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Eugene Pallette


crock1960
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Eugene Pallette has always been one of my favorite character actors, but seeing him tonight in "The Lady Eve" slamming together the chafing dish lids while screaming for his breakfast, had me laughing uncontrollably for about two minutes straight. What a fun movie with a gaggle of the greatest character actors known to Man.

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Oh, I love Eugene Palette.

 

Short and stout and frog-voiced. He made so many memorable appearances on film. The put-upon patriarch in My Man Godfrey *("**All you need to start an asylum is an empty room and the right kind of people")*. A commie-fixated trustee in The Male Animal. Gene Tierney's Kansan cattle-baron papa in Lubitsch's gorgeous Heaven Can Wait. And he will always be my image of Friar Tuck. :)

 

 

 

Palette actually goes all the way back to D.W. Griffith's Intolerance ! He played Aramis in Douglas Fairbanks's The Three Musketeers, too. Really a remarkable career.

 

I wouldn't say I ever confuse the two, but does he remind anyone else of the equally great Walter Connelly? Just wondering?

 

 

 

Edited by: NoraCharles1934 on Mar 30, 2013 8:55 PM

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> {quote:title=NoraCharles1934 wrote:}{quote}Oh, I love Eugene Palette.

>

> Short and stout and frog-voiced. He made so many memorable appearances on film. The put-upon patriarch in My Man Godfrey *("**All you need to start an asylum is an empty room and the right kind of people")*. A commie-fixated trustee in The Male Animal. Gene Tierney's Kansan cattle-baron papa in Lubitsch's gorgeous Heaven Can Wait. And he will always be my image of Friar Tuck. :)

>

>

> Palette actually goes all the way back to D.W. Griffith's Intolerance ! He played Aramis in Douglas Fairbanks's The Three Musketeers, too. Really a remarkable career.

>

>

> I wouldn't say I ever confuse the two, but does he remind anyone else of the equally great Walter Connelly? Just wondering?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Edited by: NoraCharles1934 on Mar 30, 2013 8:55 PM

>

Yes, I know exactly what you mean. I would never confuse the two either, but they do remind me of each other. I wonder if they ever appeared in a movie together.

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starliteyes said...

 

 

I wonder if they ever appeared in a movie together.

 

 

=================================

 

 

 

 

 

According to IMDb this is the only thing they appeared in together (and actually not really "together"):

 

http://www.imdb.com/search/title?roles=nm0657874,nm0175369&title_type=feature,tv_episode,video,tv_movie,tv_special,mini_series,documentary,game,short,unknown

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I went into Netflix last night to run *The Lady Eve* again. I love that scene with the chafing dishes too. I also like watching his genuine warmth always toward Eve Sidwitch (Stanwyck) while barely tolerating his son (Fonda).. Palette shows as a great family dynamic being born Continues after the wedding too..

 

I always think it's a nice tie-in to his Friar Tuck character in *The Adventures of Robin Hood* when first we see Palette coming down the stairs in *The Lady Eve* singing his drinking song.. I keep thinking, "Yeah, the merry men would be singing this when celebrating"

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> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}That's the funniest scene in THE LADY EVE............Bette Davis said that BEYOND THE FOREST would have been more believable if Pallette had played the male lead rather than Joseph Cotten. It's easier to imagine her wanting to leave him.

Well, if you recall, being Bette's hubby didn't work out so well for him in Bordertown. ;)

 

 

 

 

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Eugene Pallette was always a joy to watch, in either comedy or drama.

 

It's interesting to watch his duel as Friar Tuck in the stream with Robin Hood. Tuck was supposed to be a skilled swordsman, so much of the duel had closeups of Pallette and Flynn to make it seem credible that he could hold his own with the Sherwood Forest rogue. Otherwise, let's face it, it's a bit of a joke to think that Eugene Pallette could be a credible sword wielding opponent for a young, lithe athletic Errol Flynn.

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So, Yoda couldn't beat Luke? It's skill that counts. It is conceivable that a highly skilled, older swordsman, even one Tuck's size, could defeat a younger opponent of less skill. More to the point, Robin needed to be warned that Tuck was no pushover, less he miscalculate, and come to harm for it.

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VX, I was referring to the credibilty on screen of Pallette looking like he could give Flynn a real duel. Thus, director William Keighley reverted to a lot of closeups because Eugene, in full shot, could hardly flash a sword like Errol.

 

By the way, Pallette broke a finger during the duel, and also caught a virus that settled in his chest.

 

the-adventures-of-robin-hood-stream2.JPG

 

There were a few long shots in the duel, like this one. For the most part, though, it was closeups and quick edits that made the duel seem somewhat credible. It's a fun sequence, though, with lovable bits of humour thrown in. Flynn and Pallette both gave film fans a good show.

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I'm surprised no one has brought this up:

 

In 1946, convinced that there was going to be a "world blow-up" by atom bombs, Pallette received considerable publicity when he set up a "mountain fortress" on a 3,500-acre ranch near [imnaha, Oregon|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imnaha,_Oregon|Imnaha, Oregon], as a hideaway from universal catastrophe. The "fortress" reportedly was stocked with a sizable herd of prize cattle, enormous supplies of food, and had its own canning plant and lumber mill.

 

(copy-and-pasted from wikipedia.org)

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Besides *The Lady Eve,* another great "beleagured father" role for Mr. Pallette came in *The Cheaters,* an excellent Christmas movie that TCM has only shown once to my knowledge.

 

Here, Pallette plays the pater in a wealthy family that, through extreme extravagance, has run through all of their available funds and faces bankruptcy unless they can get their hands on an inheritance from a deceased uncle. Unfortunately for them, the uncle put an unrelated woman ahead of them in his will, which makes the family start scheming to undo his intent. A down-and-out actor (Joseph Schildkraut) whom they've taken in for the holidays helps them see the error of their ways. The inimitable Billie Burke plays Pallette's wife -- quite a combination!

 

A very funny movie and a beautiful story.

 

(Fortunately, we recorded that one TCM broadcast, so we can still watch it each holiday season. At least one prominent film critic has called for *The Cheaters* to be released on DVD -- I'd definitely buy it!)

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