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Colleen Moore

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Is there anybody here who happens to be a fan of 1920s screen siren and who was considered to be the first "flapper" of Hollywood, Colleen Moore?

 

I do know that some of her films survive and wouldn't be nice if TCM could air some of them during their Silent Sunday Nights telecasts?

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Colleen Moore is great, but my flapper of choice will always be Clara Bow! I'd much rather see her films played on TCM. Clara's films are more easily accessible than Colleen's so I see your point in wanting to see her films on TCM.

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It's true, Colleen Moore was a huge star during the 1920's, at Paramount and I have seen very few of her movies.To my knowledge, only the World War I drama LILAC TIME (1928) (with Gary Cooper) has been aired by TCM among Colleen Moore's feature films. Unfortunately, that was clear back in 1996. Some three years before I first saw TCM. I would sure love to see them run this picture again in the near future!

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Well considering Moore's films(that survives)are totally worth re-discovery in today's modern era and I didn't even know that TCM aired Lilac Time years ago.It does surprise me that that film was released by Paramount considering she was under contract with First National at the time, but she along with Clara Bow and Louise Brooks would be the three top flappers that defined the roaring twenties.

 

I can honestly say, that i've never seen any(which is a shame)of Moore's features, but I have tons of research on her and her films would give anything to see her work.But I do have some great news about Moore, that around early 2003, two of Moore's 1929 features were discovered in a Eurpoean film archive and the titles were "SYNTHETIC SIN" and Moore last silent film, "WHY BE GOOD".

 

Now both films have all of their original sound on discs and the Viatphone project started restoration work on both features a couple of years ago.Now what is interesting of note, that by the time both of Colleen's two featuers were released, First National merged with Warner Brothers and was billed under a Vitaphone/First National releases.

 

This should mean that TCM and Time Warner would be the owners of the long lost re-discovered films and TCM should check into this and bring these two titles to their channel.

 

 

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Oops! I do beg your pardon, you may well be correct about First National being the distributor? I?ll check up on it again. If TCM does have the rights to LILAC TIME, I do hope they bring it out of the woodwork sometime soon! I?m in my latter Thirties and I?ve waited to see this film since the late 70's, when I was just a little tyke! I'm elated to learn about the other recently discovered Colleen Moore features as well! That?s great news!

 

Some of the really big silent?s that have yet to air on TCM from what I understand, are among others WHAT PRICE GLORY? (Fox, 1926), SEVENTH HEAVEN (Fox, 1926), SUNRISE(Fox,1927), WINGS (Paramount, 1927) and THE DOCK'S OF NEW YORK (Paramount,1928).

 

I sincerely hope a full restoration of WHAT PRICE GLORY? is in the works, because the prints I have seen look truly dismal! That?s pretty upsetting! SEVENTH HEAVEN starring Janet Gaynor and Charrles Farral is probably the most famous silent film that I have never seen!

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The only one of her movies I have seen is Lilac Time. Have seen some of her silents listed on ebay for sale on VHS. Not sure what condition.

 

If your interested in her and get a chance there are copies of her autobiography out there.

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All of you simply must read Moore's terrific memoirs, "Silent Star." It came out in l968 and made it to the best-sellers list. I was lucky enough to find a copy at a second-hand bookstore. Moore describes how her "flapper" image evolved into a creature who took the movie world by storm in l923. Until then, she had been a dull, colorless film performer. But she began noticing the college girls that her brother was dating at the time--girls who were beginning to cut their hair short, wear shockingly short dresses, drink hootch from flasks, smoked like fiends and used heavy make-up. At the same time, the number one best-selling novel was 'Flaming Youth.' Moore fought to star in the film adaptation and the movie was a sensation in l923, not only here but even in Russia. Moore instantly became the role model for millions of jazz babies who tried to copy her. In stills from the movie, Moore is shown in typical Jazz Age flapper mode--a black short skirt, dark stockings, high heel shoes and a page-boy haircut. She instantly zoomed to become Hollywood's highest paid actress--next to Mary Pickford--and was making $12,500 a week--with no taxes and in l920s dollars. The great tragedy of Moore and her silent cohorts are that her movies are never seen or even televised. I brought one of her popular features, "Orchids and Ermine" from Grapevine Studio and she looked like what you would think of as a Jazz Age flapper. Her most famous movie, "Flaming Youth", has vanished. Only a seven minute fragment of it remains in the Library of Congress. One contemporary critic wrote of one stunning sequence in "Flaming Youth" that shocked everyone: Moore and her party buddies go to an all-night party, and afterwards they all plunge fully-clothed into a pool or reservoir to cool off." They do this over and over, while whooping and laughing. The critic said Moore and her co-actors were so spontaneous and natural it was like watching feisty, dynamic young animals shaking off the last tatters of the Victorian age. I watched Moore's two talkies and it's no wonder they finished off her career. In "Power and the Glory" her role was colorless and small although her voice was okay. But it was the povery-row production of "The Scarlet Letter" that was truly painful to watch. It was like the director did everything he could to make Moore look pained and ugly. The sets and the costumes and the cast were grade-Z. Her voice sounded unusually nasal. It'd be great if TCM could telecast any of Moore's silents, just as it would be fantastic if someone could discover some of the work by Mae Murray and the Talmadge Sisters--especially Constance, who supposedly inspired Anita Loos classic, "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." The sugar daddies of the Roaring twenties, however, definitely appeared to have preferred both blondes and dark-heads because both Constance and Coleen made a habit of marrying zillionaires.

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of "beestung lips" fame, must have been a forerunner of the silicone injected lip fetishists now, Paty.

 

My grandmother was a fan of both Colleen and Mae, and is my source for all flapper info. According to her, when Fitzgerald's Bernice cropped her hair, she did so also. She says she prefers Louise Brooks though as her fave of the flapper clique, and still owns some copies of magazines with the quintessential John Held drawings of the Roaring Twenties.

 

Due to grandma helping guide me movie wise, I have seen some Colleen Moore vehicles in the past, and I know she was a big star for quite a while. Then as things will happen, some people become passe in the public's eye, just like Little Mary became associated with a time gone by, which was much more sentimental, and replaced by girls traipsing around in flapping galoshes, with cloche headwear. Very few trendy types escape this eventuality, unless it is someone like Brooks who fled to Europe to be reappraised by the intelligentsia of filmdom.

 

Imagine my surprise, while watching a dvd recently of the Carroll Baker flick, "Baba Yaga" to see a comic book character as conceived by **** Crepax, who was based on Brooks and her stylish cropped hairdo.

 

Yes, the flapper look is revived again and again, and I for one would really love to see "Flaming Youth" with Colleen Moore, and I hope TCm shows it sometime.

 

Clara Bow, in "CMS" though, is the original wild child.

At least that's what they say the USC football team once thought...but I'm naming no names.

 

She could give Drew Barrymore lessons.

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