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krazykatclassics

Newbie here! and early technicolor questions

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Hello everyone, my name is krazykatclassics and I wanted to introduce myself to all the classic movie fans and to enjoy my stay here.My real name is Nelson I just turned 38 yrs old and I'm currently studying to become a film researcher collect classic films and I love the old classic movies from Hollywood's "golden years.

 

I wanted to direct a question for tcmprogrammer and or anyone else that can answer this for me.

 

I am such a fan of the early sound techincolor features from the late 20s and early 30s and there is a couple of two strip technicolor features that I would love to see.

 

1.Has the 1930 Warner Bros. technicolor musical "Under A Texas Moon" ever aired on TCM?I have been requesting this film for a few years and with no such luck.I know that the UCLA FILM AND TELEVISON ARCHIVE has restored the film to all it's natural glory and will this film be shown in the future?

 

and for my final question...

 

2.I have seen the classic Al Jolson 1930 feature "Mammy" a couple of years ago and I know that the color scenes were missing.Now that UCLA has found(and preserved) the lost technicolor sequences, will we see the original verison the next time this film airs on TCM?

 

Thanks!

 

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That question is way beyond me sorry, but I would like to welcome you to the boards anyways and I hope you get your answer. : )

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Why thanks everyone and I hope that I'll have a great time here and getting to make new friends.

 

But as for my questions, this looks like a job for tcm programmer...LOL

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In answer to your question about why TCM hasn't aired "Under a Texas Moon" and "Mammy":

 

The single most common reason films don't get broadcast are copyright issues. This is a really sticky subject, with more twists than a bad "pot-boiler," but basically, the studio or the company that owns the originating studio maintains the rights to their films for "the life of the artist + 70 years." The UCLA Film & TV Archives has a terrific collection, but it's exactly that: a collection. They do not hold the rights to the items in their collection, and do not have permission to allow a third party (TCM) to broadcast their restored versions of a film. It is the same as the ownership of a fine book: you can take very good care of it, you can let other people read it, but you legally can't make copies of it.

 

Fortunately, the people at the UCLA Film Archives are very helpful, and you can make arrangements to view the films for research purposes. However, it does mean you have to make a trip out to Los Angeles.

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