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ayresorchids

Black and white phobia

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Sorry folks, just found that answer to my own question. For all who are interested there are just a few available on Ebay. They are smaller than I pictured only about 6"tall by 4" wide with a star in the middle, more stars = more members in the service. Red was the perimeter color, blue on the star with a white background. Also there is one with a blue star covered by silver leaving the blue edge, maybe a decorated son. I also found out that there are gold stars for members who died.

thanks for listening to me ramble.

jerry

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Yes, I've thought of doing just that - turning the color down, but what a pain going thru menus to do it. :-) (Someone else mentioned the lack of knobs on tv's these days -- was much easier to do then!) Someone else mentioned something about the shadows, angles & lighting, etc. I know that not everything would be "just right" viewing a color-drained movie but for someone like me (where color is sometimes more a distraction) it would probably alright. LOL, maybe I have ADHD eyes or something! I actually miss my old non-cable ready b&w set from a billion years ago.

 

Not exactly the same but this is reminding me of my sister who usually watches tv with the sound turned completely off. LOL, what a pair we make!

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Hi logical1. Glad you found your answer on the banners. I recall seeing newer ones in the aftermath of 9/11 being sold in (that store that's on every corner in the country). I had wondered how true to the originals they were but from your description of the ones you found on Ebay the newer ones are much bigger.

 

Do you know the ones I'm referring to?

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nsallieharding, I agree with your comments about angles and such. The first thing that came to mind for me was Citizen Kane. (Hoping to catch that next week!)

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itsart2too,

In this age of vhs,laserdiscs and dvd's sometime people get the idea that a restored dvd was the way the film looked when it was originally shown. In most cases this is not so. Many times we would see a first run film with scratches,pops in the sound track, etc. Studios could be identified by their photography and sounds.Universal for instance had sparkling photography[both b/w and color]. A person could identify Columbia and Republic by their music and razor sharp photography. Booming heavy music introduced Warners and so on.Not so today..

"Beautiful black and white" need not be a cliche.But in this age it can always be a subject for debate.

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Getting rid of color on the TV is good also to eradicate the distraction of those silent films that change tints from scene to scene.

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I was curious about this, so I asked my "in-house expert" (my husband, who is a photographer and pretty knowledgeable on the subject of B&W film images). According to him, there is a slight, but noticeable difference when an old B&W film such as Swing Time is digitized prior to being aired on TCM. The contrast levels change slightly, making the images appear slightly sharper. Additionally, all the scratches and dust are removed; that in itself gives the film a better look. However, the photography in many of these classic movies really is that sharp and that good. Many of the best classic movies were shot with very fine equipment and lenses, the cameramen knew their business, and the distortion of the anamorphic lens was in the future.

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I've encountered this before, and I just don't understand it. Like a lot of you, I actually prefer black & white. The world in a film in b&w seems unreal, like it's from a different world. Thus a well-photographed film is inherently fascinating and beautiful, even when the movie isn't very good. I don't know what people who dislike b&w films see when they look at them. It's not what I see.

 

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I don't find it "moronic" at all. The conversation about colorization has moved well past the stage where one would discuss whether it is ethically correct or not. It is not "ethically" correct; I think everyone in the business understands that now - there was confusion about this point say thirty years ago when b/w cartoons were sent over to Korea and refilmed in color versions which essentially "destroy" the original images.

 

But color is here to stay. When I was coming up, b/w TV sets were still common in American homes, and you grew used to seeing both naturally. Not anymore, as there are whole generations of people who can't understand why anyone would bother to watch something in b/w. My daughter, who is eleven, is not one of them, as she has been exposed to both formats her whole life. She's a huge fan of Felix the Cat and Betty Boop and would certainly never would stand for the poor colorization that has been done on some of Betty's titles.

 

The idea of offering the option of colorized vs. b/w in a single package is an intelligent solution to a commercial problem - how does one market a b/w film to someone who simply won't watch it because it is "inferior?" You and I know it isn't, but we can't take the time to re-educate entire generations of people whose central cultural exposure has been through color TV and movies all their lives. The color is offered alongside the original, so that the original is still part of the package. As long as the original doesn't disappear, that's a reasonable way to go about it. In the case of a few Looney Tunes sent over to Korea for colorization in the 1960s, the b/w version somehow got away from us, at least in 35mm, and the colorized versions are the only ones that can be shown on TV. That is by far the worst case scenerio.

 

Colorization can also be used to restore color to color films that only survive in b/w - not nearly enough work of this kind has been done so far. Digital colorization in 2005 is a HUGE improvement over the invasive techniques of the stencils used on the remade Looney Tunes of the 1960s and has even improved over where it was when introduced in the 1980s. So it's not all bad.

 

spadeneal

 

 

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I am in complete agreement with you on the colorization issue, therealfuster, but allow me to observe that, if the Lucille Ball film were perchance one she made in the early or mid 1930s, blonde would be the correct color for her hair.

 

 

> I ever saw was "Topper".

>

> They had Billie Burke's hair color all wrong!

>

> Kind of like making Lucy a blonde on film. Just not

> right.

>

> If one colorizes, at least know what color the star's

> hair and eyes really were.

>

 

 

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