eight Films of Hanukkah" and you can view their choices here (one a day):

http://fan.tcm.com/_Hanukkah-Movie-Countdown/blog/6484911/66470.html?b

 

Anybody have any other choices for classic films that could be aired during Hanukkah??

 

Wegener's 1920 silent "The Golem: How He Came Into the World," maybe:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Golem:_How_He_Came_into_the_World

 

Or John Huston's 1966 epic "The Bible: In the Beginning": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bible:_In_the_Beginning

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Happy Hanukkah to all my Jewish friends.

 

I think maybe TCM should air "The Diary of Anne Frank." What a beautiful soul that young girl had, and "Gentlemen's Agreement" although many question why the "holocaust" was not even mentioned in that film, and many people wanted Gregory Peck's character to end up with Celeste Holm's character.

 

Never understood all this hate towards the Jewish people. Especially from Christians, when our Lord and Savior was a Jew!

 

Lori

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I've been saying for years that TCM should have a Hanukkah film festival early in December. There are plenty of films available, many that TCM has already shown, but shown at random times during the year. Symphony of Six Million (1932) would be a good one.

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0023545/

 

Hey, I'll bet I'm the only guy on this board who remembers the original airing of Molly Goldberg's story about her grandchildren and the Hanukkah bush she bought for them. :)

 

Molly was played on TV from 1949 to 1951 by Gertrude Berg.

 

Back in those early days we didn't have a TV of our own, but we occasionally watched a few TV programs in cafes and bars that had TVs to attract customers. There weren't many shows on the networks back then, and the networks went off the air by about 9 or 10 pm.

 

Of course I didn't know what Molly was talking about, but that was a story I filed away in the back of my kid's mind, hoping to learn more about its meaning later in life. And I did. :)

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Molly was played on TV from 1949 to 1951 by Gertrude Berg.

 

The show ran longer than that. The CBS version ended in 1951, but it went on to NBC, then Dumont and then in a syndicated version in 1955 that had the family move out of the Bronx.

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Yesterday at Mass while we were lighting our Advent wreath candles I realized that Menorahs had likewise been lit up in temples all over the world the night before and would be all this week. Then in the congregational prayer Hanukkah was acknowledged and all those celebrating it were included in the petition. I felt a union with all of you who are Jewish which is how I wish we all could feel regardless of how we worship. As Lori said this is how the One we Christians worship began.

 

it's also nice getting eight simple gifts, preferably homemade, rather than all the commercial high-end stuff the rest of us feel pressured to buy. I hope we all have a safe holiday time.

 

 

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Might not be good idea to have a formal scheduled event for Hanukkah films on TCM...

 

Sounds like a good idea on the face of it, but then you'd probably have to do it for everybody...

 

For example, Diwali was last month: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diwali

 

Kwanzaa coming up later this month: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwanzaa

 

Most Eastern Orthodox have their celebrations in January...

 

And so on for every religion...

 

Maybe better to toss a few films on the schedule informally...

 

Or maybe not, and TCM should stay away from religion as well as politics?

 

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}I've been saying for years that TCM should have a Hanukkah film festival early in December. There are plenty of films available, many that TCM has already shown, but shown at random times during the year. Symphony of Six Million (1932) would be a good one.

>

> http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0023545/

>

> Hey, I'll bet I'm the only guy on this board who remembers the original airing of Molly Goldberg's story about her grandchildren and the Hanukkah bush she bought for them. :)

>

> Molly was played on TV from 1949 to 1951 by Gertrude Berg.

>

> Back in those early days we didn't have a TV of our own, but we occasionally watched a few TV programs in cafes and bars that had TVs to attract customers. There weren't many shows on the networks back then, and the networks went off the air by about 9 or 10 pm.

>

> Of course I didn't know what Molly was talking about, but that was a story I filed away in the back of my kid's mind, hoping to learn more about its meaning later in life. And I did. :)

 

Thank you Fred, Lori, and others for your kind sentiments, but that being said, speaking as a Jew I feel the need to correct, perhaps, a few misconceptions. First, while it is true that all Jews celebrate Hannukah in their own way, the fact of the matter is that to believing Jews, Hannukah is only a post Biblical festival and a very minor festival at that. Of much more importance to Jews are the HIGH HOLY days in late summer early fall, PASSOVER in MARCH/APRIL, and the most important day the SABBATH, which falls out from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday every weekend of the year. From the Jewish point of view, Hannukah sort of became the Jewish alternative to Christmas in the 50s and 60s in response to all the Christmas advertising for toys that appeared on the new medium of Television. The reason is obvious. From the Christian perspective Hanukkah, because of it's close proximity to Christmas, was always regarded as the Jewish Christmas, at least that was the understanding of my non Jewish friends and co-workers. So, while I am proud of Hannukah and I celebrate it, it is not the most important Jewish Holiday of the year. And, at least from a religious perspective, it is by no means as important as the religious significance of Christmas or for that matter Easter which ARE Christianitys' two Holiest days of the year.

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Infinite, as a member of your tribe (if you don't mind that phrase), I was thinking of chiming in, too. Chanukah (the spelling I am most familiar with) is an enjoyable holiday commemorating a historic event, but never (as far as I know) one with truly deep religious significance. But of course, the Jewish people are a people as well as a religion, so both sorts of celebrations (historical and religious) are important.

 

The larger picture, of course, is that both holidays -- Chanukah and Christmas -- were probably superimposed on old pagan festivals. The date of Jesus' birth is not mentioned in the Bible and was not always as widely celebrated as is it today. Puritans actually forbade the celebration of Christmas at one time. Much of the current modes of celebration were influenced as much (if not more) by Dickens and the Victorians and other writers as by religion. (The Roman Christians were probably influenced by pagan holidays and selected the winter date to coincide with them).

 

In any case, I hope none of this is offensive to anyone. I've always enjoyed Christmas, the one holiday dedicated to the celebration of the birth of a Jew! Also my degree is in Theology -- and I studied at a Jesuit University.

 

If anyone is offended by anything I've said here, please let me know, and I'll delete this post. I've posted it only as my idea of a clarification related to the other posts in this thread.

 

Happy Chanukah -- Merry Christmas!

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I guess Kwanzaa doesn't have any religious connotations?

 

Anyway, op/ed piece about Hanukkah in "New York Times" last Friday

("The True Meaning of Hanukkah"):

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/08/opinion/hanukkah-unabridged.html?_r=0

 

I have friends who celebrate the eight days and that's why I brought it up...

As the festival started last Saturday: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanukkah

 

Anybody come up with any Kwanzaa classic films??

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In general, films with Jewish themes don't focus on the Jewish holidays, apart from The Jazz Singer (Yom Kippur) and The Ten Commandments (origin of Passover). There must be other films which have a fleeting holiday scene of one of the many holidays. Jewish rituals (e.g. weddings) do turn up in Fiddler on the Roof, The Chosen, etc., perhaps because they present such cinematic possibilities. What about Woody Allen? Doesn't Crimes and Misdemeanors feature a Passover scene? The Museum of Modern Art did a brilliant festival of Yiddish cinema many years ago, where I saw some of the Joe Green and Edgar Ulmer Yiddish films for the first time, but I don't remember any explicit holiday scenes.

 

 

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}I, as one of the "Tribe", don't recall a single film in which Chanukah plays a major part. Are there any? For films with Jewish themes, some of my favorites are THE PAWNBROKER, THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK, EXODUS, GOODBYE COLUMBUS, and CROSSING DELANCEY.

 

 

There are a few modern films that deal specifically with Hanukkah/Chanukkah such as:

 

"The Hebrew Hammer": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hebrew_Hammer

 

"Adam Sandler's Eight Crazy Nights": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight_Crazy_Nights

 

From 1984, there's a 24 minute animated feature called "Lights" with voices by Judd Hirsch, Leonard Nimoy and Paul Michael Glaser: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0439678/

 

But I wanted to focus on classic films so as to stick to what TCM covers...

 

Hollywood screenwriter and producer Roni Keller makes a connection between Hanukkah/Chanukkah and the Golem in this article ("The Golems of Hanukkah"):

 

http://www.culturalweekly.com/the-golems-of-hanukkah.html

 

Keller wrote the novel "Evie and The Golem" she writes about above.

 

And she's not the only one who links the Golem with Hanukkah/Chanukkah.

Author Eric Kimmel has done it too with his book "The Golem's Latkes":

http://www.reading.org/general/Publications/blog/BlogSinglePost/engage/2012/12/07/5-questions-with-eric-a-kimmel-hershel-and-the-hanukkah-goblins#.UMdYbqyPsSE

 

In this Hillel article, referring to the flick "The Hebrew Hammer," it talks about the hero of that film basically being a modern day Golem who saves Chanukah:

http://www.hillel.org/jewish/holidays/chanukah/hebrew_hammer/golem.htm

 

This book, "Flickipedia" (Atkinson, Michael, and Laurel Shifrin. Flickipedia: Perfect Films for Every Occasion, Holiday, Mood, Ordeal, and Whim. Chicago, Ill.: Chicago Review Press, 2008.)

has something for everbody and includes a section on Chanukah:

http://books.google.ca/books?id=KSVwac0qDIEC&pg=PT19&lpg=PT19&dq=chanukahfilmsthe+golem&source=bl&ots=YbVAb_Aj6x&sig=Ea7v6i9gO3vw4bLRftZENqj_kM0&hl=en&sa=X&ei=u1zHUJjfHM-k2gW90IGACA&ved=0CCsQ6AEwADgU#v=onepage&q=chanukah%20films%20the%20golem&f=false

 

It lists, among others, the 1920 silent "The Golem" and also a movie from 1975, "Hester Street":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hester_Street_%28film%29

 

So it seems like the Golem gets referred to a bit in relation to Chanukah/Hanukkah related to the theme of, as Roni Keller writes, Jewish defiance...

 

Wegener's 1920 silent "The Golem: How He Came Into the World" is the only one of his three films about the Golem that still exists: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Golem:_How_He_Came_into_the_World

 

Then there's the 1936 film "Le Golem": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Golem

 

There's also the 1966 film "It!" but that flick doesn't really have much to do with the theme of Jewish triumph over adversity. The Golem is just a monster in that movie: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It!_%281966_film%29

 

Anyway, Kwanzaa coming up, so better start thinking on that one too before I send out the Kwanzaa greetings...

 

 

P.S. The Hanukkah Movie Countdown by TCM Classic Film Union bloggers GalDorothy and CatGlinda has sorta quieted down after only a 2nd movie:

http://fan.tcm.com/_Hanukkah-Movie-Countdown/blog/6484911/66470.html?samlUserId=42274107

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My wife loves watching those Hallmark movie channel Christmas movies. So I often get stuck struggling through them. One piece o' crap flick they had was about a girl and a guy who agree to be each other's "dates" during the holiday season so their families would get off their backs about their love lives. The guy was Catholic and the girl was Jewish. At one point, the girl's parents, thinking the guy was also Jewish, wanted to meet his parents. So, the guy tells HIS parents he's converting for HER.

 

 

In the only amusing segment in the movie, when the girl's parents show up at the guy's parents home, they had gone overboard with the decorations. A blinking star of David on top of the Christmas tree, and because the girl's brother couldn't find enough Mennorahs, had instead KWANZAA candle holders all over the house! "What? They look practically the SAME!" Outside of that, the rest of the movie was a bust.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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>Thank you Fred, Lori, and others for your kind sentiments, but that being said, speaking as a Jew I feel the need to correct, perhaps, a few misconceptions. First, while it is true that all Jews celebrate Hannukah in their own way, the fact of the matter is that to believing Jews, Hannukah is only a post Biblical festival and a very minor festival at that. Of much more importance to Jews are the HIGH HOLY days in late summer early fall, PASSOVER in MARCH/APRIL, and the most important day the SABBATH, which falls out from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday every weekend of the year. From the Jewish point of view, Hannukah sort of became the Jewish alternative to Christmas in the 50s and 60s in response to all the Christmas advertising for toys that appeared on the new medium of Television. The reason is obvious. From the Christian perspective Hanukkah, because of it's close proximity to Christmas, was always regarded as the Jewish Christmas, at least that was the understanding of my non Jewish friends and co-workers. So, while I am proud of Hannukah and I celebrate it, it is not the most important Jewish Holiday of the year. And, at least from a religious perspective, it is by no means as important as the religious significance of Christmas or for that matter Easter which ARE Christianitys' two Holiest days of the year.

 

Thanks for all that information. Over the years I've recorded off TCM a number of Jewish-oriented family oriented movies which have remained somewhat un-noticed for decades, so I know there are some to show. And of course most Christmas movies are mainly winter, snow, December, shopping, and family oriented movies. One time I was in my local bank and I saw a guy and his wife who I think were from India, and their little daughter had a book about Santa. And the Native Americans out where I live are really big on the holiday spirit, so are the Hispanics. It's like a mad-house every year inside Wal-Mart. Not quite the religious part of Christmas, but certainly an old American tradition for nearly everyone. :) I think between your holiday group and mine, we represent about 85% of all Americans.

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Yes, by all means.....and Happy Holidays to everybody on here.

 

I really like George Burns in " Oh God ", ( not the sequels)....Looking like an old George Burns, God says, " I take this form because it's something you can relate to. If you saw me as I am, you couldn't handle it ". .......When asked, was Jesus your son ? God answers, " Yes, Jesus was my son, Mohammed was my son, David and Moses were my sons, Budda and Gandhi were my sons, the man who had no room at the inn was my son and so is the guy that charges too much for a steak in this one ". ....When John Denver says he doesn't even belong to any one religion, God says, " Neither do I ". ........but I really like the ending as God leaves the courtroom invisible, " I gave you everything you need to make it work. You can make it work. Try to stop the fighting, it really gets in the way. If sometimes you find it hard to believe in me, maybe it would help you to know that I believe in you. "

 

So Happy Holidays....I've noticed many that preach and protest and war against other religions....Perhaps the perfect Christmas song is, " Let there be peace on earth.....but let it begin with me " ......Maybe it's not about future Miss Americas saying they want a Utopia World Peace, maybe it has to begin with me and inside each of each of us. " Let there be peace on earth, but let it begin with me ".

 

I must add the late Negro League baseball player and Chicago Cubs coach, Buck Leonard. I saw him speak at Wright State University a year before he died. He said " People think I should be more angry about not being allowed to play in the all white major leagues, but I got to play baseball. We had our own league and God gave me the ability to play baseball. God let me play BASEBALL !!!! Please sing with me. I believe for every drop of rain that falls, a flower grows. I believe that somewhere in the dark somewhere is one that knows. Everytime I see a newborn baby cry, or touch a leaf, or see the sky, then I know why, I Believe "........I had seen him on Ken Burns Baseball but it was the only time I would see him in person. I went to hear about baseball. I felt like this old black man truely walked with God before he died, as if an angel stood beside him on the stage. I can't explain it, it was just his spirit that swept over me and hopefully others in the audience.

Edited by: WhyaDuck on Dec 11, 2012 2:44 PM

 

Edited by: WhyaDuck on Dec 11, 2012 3:15 PM

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}

> Hey, I'll bet I'm the only guy on this board who remembers the original airing of Molly Goldberg's story about her grandchildren and the Hanukkah bush she bought for them. :)

>

>

 

 

 

You're showing your age Fred. I shouldn't admit it, but I remember the show too, of course I was just a little kid back then so it must have been the later episodes. :)

 

If you'd like to see some them again here's a great, absolutely free, online site that has thousands of old TV shows, some dating back into the 1940s. I doubt that it has all the episodes but it does have at least some of "The Goldbergs" shows. Just scan down the list and click on Television. http://archive.org/details/television They also have thousands of movies too, but all are in public domain.

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> {quote:title=RMeingast wrote:}{quote}

>

> P.S. The Hanukkah Movie Countdown by TCM Classic Film Union bloggers GalDorothy and CatGlinda has sorta quieted down after only a 2nd movie:

> http://fan.tcm.com/_Hanukkah-Movie-Countdown/blog/6484911/66470.html?samlUserId=42274107

>

 

The bloggers hit a snag. It takes up to 3 days for TCM to approve blog contents, so they couldn't post one per day... But rest will eventually turn up... Live and learn...

At least they'll know for next year, etc., to get all 8 films in one blog for the week...

 

So they did blogs for two of the eight films. The rest are: "Gentleman's Agreement," "The Diary of Anne Frank," "The Chosen," "Yentl," "Life is Beautiful," and "Fiddler on the Roof."

 

Don't like their choices. Let them know when their blogs about those other 6 films appear...

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Finance, There's truth to that, but Christmas too has been a relatively recent creation as a big celebrated holiday (19th century) and was originally not celebrated much more than Chanukah. And of course the date comes from the Roman Christians wanting to "compete" with the pagan winter festivals.

 

 

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and yet I had a Jahovas Witness tell me Easter is a pagan holiday based on druids and hence the reason for rabbits and such.....still, for somebody that claimed he knew everything about everything, he was pretty messed up......So I'll just say: HAPPY HOLIDAYS TO ALL OF YOU.

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