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casablancalover2

Your BALLOT for the Oscar

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It occurs to me, especially at Academy Awards time, there is second guessing over the who should have won.

 

Well, let me make it easier for you. Below, is your ballot from the

h3. Academy choices for 1940:

 

*ACTOR*

Charles Chaplin -- The Great Dictator {"Hynkel, Dictator of Tomania"}

Henry Fonda -- The Grapes of Wrath {"Tom Joad"}

Raymond Massey -- Abe Lincoln in Illinois {"Abraham Lincoln"}

Laurence Olivier -- Rebecca {"Maxim de Winter"}

James Stewart -- The Philadelphia Story {"Mike Connor"} **

 

*ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE*

Albert Basserman -- Foreign Correspondent {"Van Meer"}

Walter Brennan -- The Westerner {"Judge Roy Bean"} **

William Gargan -- They Knew What They Wanted {"Joe, the Foreman"}

Jack Oakie -- The Great Dictator {"Napaloni, Dictator of Bacteria"}

James Stephenson -- The Letter {"Howard Joyce"}

 

*ACTRESS*

Bette Davis -- The Letter {"Leslie Crosbie"}

Joan Fontaine -- Rebecca {"Mrs. de Winter"}

Katharine Hepburn -- The Philadelphia Story {"Tracy Lord"}

Ginger Rogers -- Kitty Foyle {"Kitty Foyle"} **

Martha Scott -- Our Town {"Emily Webb"}

 

*ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE*

Judith Anderson -- Rebecca {"Mrs. Danvers"}

Jane Darwell -- The Grapes of Wrath {"Ma Joad"} **

Ruth Hussey -- The Philadelphia Story {"Liz Imbrie"}

Barbara O'Neil -- All This, and Heaven Too {"Duchesse de Praslin"}

Marjorie Rambeau -- Primrose Path {"Mamie Adams"}

 

*ART DIRECTION (Black-and-White)*

Arise, My Love -- Hans Dreier, Robert Usher

Arizona -- Lionel Banks, Robert Peterson

The Boys from Syracuse -- John Otterson

The Dark Command -- John Victor Mackay

Foreign Correspondent -- Alexander Golitzen

Lillian Russell -- Richard Day, Joseph C. Wright

My Favorite Wife -- Van Nest Polglase, Mark-Lee Kirk

My Son, My Son! -- John DuCasse Schulze

Our Town -- Lewis J. Rachmil

Pride and Prejudice -- Cedric Gibbons, Paul Groesse **

Rebecca -- Lyle Wheeler

The Sea Hawk -- Anton Grot

The Westerner -- James Basevi

 

*ART DIRECTION (Color)*

Bitter Sweet -- Cedric Gibbons, John S. Detlie

Down Argentine Way -- Richard Day, Joseph C. Wright

North West Mounted Police -- Hans Dreier, Roland Anderson

The Thief of Bagdad -- Vincent Korda **

 

*CINEMATOGRAPHY (Black-and-White)*

Abe Lincoln in Illinois -- James Wong Howe

All This, and Heaven Too -- Ernest Haller

Arise, My Love -- Charles B. Lang, Jr.

Boom Town -- Harold Rosson

Foreign Correspondent -- Rudolph Mat?

The Letter -- Gaetano (Tony) Gaudio

The Long Voyage Home -- Gregg Toland

Rebecca -- George Barnes **

Spring Parade -- Joseph Valentine

Waterloo Bridge -- Joseph Ruttenberg

 

*CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color)*

Bitter Sweet -- Oliver T. Marsh, Allen Davey

The Blue Bird -- Arthur Miller, Ray Rennahan

Down Argentine Way -- Leon Shamroy, Ray Rennahan

North West Mounted Police -- Victor Milner, W. Howard Greene

Northwest Passage -- Sidney Wagner, William V. Skall

The Thief of Bagdad -- Georges P?rinal **

 

*DIRECTING*

The Grapes of Wrath -- John Ford **

Kitty Foyle -- Sam Wood

The Letter -- William Wyler

The Philadelphia Story -- George Cukor

Rebecca -- Alfred Hitchcock

 

*FILM EDITING*

The Grapes of Wrath -- Robert Simpson

The Letter -- Warren Low

The Long Voyage Home -- Sherman Todd

North West Mounted Police -- Anne Bauchens **

Rebecca -- Hal C. Kern

 

*MUSIC (Original Score)*

Arizona -- Victor Young

The Dark Command -- Victor Young

The Fight for Life -- Louis Gruenberg

The Great Dictator -- Meredith Willson

The House of the Seven Gables -- Frank Skinner

The Howards of Virginia -- Richard Hageman

The Letter -- Max Steiner

The Long Voyage Home -- Richard Hageman

The Mark of Zorro -- Alfred Newman

My Favorite Wife -- Roy Webb

North West Mounted Police -- Victor Young

One Million B.C. -- Werner Heymann

Our Town -- Aaron Copland

Pinocchio -- Leigh Harline, Paul J. Smith, Ned Washington **

Rebecca -- Franz Waxman

The Thief of Bagdad -- Miklos Rozsa

Waterloo Bridge -- Herbert Stothart

 

*MUSIC (Scoring)*

Arise, My Love -- Victor Young

Hit Parade of 1941 -- Cy Feuer

Irene -- Anthony Collins

Our Town -- Aaron Copland

The Sea Hawk -- Erich Wolfgang Korngold

Second Chorus -- Artie Shaw

Spring Parade -- Charles Previn

Strike Up the Band -- Roger Edens, Georgie Stoll

Tin Pan Alley -- Alfred Newman **

 

*MUSIC (Song)*

"Down Argentina Way" from Down Argentine Way -- Music by Harry Warren; Lyrics by Mack Gordon

"I'd Know You Anywhere" from You'll Find Out -- Music by Jimmy McHugh; Lyrics by Johnny Mercer

"It's A Blue World" from Music in My Heart -- Music and Lyrics by Chet Forrest and Bob Wright

"Love Of My Life" from Second Chorus -- Music by Artie Shaw; Lyrics by Johnny Mercer

"Only Forever" from Rhythm on the River -- Music by James Monaco; Lyrics by John Burke

"Our Love Affair" from Strike Up the Band -- Music and Lyrics by Roger Edens and Arthur Freed

"Waltzing In The Clouds" from Spring Parade -- Music by Robert Stolz; Lyrics by Gus Kahn

"When You Wish Upon A Star" from Pinocchio -- Music by Leigh Harline; Lyrics by Ned Washington **

"Who Am I?" from Hit Parade of 1941 -- Music by Jule Styne; Lyrics by Walter Bullock

 

*SHORT SUBJECT (Cartoon)*

The Milky Way -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer **

Puss Gets the Boot -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

A Wild Hare -- Leon Schlesinger, Producer

 

*SHORT SUBJECT (One-reel)*

London Can Take It -- Warner Bros.

More about Nostradamus -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Quicker 'N a Wink -- Pete Smith, Producer **

Siege -- RKO Radio

 

*SHORT SUBJECT (Two-reel)*

Eyes of the Navy -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Service with the Colors -- Warner Bros.

Teddy, the Rough Rider -- Warner Bros. **

 

*SOUND RECORDING*

Behind the News -- Republic Studio Sound Department, Charles L. Lootens, Sound Director

Captain Caution -- Hal Roach Studio Sound Department, Elmer A. Raguse, Sound Director

The Grapes of Wrath -- 20th Century-Fox Studio Sound Department, E. H. Hansen, Sound Director

The Howards of Virginia -- General Service Sound Department, Jack Whitney, Sound Director

Kitty Foyle -- RKO Radio Studio Sound Department, John Aalberg, Sound Director

North West Mounted Police -- Paramount Studio Sound Department, Loren L. Ryder, Sound Director

Our Town -- Samuel Goldwyn Studio Sound Department, Thomas T. Moulton, Sound Director

The Sea Hawk -- Warner Bros. Studio Sound Department, Nathan Levinson, Sound Director

Spring Parade -- Universal Studio Sound Department, Bernard B. Brown, Sound Director

Strike Up the Band -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio Sound Department, Douglas Shearer, Sound Director **

Too Many Husbands -- Columbia Studio Sound Department, John Livadary, Sound Director

 

*SPECIAL EFFECTS*

The Blue Bird -- Photographic Effects by Fred Sersen; Sound Effects by E. H. Hansen

Boom Town -- Photographic Effects by A. Arnold Gillespie; Sound Effects by Douglas Shearer

The Boys from Syracuse -- Photographic Effects by John P. Fulton; Sound Effects by Bernard B. Brown, Joseph Lapis

Dr. Cyclops -- Photographic Effects by Gordon Jennings, Farciot Edouart

Foreign Correspondent -- Photographic Effects by Paul Eagler; Sound Effects by Thomas T. Moulton

The Invisible Man Returns -- Photographic Effects by John P. Fulton; Sound Effects by Bernard B. Brown, William Hedgecock

The Long Voyage Home -- Photographic Effects by R. T. Layton, R. O. Binger; Sound Effects by Thomas T. Moulton

One Million B.C. -- Photographic Effects by Roy Seawright; Sound Effects by Elmer Raguse

Rebecca -- Photographic Effects by Jack Cosgrove; Sound Effects by Arthur Johns

The Sea Hawk -- Photographic Effects by Byron Haskin; Sound Effects by Nathan Levinson

Swiss Family Robinson -- Photographic Effects by Vernon L. Walker; Sound Effects by John O. Aalberg

The Thief of Bagdad -- Photographic Effects by Lawrence Butler; Sound Effects by Jack Whitney **

Typhoon -- Photographic Effects by Farciot Edouart, Gordon Jennings; Sound Effects by Loren Ryder

Women in War -- Photographic Effects by Howard J. Lydecker, William Bradford, Ellis J. Thackery; Sound Effects by Herbert Norsch

 

*WRITING (Original Screenplay)*

Angels over Broadway -- Ben Hecht

Dr. Ehrlich's Magic Bullet -- John Huston, Heinz Herald, Norman Burnside

Foreign Correspondent -- Charles Bennett, Joan Harrison

The Great Dictator -- Charles Chaplin **

The Great McGinty -- Preston Sturges

 

*WRITING (Original Story)*

Arise, My Love -- Benjamin Glazer, John S. Toldy **

Comrade X -- Walter Reisch

Edison, the Man -- Dore Schary, Hugo Butler

My Favorite Wife -- Bella Spewack, Samuel Spewack, Leo McCarey

The Westerner -- Stuart N. Lake

 

*WRITING (Screenplay)*

The Grapes of Wrath -- Nunnally Johnson

Kitty Foyle -- Dalton Trumbo

The Long Voyage Home -- Dudley Nichols

The Philadelphia Story -- Donald Ogden Stewart **

Rebecca -- Robert E. Sherwood, Joan Harrison

 

*OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION* (BEST MOVIE)

All This, and Heaven Too -- Warner Bros.

Foreign Correspondent -- Walter Wanger (production company)

The Grapes of Wrath -- 20th Century-Fox

The Great Dictator -- Charles Chaplin Productions

Kitty Foyle -- RKO Radio

The Letter -- Warner Bros.

The Long Voyage Home -- Argosy-Wanger

Our Town -- Sol Lesser (production company)

The Philadelphia Story -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Rebecca -- Selznick International Pictures **

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Fun thread idea, cbl. I'm not very good at this sort of thing, I always have trouble choosing THE "best" of any list.

 

Also, I haven't seen some of the films in the nominations -in almost all categories there seems to be at least one picture I have not as yet seen.

 

As an example of the difficulty I have with deciding what is "best", I've copied just the "Best Picture" nominations from your post.

Interesting how they called it "Outstanding Production" back then.

 

 

*OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION* (BEST MOVIE)

 

 

All This, and Heaven Too -- Warner Bros.

Foreign Correspondent -- Walter Wanger (production company)

The Grapes of Wrath -- 20th Century-Fox

The Great Dictator -- Charles Chaplin Productions

Kitty Foyle -- RKO Radio

The Letter -- Warner Bros.

The Long Voyage Home -- Argosy-Wanger

Our Town -- Sol Lesser (production company)

The Philadelphia Story -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Rebecca -- Selznick International Pictures **

 

 

So, right there, I have a problem. There are three films from that list I have not seen: *All This and Heaven Too*, *The Long Voyage Home* and *Our Town*.

What is unusual (for me, anyway) is that of the 7 remaining, I like all of them and think all of them are good movies in their own way. They're all quite different from one another. This is one reason (but I have more) why I don't really take the concept of the Academy Awards seriously. How can you compare a great Hitchcock film like *Foreign Correspondent*, which has suspense, romance, humour, and JOEL McCREA aplenty, with a serious drama such as *The Letter*, which has a mystery, a fascinating story, passion, and Bette Davis aplenty? They are so different form each other, I don't feel they bear comparison. I love them both.

 

 

And hey, Hitch is even competing against himself; I see the wonderful drama *Rebecca* is up there too.

And I also love *The Grapes of Wrath* , *The Philadephia Story* ( mainly because of Jimmy Stewart), *Kitty Foyle*, and *The Great Dictator*.

When I think about how different these films all are from one another, I think a lot of the time the "Best Picture" must be selected largely based on what type of film the juries like best.

Anyway, clearly 1940, like the the year preceding it, was a bumper crop year for great movies.

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I love the challenge, even though I can't do all of it.

 

 

Best Actor: Henry Fonda, THE GRAPES OF WRATH

 

 

Best Supporting Actor: James Stephenson, THE LETTER

 

 

Best Actress: Bette Davis, THE LETTER

 

 

Best Supporting Actress: Judith Anderson, REBECCA

 

 

Cinematography, B&W: Gaetano (Tony) Gaudio, THE LETTER

 

 

Cinematography, Color: Georges Perinal, THE THIEF OF BAGDAD

 

 

Original Screenplay: Preston Sturges, THE GREAT MCGINTY

 

 

Original Story: ARISE, MY LOVE

 

 

Screenplay: REBECCA

 

 

Here's where it gets even tougher: Best Director and Best Picture. It's probably whichever of REBECCA, THE GRAPES OF WRATH, and THE LETTER that I saw last. One of these films has the greatest opening minute of just about any film, and that film will get the vote for Best Director. The Best Picture will go to the film of the three I'd most readily pop in the DVR player tonight.

 

 

Best Director: William Wyler, THE LETTER

 

 

Best Original Production: REBECCA

 

 

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mw- I thought '39 would be too expected, know what I mean?

 

Actually looking at the history, starting in 1936, the movies take a real turn toward really good visual storytelling and directing.

 

*Best Picture Nominees for 1936:*

Anthony Adverse -- Warner Bros.

Dodsworth -- Samuel Goldwyn Productions

The Great Ziegfeld -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer**

Libeled Lady -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town -- Columbia

Romeo and Juliet -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

San Francisco -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

The Story of Louis Pasteur -- Cosmopolitan

A Tale of Two Cities -- Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

Three Smart Girls -- Universal

 

Other Nominees in other catagories:

*DIRECTING*

Dodsworth -- William Wyler

The Great Ziegfeld -- Robert Z. Leonard

Mr. Deeds Goes to Town -- Frank Capra **

My Man Godfrey -- Gregory La Cava

San Francisco -- W. S. Van Dyke

*FILM EDITING*

Anthony Adverse -- Ralph Dawson **

Come and Get It -- Edward Curtiss

The Great Ziegfeld -- William S. Gray

Lloyds of London -- Barbara McLean

A Tale of Two Cities -- Conrad A. Nervig

Theodora Goes Wild -- Otto Meyer

*ACTRESS*

Irene Dunne -- Theodora Goes Wild {"Theodora Lynn"}

Gladys George -- Valiant Is the Word for Carrie {"Carrie Snyder"}

Carole Lombard -- My Man Godfrey {"Irene Bullock"}

Luise Rainer -- The Great Ziegfeld {"Anna Held"}**

Norma Shearer -- Romeo and Juliet {"Juliet"}

*ACTOR*

Gary Cooper -- Mr. Deeds Goes to Town {"Longfellow Deeds"}

Walter Huston -- Dodsworth {"Sam Dodsworth"}

Paul Muni -- The Story of Louis Pasteur {"Louis Pasteur"} **

William Powell -- My Man Godfrey {"Godfrey Parks"}

Spencer Tracy -- San Francisco {"Father Tim Mullen"}

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Kingrat-

I second your ballot.. :)

except I would have voted for The Letter for Best Picture

 

I would have chosen Rebecca for b&w art direction.

 

Original Screenplay, I love The Great Dictator, but I would have voted for Foreign Correspondent

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you are really missing out on something not having seen All This and Heaven Too. It's a charming little chestnut of a movie with a compelling story, loveley production design and an *excellent* performance by Barbara O'Neil (sp?) as an unhinged villianess that will make you appreciate her total 180 as Scarlett's mother in GWTW from the year before.

 

the kid who plays Boyer and O'Neil's sickly little son *SUCKS* though, brings the whole quality of the production down by half a star at least.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Mar 26, 2013 2:11 PM

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But you see, the problem is that *The Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in 1940* was given (hands down) by Miss Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday , and she was *not* nominated. I also have to say that I feel like Jane Darwell's performance in The Grapes of Wrath is a *leading* and not a *supporting* role, but why quibble? She won and it worked out.

 

The line-up of nominees for Best Supporting Actress in 1940 is *the most outstanding there has ever been,* with all five women turning in performances that would have won the award in a weaker year (well, maybe not Ruth Hussey, but she's still terrific.)

 

 

ps- as an aside, I really feel like the Best Supporting Actor of 1940 was Cary Grant in The Philadelphia Story. At the time, a STAR of his magnitude would've no doubt sooner eaten dirt than accept a supporting nomination (oh, how the times have changed.)

 

 

pss- Jimmy Stewart's smarmy performance is *the big problem* with Philadelphia Story, beginning an odd Oscar tradition of rewarding really inferior work by an actor as an apologia for snubbing a more deserving turn.

 

 

pss- 1940 was an even better year for movies than 1939, but I 'spose that's for another thread.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Mar 26, 2013 2:19 PM

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Mar 26, 2013 2:20 PM

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...and, for those who claim that Russell wasn't nominated because it was difficult to be nominated for a comedy, Stanwyck was nominated for BALL OF FIRE, Garbo for NINOTCHKA, Hepburn for THE PHILADELPHIA STORY, DUNNE for THE AWFUL TRUTH and THEODORA GOES WILD, Lombard for MY MAN GODFREY, etc.

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:}{quote}...

>

> pss- Jimmy Stewart's smarmy performance is *the big problem* with Philadelphia Story, beginning an odd Oscar tradition of rewarding really inferior work by an actor as an apologia for snubbing a more deserving turn....

>

Really? I feel that Jimmy Stewart is one of the best things in it. But then, in the interests of transparency, I will say two things. The first is, as I've confessed several times on these boards, I'm not very good at judging good acting from bad. "I likes what I likes", and sometimes, apparently, what I like is not up to par.

The second thing is, I just like James Stewart. Oh, I like Cary Grant, too, who doesn't? In fact, it's those two actors who are responsible for my enjoying *The Philadelphia Story* as much as I do.

And Virginia Weidler, of course (don't worry, ginnyfan, I wouldn't leave her out !)

 

I've never been much of a Katharine Hepburn fan, but she's perfect for the role of Tracy Lord in this. Her natural "But don't you know, dahling, I'm better than everyone else. I simply cahn't help it" persona fits right in.

 

As for *All This and Heaven Too*, I don't really know why I've never seen it. Heaven knows it's screened often enough on TCM. I'll try and make a point of watching it next time it's on, since you recommend it.

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Hi mw-

Concerning the topic of The Philadelphia Story.

Not wanting to read another's thoughts, but maybe Addison was thinking -like me- that Jimmy Stewart was so terrific the previous year with Mr Smith Goes to Washington, it seemed a shame not to approve him as soon as he came up for the award again.

 

h5. Funny, I only now realized how much the Academy voting can feel like running for Student Council..

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> {quote:title=casablancalover2 wrote:}{quote}Hi mw-

> Concerning the topic of The Philadelphia Story.

> Not wanting to read another's thoughts, but maybe Addison was thinking -like me- that Jimmy Stewart was so terrific the previous year with Mr Smith Goes to Washington, it seemed a shame not to approve him as soon as he came up for the award again

Yeah, except Robert Donat just *totally deserved* it in 1939 for Mr. Chips, it's one of those performances that purely on its own merits outweighs the fact that the actor giving it did not go on to have anywhere near as BIG a career as the losers, see also: Anna Magnani in The Rose Tattoo.

 

Hindsight being what it is, I think the *best* outcome would've been for Stewart to've won in 1946 for It's A Wonderful Life, I mean, Fredric March already had an Oscar and his performance totters on the brink of being supporting...plus there would've been the sentimental angle of Stewart's winning after his return from the war.

 

 

I'm fine with Stewart, I don't care at all for Mr. Smith, (yes, I do have garlic in my soul) but yeah, obviously his work in that one is inarguably a performance for the ages- were it not for Donat in Chips I'd totally toss the gong to him (it's the only Oscar-worthy thing about Mr. Smith, besides the sets and Claude Rains.)

 

He's also first-rate in Vertigo and Harvey and he's just fine in plenty of other films- I just think his work in Philadelphia Story is a misfire, due in large part to the fact that his character is a smarmy d*ck for whom I have absolutely no sympathy. That whole movie revolves around Kate Hepburn getting her comeuppance whereas, to me, Stewart's character is the one who deserved to be face-palmed to the ground he is SO obnoxious.

 

 

Dissing Ruth Hussey like that at the end: phooey!

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Mar 26, 2013 8:43 PM

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How the 1940 Oscars *should've* gone down:

 

BEST PICTURE: His Girl Friday

 

worthy runners up: The Bank Dick, Foreign Correspondent, The Grapes of Wrath, The Great McGinty, The Letter, The Philadelphia Story, Pinocchio, Pride and Prejudice, The Sea Hawk, The Shop Around the Corner, The Thief of Bagdad, Waterloo Bridge

 

BEST ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE: Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday

 

worthy runners up: Jane Darwell in The Grapes of Wrath, Bette Davis in The Letter, Joan Fontaine in Rebecca, Katharine Hepburn in The Philadelphia Story, Greer Garson in Pride and Prejudice, Vivien Leigh in Waterloo Bridge, Ginger Rogers in Kitty Foyle, Margaret Sullavan in The Shop Around the Corner

 

BEST ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE: Henry Fonda in The Grapes of Wrath *

 

worthy runners up: Chaplin in The Great Dictator, WC Fields in The Bank Dick, Cary Grant in His Girl Friday, Edward G. Robinson in Dr. Erlich's Magic Bullet, Sabu in The Thief of Bagdad

 

*the only reason I'm tossing it to Fonda and not Cary Grant for His Girl Friday is variety and the fact that Cary wins the award hands down in 1941 for Penny Serenade, that is one of the finest pieces of acting I have ever seen.

 

ps- it's possible I am overlooking someone

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}You are overlooking REBECCA, a worthy winner.

I think Rebecca is a fine and wonderfully acted film, esp. by Fontaine, Judith Anderson and George Sanders; I think it could have been a *truly great* film had Hitchcock been allowed to direct it without the meddling of David O. Selznick, (the "O" standing for "Oh my God, not another F-ing memo!")

 

I just *cannot* forgive the fact that it is a suspense film where the mystery and tension are ratcheted to a fine point and then *we merely HEAR SECONDHAND about the grand, climactic finale which happens OFFSCREEN!!!!*

 

Seriously, *that's THE problem* I have with Rebecca. Slap a more rewarding end on it, and sure, I'm on board with the Best Picture nom and maybe a win.

 

And I've felt like the wham-bam explosive finale of Foreign Correspondent (and many of the later Hitch films like Strangers on a Train and NbNW ) were a way of Hitchcock's releasing what I can only imagine his pent-up frustration on not allowing the "cork to pop" ONSCREEN in his signature way.

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I disagree. I think "GRAPES" should have got the "best picture" nod. And Carradine for supporting actor!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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>*I don't like disturbances in my place....*

>*Either lay off* (ballot) *politics, or get out.*

Your opinions have value, but so do others. I have thick skin, but others do not. Please keep that in mind.

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This is always a fun parlor game, but one that's usually tough for me to play if I'm really supposed to limit myself to the actual nominees, since I usually would have personally given the award to something that wasn't even nominated. In the four major categories for 1936, for example, there's only one I would have given to an actual nominee - Carole Lombard for MY MAN GODFREY. But I would have also given GODFREY Best Picture. Even though it was one of the most-nominated films of the year, it was surprisingly left off the most important category.

 

As far as Best Director and Best Actor go, give me Fritz Lang and Spencer Tracy, respectively, for FURY. I think Tracy was something a surprise nominee for SAN FRANCISCO, a movie in which he was clearly the second male lead, but he's even better in FURY, a film that I don't think got any nominations at all.

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

> I disagree. I think "GRAPES" should have got ... "best picture". And Carradine for supporting actor!

Yeah, Grapes is a pretty flawless and amazing film, the only reason I picked His Girl Friday over it is because there is no finite number of times I can watch Friday- whereas, masterpiece that it is, Grapes is not a film I want to watch repeatedly. (see also: the Sullivan's Travel's principle of filmmaking.)

 

As aforementioned, 1940 was one hell of a year, and there are a lot of films that could've won Best Picture in other, less stellar years.

 

ps- Yeah, Carradine is amazing in Grapes, but I do feel the need to toss in that the much-maligned third supporting actor victory of Walter Brennan (so much so that the extras lost their voting priveledges by the next year as they were "blamed" for repeatedly picking him as he had risen from their ranks) is somewhat understandable to me. He's *very good* in The Westerner, suggesting that evil lurks behind the quaintest of facades. But he's not better than James Stevenson in The Letter or Jack Oakie in The Great Dictator or some of the other supporting male performances of that (again) stellar year.

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> {quote:title=sewhite2000 wrote:}{quote}

>

> As far as Best Director and Best Actor go, give me Fritz Lang and Spencer Tracy, respectively, for FURY. I think Tracy was something a surprise nominee for SAN FRANCISCO, a movie in which he was clearly the second male lead, but he's even better in FURY, *a film that I don't think got any nominations at all.*

>

>

>

 

awards for Fury (copy and pasted from imdb awards section)

 

[Academy Awards, USA|http://www.imdb.com/Sections/Awards/Academy_Awards_USA/] *Nominated* Oscar Best Writing, Original Story

[Norman Krasna|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0469915/]

[National Board of Review, USA|http://www.imdb.com/Sections/Awards/National_Board_of_Review_USA/] YearResultAwardCategory/Recipient(s)

*Won* NBR Award Top Ten Films

[National Film Preservation Board, USA|http://www.imdb.com/Sections/Awards/National_Film_Preservation_Board_USA/] YearResultAwardCategory/Recipient(s) [1995|http://www.imdb.com/Sections/Awards/National_Film_Preservation_Board_USA/1995]

[New York Film Critics Circle Awards|http://www.imdb.com/Sections/Awards/New_York_Film_Critics_Circle_Awards/]

*2nd place* NYFCC Award Best Actor

[spencer Tracy|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000075/]

Best Director

[Fritz Lang|http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000485/]

Best Film

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Mar 27, 2013 12:45 PM

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on Mar 27, 2013 12:46 PM

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I'm confused by the comments about the ending of Rebecca? Are you talking about the burning down of the mansion? What additional footage would you want to see?

 

Now that 'grand finale' as it relates to the actual Rebecca was a let down since it was only cancer (e.g. that really was a bummer for the Sander's character since we get the feeling dying of an illness was somehow beneath a gal like Rebecca), but I didn't need to see the Anderson character burning to death to make the ending more enjoyable.

 

 

 

 

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Ha, ha, well, you have to watch your assertions on this board because it won't take one minute for someone to swoop in and make you look stupid! I probably should have clarified I was thinking only about Oscar nominations, since that's what this thread is about, but yeah, okay it did get a solitary nomination. But not in any of the big four categories, which is also what I meant to say.

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