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Sepiatone

Dreadful movie songs

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I agree with so many of the titles that have been mentioned here.

 

 

Let us not forget, though, that perhaps it's the OVERPLAYING that exacerbated our disdain. In small doses, some of them are less objectionable than others. So let's blame, once again, capitalism and the drive for the almighty dollar . . . and the formula that suggests: playing the crap out of movie music = consumers will give us more $ for music, moviegoing, DVD, etc.

 

 

(Mea culpa. I had some of Marilyn's favorite pink tea for breakfast.)

 

 

As for "In the Air," I have an appreciation for the drums . . . the tension that builds and then explodes . . . whatever that's called. I'm not a musician and don't know the language.

 

 

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I hated "Take My Breath Away"'s Oscar win because I hate the way the title sits/scans on the accompanying notes ("you take my breath uh-uh-way" violates basic songwriting rules, and not in a good way).

 

 

 

I don't dislike the song "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head" but hate the way it's shoehorned into the movie just for an Oscar nomination. The 60's Bachrach/David/New York pop sound also seems shoehorned onto the period the film's set in. Soundtracks are one thing; songs inserted into a film either as scoring (as this is) or sung by a character in a film (when the song itself is out of period) are another level of egregiousness. The song Dorothy Provine sings in "The Great Race" isn't a bad song, but seems way more 50s/60s than from the late 19th century.

 

 

 

I agree with the poster who said some songs cited are not so much bad songs as they were songs the public got sick of by being overplayed.

 

 

 

It's kind of the opposite topic, but there have been plenty of catchy title songs that accompanied B- or C-level movies, such as "The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes," or "the House of Seven Joys" from "The Wrecking Crew."

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Hmm... Interresting that most of the songs that suck came out in the 70s & 80s. I've been trying to think of a lousy movie song from the 30s or 40s and can't come up with a one.

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How many times have you heard THIS song?

 

 

Note to self: Must check the cupboard for pink tea.

 

 

What pithy thing do you suppose Drew will have to say about this 1973 film?

 

 

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Maybe I'm thick, but what do the lyrics of "Raindrops Keep Falling......." have to do with the plot of BUTCH CASSIDY? Bacharach and David did much better songs that were featured in films, such as "The Look of Love", "Here I Am", and "The April Fools".

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Look at the Oscar winner for Best Song in the last 15 years. It's enough to make you cry.

 

Sometimes it's not familiarity that can make you hate a song. I only have to hear 30 seconds of that clackety-clack thing from HIGH NOON and I want to turn off the movie.

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You got it. "New York, New York" ("Start spreading the news...) is a song for *outsiders, *not for natives. I find it to be a nasty, overly aggressive message about people coming to New York from other parts of the country to express their egomania. The top New York song for me will always be the first song I ever learned, the song that identified NYC in films for decades: "The Sidewalks of New York." When Ralph Bellamy as FDR goes to the podium to nominate Al Smith, at the end of Sunrise at Campobello, and the orchestra plays "The Sidewalks of New York," which ends the movie, it gives me goosebumps. Here it is at the start of a Buster Keaton film:

 

I was born at 352 W 110th St, across the street from Morningside Park, so I think that at at least qualifies me as a "Native New Yorker". And speaking as a current New Yorker at heart and a lifelong Yankee fan, I get goosebumps whenever I hear Sinatra wrap up a Yankee win.

 

 

But that doesn't mean that I don't like those other songs mentioned here. When the Yanks came to Baltimore in the 70's, the PA system played Odyssey's "Native New Yorker", and that one gave me the shivers, too. And when the Giants invaded Griffith Stadium in the 50's, I'd practically cry when the Redskins band struck up "The Sidewalks of New York." Yeah, I guess that'll always be my favorite, too.

 

 

But then there's Ella's "I'll take Manhattan", and even though I wish she'd put in a plug for Horn & Hardart (since I've never been to Childs), that's still up there.

 

 

I also can't leave out "Lullaby of Broadway." That song is so terrific that it stops me from shooting the TV every time Gold Diggers of 1935 comes on. It's the only thing about that movie that inspires me to romance rather than to thoughts of mayhem.

 

And last but not least, "Lullaby of Birdland". Can't possibly forget that one.

 

 

So what other city can come up with a sextet like that? San Francisco's got Tony Bennett, but forget that "Flower in Your Hair" piece of FDA-rejected saccharine, and even if you give it the theme song from the Gable movie (which I don't), that still leaves it four short. Chicago's got "That Toddlin' Town" plus the worst song Sinatra ever recorded. There's gotta be something else out there, but what?

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}Maybe I'm thick, but what do the lyrics of "Raindrops Keep Falling......." have to do with the plot of BUTCH CASSIDY? Bacharach and David did much better songs that were featured in films, such as "The Look of Love", "Here I Am", and "The April Fools".

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRmuEq2Is9xsGRbrxf0a_q

 

I thought it worked really well actually. That's always been one of my favorite scenes. That and also the end of Bob Carol Ted and Alice when they played the Bacharach/David song "What the World Needs Now is Love". I loved that.

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I was going to post some of the Lullaby of Broadway lyrics, but it just wasn't the same without hearing Wini Shaw sing it.

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I agree with you, but, with respect, not about that one song, although it is hard not to be moved by it. So many great New York songs. When I was a small boy, my mother would sing "Lullaby of B'way" to me to get me to sleep. I thought it was about me, because of the line, "Manhattan babies don't sleep tight...until the dawn"!

 

Decades later, I produced a series of concerts featuring New York songs, to celebrate the centennial of the 1898 consolidation of the five boroughs as NYC. I dug up every song and piece of instrumental music I could, classical and pop, from The Staten Island Gentleman to The Banks of the Bronx to Spanish Harlem to Give My Regards to the Comden/Green/Bernstein New York New York to Bock/Harnick Little Old New York to The Bowery, etc. But, spiteful, selfish creature that I am, I left out the Kander/Ebb New York New York (but I have to admit it is a rousing tune).

 

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Well, while you two freakin' "New Yawkers" are fighin' over that, excuse me here while I break into song about MY old hometown...a song that I think EVERYBODY would agree perfectly captures the spirit of that city...

 

(...oh, and if you're wonderin', this song WAS featured in the movie Naked Gun...and NOW without further adieu...)

 

Hate New York City

It's cold and it's damp

And all the people dressed like monkeys

Let's leave Chicago to the Eskimos

That town's a little bit too rugged

For you and me you bad girl

 

Rollin' down the Imperial Highway

With a big nasty redhead at my side

Santa Ana winds blowin' hot from the north

And we as born to ride

 

Roll down the window put down the top

Crank up the Beach Boys baby

Don't let the music stop

We're gonna ride it till we just can't ride it no more

 

From the South Bay to the Valley

From the West Side to the East Side

Everybody's very happy

'Cause the sun is shining all the time

Looks like another perfect day

 

I love L.A. (We love it)

I love L.A. (We love it)

 

Look at that mountain

Look at those trees

Look at that bum over there, man

He's down on his knees

Look at these women

There ain't nothin' like 'em nowhere

 

Century Boulevard (We love it)

Victory Boulevard (We love it)

Santa Monica Boulevard (We love it)

Sixth Street (We love it, we love it)

 

I love L.A.

I love L.A.

(We love it)

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I was going to post some of the Lullaby of Broadway lyrics, but it just wasn't the same without hearing Wini Shaw sing it.

 

[At your service, Slayton.....|http://www.myspace.com/video/angus-t-cat/lullaby-of-broadway/8454135]

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Here's another good one, originally from the 1953 Broadway show Hazel Flagg, a musical version of the film Nothing Sacred.

 

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Hey Dargo, that's a good song, but don't you wish this poem from The Loved One had been set to music?

 

They told me, Francis Hinsley, they told me you were hung

With red protruding eye-balls and black protruding tongue;

I wept as I remembered how often you and I

Had laughed about Los Angeles and now ’tis here you’ll lie;

Here pickled in formaldehyde and painted like a ****,

Shrimp-pink incorruptible, not lost nor gone before.

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Good reply there, Swithin. That off-the-wall 1965 black comedy is also a great...for want of a better word..."treatise" on the...once again, for want of a better word..."feel" of L.A., alright! ;)

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"Kokomo"

"Don't Worry, Be Happy"

"Wind Beneath My Wings"

"My Heart Will Go On"

"Endless Love"

"I Don't Want to Miss a Thing"

"Unchained Melody" (revived by Ghost)

 

And more, but it's going to be hard enough getting these out of my head.

 

Eta: my apologies if anyone danced to any of the above tunes at your wedding (though if you did, why?! Sorry...)

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Hilarious thread! I especially like the word "dreadful".

 

Although I've never cared for Springsteen (based on his hits) I know many who adore him based on his performances & non-hit songs. I agree Philadelphia the movie & song are both stinko.

Phil Collins is just awful. I think the complaint here is the overplaying of any movie song becomes tiring. Imagine working in a store that plays these middling hits endlessly-you'd hate them too.

 

Movie themes can also play endlessly during the film and actually distract your concentration. Around The World in 80 Days, Dr Zhivago and that Orson Welles balailaika theme song come to mind.

 

The person who mentioned Tim Rice/AL Webber's cellpool of mis-tunes was spot on. And I nominate Danny Elfman as the heir to that genre. How can anyone defend his tuneless mess of sounds as "good music"? There's zero melody, structure or flow to his flat songs-the Nightmare Before Christmas makes me want to pull my hair out.

 

I suppose someone had to follow music poser Johnny Williams. It's as if they can hide bad music behind the grandness of a full orchestra. The aforementioned Randy Newman at least has real musical education behind him-AND IT SHOWS.

 

And Sepiatone- I have always been into electronic music (I'm a theramin player) While I own all of Vangelis's LPs and enjoyed him, Chariots Of Fire was definitely past his high point. So many others did it so much better, as you say.

Also please note: a new movie biography has been made about electronic music granddaddy Raymond Scott called "Deconstructing Dad" can't wait to see it!

 

Give me a Gershwin or Irving Berlin tune in a movie ANY day. You'll leave happy & humming.

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A pretty dreadful song, though one that fits its movie, is the title song from Spider Baby (1968), sung by Lon Chaney, Jr. over the opening credits:

 

 

Screams and moans and bats and bones

Teenage monsters in haunted homes

The ghosts on the stair

The vampires bite

Better beware, there's a full moon tonight

 

Cannibal spiders creep and crawl

Boys and ghouls having a ball

Frankenstein, Dracula and even the Mummy

Are sure to end up in someone's tummy

 

Take a fresh rodent, some toadstools and weeds

And an old owl and the young one she breeds

Mix in seven legs of an eight-legged beast

Then you are all set for a cannibal feast

 

Sit around the fire with the cup of brew

A fiend and a werewolf on each side of you

This cannibal **** is strange to behold

And the maddest story ever told

 

 

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How about Patty McCormack belting out the lyrics during the opening credits of The Mini-Skirt Mob?

 

“Disregard their good looks,

They’re just a bunch of dirty crooks,

 

With skirts showin’ plenty of knee,

 

 

That’s the Mini-Skirt Mob,

 

 

On another spree.”

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Is "I'll Take Manhattan" the same song as the Rogers and Hart song which was one of their first?("......the Bronx and Staten Island too")

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Yes, that's it. Actual title is "Manhattan." Originally written for the show Garrick Gaities (1925), and said to have been introduced in that show by Sterling Holloway. Garrick Gaities was not the first Rodgers & Hart show. Here's an early (rather odd) film version of the song.

 

 

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I think Benny Hill's version of Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head is the best version, but that's just me.

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>How about, "New York's a Lonely Town, When You're the Only Surfer Boy Around"?

 

LOL

 

Yeah, I suppose that one would've worked too.

 

(...yep, there's nothin' like a little lead singer falsetto thing goin' in order to convey the ol' California beach sound, is there?!...of course then again, Frankie Valli didn't do so bad on the east coast by usin' that whole falsetto thing to his advantage, huh!) ;)

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