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>Fred, I admit I didn't understand your comment about 'not missing anything' either.

 

I meant, when I stopped seeing most 1970s film, I missed nothing that I was interested in.

 

It went like this: My wife and I would try to find a new movie to go see, and we went, but most of the time we didn't like the movies. Just boring stuff, lots of cussin', bad lighting, too many zoom and hand-held shots (indicating a cheap budget).

 

I didn't "miss" any movies because we began to find a lot of old retro theaters and we began tracking down old films from the 1930s and 40s, so we gained a lot by switching over from the new trash movies to the older classic movies.

 

During the past 30-40 years, I've had a chance to take a peek at many of the 1970s movies that I chose not to see in the 1970s, and I've seen that I didn't miss anything. Out of the whole decade, there might have been one or two movies I finally watched on TV and I liked, but I can't think of their titles right now.

 

I saw so much junk at the beginning of the decade, and I just stopped going to new movies. We had 4 or 5 or more retro theaters, a couple of university theaters, plus the new WTBS on the new cable. Plus I got to see one of the early rare preview showing of Coppola's restoration of Napoleon (1927) in the mid 1970s. Coppola was there. His office was in San Francisco at that time. I was part of the preview audience.

 

I saw a complete or nearly complete WC Fields collection, Mae West, and Buster Keaton. Nearly ALL of their films. 35 mm, high quality prints, on the big screen. Far more of their films than TCM now airs.

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>or with any adult content those movie would have.

 

Every film we see on TCM has "adult" content.

 

Cursing does not make anyone an "adult".

 

I don't know how the adults talk where you live, but no one where I live curses in public. I had to break myself of the habit when I moved here about 15 years ago.

 

They might do it in their own homes or at work on the oil rigs and in the mines with the other men, but just about the only cursing I've heard where I live now came from me, and I had to train myself to stop doing it. That is the "adult" thing to do.

 

The cursing I hear in movies of the 1970s is the same stupid juvenile stuff I used to hear in the boy's gym class in high school, more than 50 years ago, among a bunch of immature stupid non-adult teen boys. When I hear it in a 70s movie, I feel like I'm back among those immature teens in the 1950s.

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What does 'in public' have to do with the use of curse words in movies? Hey, I agree one shouldn't use certain words in public; i.e. it is the polite thing to do, but I don't see how that is relevant to movies or what movies TCM decides to show.

 

But generally when there is cussing in films it is realistic. e.g. the scene is showing working men talking, people talking at their home, or teen talking to each other etc.... Thus using your own example, if a film maker wanted their film to be realistic and the film was about teens in the 50s there should be cussing. Thus those 70s movies you dislike so much are more realistic and true than, say a movie like Rebel WithOut A Cause.

 

As for my use of the term 'adult', it was just my lazy way to express the showing of nudity and cursing in a film as 'adult content'. It looks like you went out of your way to misunderstand my intent.

 

 

 

 

 

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>The term "adult" content is just a euphemism for cursing and doesn't use the term to apply to the usual use of the word "adult".

 

Treasure of the Sierra Madre, on last night, is about the most "adult" film I can think of, but it has no cursing in it at all. You are using the term "adult" incorrectly. Adult is supposed to mean "maturity, intelligence, etc".

 

I think my situation is that I often associate cursing in films of the 1970s with bad and poorly made films.

 

This might be difficult to explain to you young whippersnappers, especially all of you who never were a documentary cameraman like I was, and those of you who did not start watching classic films in theaters as early as 1947-48 like I did.

 

I lived through and watched the films of the entire era of the gradual degradation of Hollywood movies. It began around the mid-1950s and reached a low peak in the 1970s.

 

The cursing is not just the words, it's the whole concept of adding curse words to a lousy script and lousy film, as some sort of "adding realism" to the movie.

 

Last night I watched DELIVERANCE on another channel, and the cursing didn't bother me. But that was one of the best films ever made, a very high quality classic film, with a brilliant script, great photography, and great acting, and I thought the cursing was ok. When the mountain men did it, it made them even more frightening. I didn't even notice it for half an hour or so. :)

 

But you guys seem to think that any film of the 1970s that has cursing in it, must be a "great and realistic" film, just because it has cursing in it. But, you are wrong. And it's quite ok for people to complain about such trash on these message boards. :)

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Fred, I don't think anyone here thinks a film is good, just because it uses foul language, I know that I don't. But, I don't think most of use here think a film is necessarily BAD, just because it includes foul language. Until your professed approval of *Deliverance*, it seemed, to me, at least, that you were of the opinion that ANY film using foul language was necessarily bad. I'm glad you cleared that up. BTW, I like *Deliverance* too, and most of director John Boorman's other films as well. *Emerald Forest* and *Excalibur* are particular favorites of mine.

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Well said Valentine. Yea, the use of profanity in a film doesn't make or break a movie. It is just one part of the movie.

 

As I said; sometime a movie is more realistic by using profanity. Of course the use of profanity can be overdone, but this is just a sign of poor screen writing or direction. Good film makers know how profanity in a film can increase the realism of a movie and thus it's artistic value.

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>Anyone that was trying to understand wouldn't need it explained to them twice.

 

I've been thinking the same thing. It's very simple. Some people don't hear it at home, at work, around town, and they don't want to hear it on television. That's why they pay extra for a classic channel like TCM.

 

There are plenty of other movie channels that have it 24/7 and you are welcome to them.

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If you took the time to read my posts you would see that I'm one that hopes TCM decides to stay mostly with studio era movies (mostly being at least 90% of the programming).

 

BUT if TCM is going to show post studio-era movies I want them to choose the movies they feel are the best ones. Period. I do NOT wish for TCM to NOT play a post studio era movie just becuase it has some nudity or profanity. The quality of the product has to be the top priority not trying to shield some people from specific content. (I have the same opinion when it comes to racist content in studio-era movies).

 

Note that TCM supplies the ratings. Those people that don't wish to view certain content need to do their homework to avoid that content. TCM also only shows movies with that type of content in the late hours.

 

 

 

 

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We agree that TCM has shown some 70's movies that are NOT classic to me (by a long shot).

 

But TCM didn't show those movies because they had profanity. For some reason the programmer felt they were classic movies.

 

Edited by: jamesjazzguitar on Jan 14, 2013 6:20 PM

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It would be most appropriate for TCM to show mostly '30s and '40s movies during weekday days (as they do now), and the best of post-1970 movies (which may have "adult" language) in the overnight hours. Prime time can be mostly '50s and '60s films, which tend to be better-known to the under-50 audience.

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I guess you don't know my stance on this. I was a fool to use the term 'classic' and only did because Fred and others likes to use this term. 'Classic' as it relates to movies has NO meaning to me. (classic in music has meaning since it relates to a genre).

 

I view TCM as a 'mostly studio era movie', and as you noted a lot of studio era movies are NOT 'classic' (if classic = good).

 

Also, post studio era movies can be very good. So I have no problem with TCM showing them. I just would like TCM to limit their viewing to around 10% of the programming (just my preference).

 

But yea, I do find it silly when I see people say that all the 30 - 50 movies were great and that after this nothing good was done. There are good movies from every era. BUT as a brand I hope TCM sticks to studio era movies, showing even the not so good ones.

 

Edited by: jamesjazzguitar on Jan 15, 2013 11:42 AM

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>I do find it silly when I see people say that all the 30 - 50 movies were great and that after this nothing good was done.

 

I?ve never heard anyone here say that. But I have heard them say that they would rather see 1930s and 40s movies rather than 1960s and 70s movies, and also I?ve heard them say that even a bad 1930s-40s movie is better than an average 60s-70s movie.

 

And I?ve also heard them say that they would rather a 30-40s (rather than 60s-70s) movie be playing in the background, and if it's not a great film they just turn the sound down a little while they are on their computers. And everyone agrees that there were a few classics made in the 1960s and 70s, such as DELIVERANCE and APOCALYPSE NOW.

 

In fact, in different threads I?ve alerted people to those two movies, and I didn?t complain about the profanity in them. In a great film, the profanity isn?t as noticeable or objectionable. But in a lousy turkey film, it is unbearable. :)

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I find that the films of the 1970's can absolutly be considerd "Classic" and most of them are just a product of the decade itself. Especially movie from the traumatic late 60's to post Vietnam, and Post Watergate. This can be seen in other art forms at the time as well. "The Last Detail" for me was interesting because director Hal Ashby and screenwriter Robert Towne had substituted profanity for violence (not that it does not get violence at all). I am not a fan of profanity but I can ignore that for plot, or if there is a reason to have it there. I find movies like "The Expendables" and its sequel to have violence glorified and be pointless for half a dozen aging action stars to jump start their career more offensive. I have no problems with TCM showing films late night with profanity. There are many other films from the 70's worth showing such as ......"The Last Picture Show", "Coming Home", "Harold and Maude", "Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore", "The French Connection", "Taxi Driver", "They Shoot Horses Don't They?", just to name a few.

 

 

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What I enjoy the most about "classic" films, no matter what era they come from, it the excellent dialog written.. Profanity or nudity in the pre-code era is a sight to behold. But the blatant obscenity of films from the 70's on, well, I think that gratuitous violence, nudity & profanity take over the whole tone of some movies, & leave a bad taste in the mouth. As for movies that have sex & mature subjects from the late 30's through the 50's & into the 60's, writers getting their points across had to be especially clever, crafty & wonderfully creative with the lines. AND THEY WERE. Take the subject matter in "The Women"-the one with Joan Crawford as the hussy store clerk. A GREAT example of getting her point across after being ousted by the group" There's a name for women like you, but it isn't used in polite society-outside a KENNEL."-was a CLASSIC. Another, in a fitting room was "Whenever your husband dosen't like what I'm wearing-I take it off!" If you really listen to all of the greats speaking in code back then, it really shows the brilliance & caliber of writers then. Now, writers depend entirely TOO MUCH on visual assault by viloence or open sex & of course unrelenting foul language to get the point across. And THAT to me, is boring. One of my favourite actors, much under-rated I might add, is Eric Roberts. Julia's brother, yes, but I hate that reference, as much as his daughter Emma being always listed in articles as "Julia's niece"...he is a great actor in his own right. See the movie Star 80 & you'll see what I mean, but I digress. He has done a lot of B movies-way below his talent level, but the worst line I EVER heard in one of them was when he encountered a bad guy with a gun: "Kick that gun over here before I knock your kneecaps off & use 'em as hockeypucks!" I was embarrassed for him having to SAY such a stupid line while laughing at the stupidity of it at the same time. A bigger named star with more clout most likely would have never uttered those words. And a writer with any pride in his literary talents would have never written them. Yet SOMEHOW-they got into a movie. And STAYED there to humiliate the poor actor who had to say them. I DO yearn for the old days. And young people should be MADE to watch & listen to the great stories of those days to be an example of brilliant, clever writing. The way that people speak to each other now is so maimed by incorrectness because it was declared impolite to correct in this "feel good about yourself no matter WHAT era" & by texting & email limitations, has become the downfall of semantics, conversation & sentence composition. Well, that's my rant on the state of movies now...hope I didn't go TOO off topic! ;)

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*"Well, that's my rant on the state of movies now...hope I didn't go TOO off topic!"*

 

Not at all. And a nice rant it was. I bet most members here would agree with you - though they may be more appreciative of the "silly" dialogue in that "guilty pleasure" way classic film fans have.

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