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Oh, that face, that fabulous face II - Post 1950's. Whose is it?


Kid Dabb
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Yeah Hibi, IN FACT I'm kind of surprised what with all these so-called "Reality Shows" on TV today that "spotlight" the kookiest and in many cases the most forlorn people in our society, that some "enterprising" TV exec hasn't resurrected the concept of this program by now!

 

(...I mean, isn't that "Wipeout" thing just an updated "Beat the Clock", and isn't "American Idol" and "America's Got Talent" just an updated "Ted Mack's Original Amateur Hour"???)

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> {quote:title=Dargo2 wrote:}{quote}

> and isn't "American Idol" and "America's Got Talent" just an updated "Ted Mack's Original Amateur Hour"???

 

No, because you don't have a guy like Mack hawking Geritol, and claiming it has "twice the iron in a pound of calf's liver."

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LOL. It could have a whole new meaning if they interpreted "Queen" another way.......I remember the Applause meter. Whoever got the highest applause on the meter, won! They always cried at the end......Ah, 50s tv....The BEST! (LOL)

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Well, Dargo got him. "Queen For a Day" started as a radio show in the forties before moving to television. The winner was usually the one who gave the biggest sob story. I think I remember that the winner usually got a mink cost, in addition to the things that she really needed. Here's what Wikipedia says about the show.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The show opened with host [Jack Bailey|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Bailey_(actor)|Jack Bailey (actor)] asking the audience—mostly women—"Would YOU like to be Queen for a day?" After this, the contestants were introduced and interviewed, one at a time, with commercials and fashion commentary interspersed between each contestant.^[[3]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_for_a_Day#cite_note-tv-3]^

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using the classic [applause meter|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Applause_meter|Applause meter], as did many game and hit-parade style shows of the time, Queen for a Day had its own special twist: each contestant had to talk publicly about the recent financial and emotional hard times she had been through. The applause meter had also been used on earlier series, including [Fred Allen|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Allen|Fred Allen]'s [Judge for Yourself|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judge_for_Yourself|Judge for Yourself], a variety and game show which aired on NBC from 1953-1954.^[[4]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_for_a_Day#cite_note-4]^

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bailey began each interview gently, asking the contestant first about her life and family, and maintaining a positive and upbeat response no matter what she told him. For instance, when a woman said she had a crippled child, he would ask if her second child was "Okay." On learning that the second child was not crippled, he might say, "Well, that's good, you have one healthy child."

 

 

 

 

 

 

The interview would climax with Bailey asking the contestant what she needed most and why she wanted to win the title of Queen for a Day. Often the request was for medical care or therapeutic equipment to help a chronically ill child, but sometimes it was as simple as the need for a hearing aid, a new washing machine, or a refrigerator. Many women broke down sobbing as they described their plights, and Bailey was always quick to comfort them and offer a clean white handkerchief to dry their eyes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The harsher the circumstances under which the contestant labored, the likelier the studio audience was to ring the applause meter's highest level. The winner, to the musical accompaniment of "[Pomp and Circumstance|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomp_and_Circumstance|Pomp and Circumstance]", would be draped in a sable-trimmed red velvet robe, given a glittering jeweled crown to wear, placed on a velvet-upholstered throne, and handed a dozen long-stemmed roses to hold as she wept, often uncontrollably, while her list of prizes was announced.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The prizes, many of which were donated by sponsoring companies, began with the necessary help the woman had requested, but built from there. They might include a variety of extras, such as a vacation trip, a night on the town with her husband, silver-plated flatware, an array of kitchen appliances, or a selection of fashion clothing. The losing contestants were each given smaller prizes; no one went away from the show without a meaningful gift.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bailey's trademark sign-off was "This is Jack Bailey, wishing we could make every woman a queen, for every single day!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Television writer [Mark Evanier|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Evanier|Mark Evanier] has dubbed it "one of the most ghastly shows ever produced" and further stated it was "tasteless, demeaning to women, demeaning to anyone who watched it, cheap, insulting and utterly degrading to the human spirit."^[[5]|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_for_a_Day#cite_note-5]

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LOL! You have a good memory. I forgot the Pomp and Circumstance part. (hey, I was only a kid). I do remember the crown, robe, roses etc. Yeah, they would always cry at the end. The person with the biggest sob story won. I wish there was a way to watch that show again. I'm sure it's hilarious now. How long was that show on tv? Does anyone know???Were they picked beforehand or were they members of the audience like Let's Make A Deal? I cant remember......

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>I wish there was a way to watch that show again.

 

Okay Hibi. If you promise not to cry too much ;) , here ya go!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7HdYjrQRAg

 

(...interesting thing here though is that while the uploader of this YouTube video claims it was broadcast in 1956, there's a part in it where Jack says the Queen for a Day will get her own private screening of "Spartacus", which as we know wasn't released until 1960)

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The first aisle I walked down with my future ex-wife was at high school graduation, to the strains of "Pomp and Circumstance"( as did millions of others around the country).

 

 

When the proccession started, and the music began, my future ex said, "Hey! Hear that music? We're gonna get NEW APPLIANCES!"

 

 

I never said she didn't have a sense of humor...

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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Ye, Ray got Art Baker. "You Asked Fot It" was a show where viewers sent in requests for things they would like to see on TV, such as a man wrestling an anaconda, or steel workers on girders bulding a skyscraper. The show ran for almost ten years. Now, who is this next guy?

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTkTrPBGofbFOud-__Krydimages?q=tbn:ANd9GcQILYho6-SgArX7Pq0XAb0

 

He was an actor and comedian who will always be associated with a TV show.

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> {quote:title=lavenderblue19 wrote:}{quote}Just back on the bds and saw this one. LOL- remember when he played the sleazy, womanizing negligee salesman on I Love Lucy. Funny guy

 

Yes, he played Eddie, and then Ricky and Fred encountered their wives dressed in negligees in Eddie's apartment.

 

Ricky: "Lucy, you, here, dressed like that ... you must be out of your mind!"

Fred: "Ethel, you here, dressed like that ... HE must be out of his mind!"

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Hal March was a very nice man. I wrote him a fan letter once and he wrote back, apologizing for not having written sooner! A long, friendly letter, very knowledgeable and entertaining. I felt awful when he died. I believe he was pretty young when he went.

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