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Rare original ending of Lost Horizon.....


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The ending of Lost Horizon we are all familiar with shows Ronald Colman climbing back up the remote mountain pass, and then he sees the opening in the mountain that goes to Shangri La, and the camera shows him smiling. The End music starts and we see some bells ringing.

 

But a source at YouTube says the first original ending had Jane Wyatt there at the entrance to greet him, and this ending was soon removed from all prints of the film for some reason.

 

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Mr. Osborne or someone said the real mountain climbing footage in this movie, and film of the trip down the mountain, was bought from a German cameraman.

 

The following are similar scenes from the German movie, Storm Over Mont Blanc, 1930, and they show a man struggling to go down a snow-covered mountain. Seems that several major mountain climbing films were made in Germany in the late 1920s and early 30s, with some of them staring Leni Riefenstahl.

 

I wonder if one of Leni's cameramen shot the mountain scenes for Lost Horizon??

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=uS5nYXn8P_g#t=4094s

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Eeh! Sorry Fred, but I think that guy is a little confused here.

 

Uh huh, 'cause I'm PRETTY sure that footage of Jane is actually one of the outtakes of the "Father Knows Best" episode titled, "Our Cousins the Sherpas are in Town", and that this was an "outtake" because Jane kept calling out the name "Bob" while forgetting to call Robert Young by this character's name of "Jim" as he returned home from that insurance office where he worked.

 

Though I'm not TOTALLY sure about this, you understand. ;)

 

(...btw...interesting find here, Fred...thanks for posting it...I love that movie)

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Wow! Six hours, huh?! Well, I HAVE heard that the cost-overrun for this film caused quite a riff between Capra and Harry Cohn at Columbia, and that it took many years for its costs to be recouped.

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Every time I watch this movie, I wonder if I would prefer to stay at Shangri La, and live 200 years with a beautiful Jane Wyatt, in a very boring place. Or live for 70-80 years in the good ol' exciting USA?

 

Chuck: Back in the USA:

 

 

 

Jane Wyatt at Shangri La:

 

LostHorizon413.Jpeg

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>Dargo wrote: . . Though I'm not TOTALLY sure about this, you understand.

 

>I think the Lost Horizon--Lost Ending included Kitten and Bud vying for the High Lama post, and Fronk is now tending the grounds.

 

LOL

 

Well, if you remember "Fronk" in "Father Knows Best", Char, then I know you were as big a fan of the show as I was.

 

Ya know it's kind of interesting that it's become somewhat fashionable by some to label that program as a "fantasy" and "an idealized image of 1950's American fathers", but I've always been of the mind that this is unfair, because I can recall more than once Robert Young portraying his Jim Anderson character as being "less than perfect" and much more "real" by showing his flaws than the naysayers believe.

 

(...at least I know my own father was very much like Jim Anderson was portrayed, anyway)

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Ya know Fred, that's actually an interesting proposition to ponder, isn't it?!

 

Yep, I think I'd go with stayin' in the good ol' U.S. of A. with the beautiful Miss Wyatt, too. And NOT just 'cause we have Rock n' Roll, but 'cause I hear there aren't any cool cars and motorcycles there in Shangri La EITHER!

 

(...Gearhead here, remember?!) ;)

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Yep dark, I think you're onto somethin' there. Though I have far less memories of Donna's program as compared to "FKB", I do seem to recall Betz's character always striking me as less "fleshed out" than that of Robert Young's.

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Fred, German Mountain Films are actually a genre, once very popular in Germany. The wiki doesn't seem to have an entry for them, but there is a bit about them under a listing for a director:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnold_Fanck

 

I'm pretty sure I've seen that bit of Jane Wyman waving at the returning Colman. I haven't seen the restored version in years. Could it be in the restored version?

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}Fred, German Mountain Films are actually a genre, once very popular in Germany. The wiki doesn't seem to have an entry for them, but there is a bit about them under a listing for a director:

>

> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arnold_Fanck

>

> I'm pretty sure I've seen that bit of Jane Wyman waving at the returning Colman. I haven't seen the restored version in years. Could it be in the restored version?

 

 

It's Jane Wyatt, not Jane Wyman!

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If there was a six hour cut it was a rough cut. There certainly were not an additional 3 1/4 hours of additional scenes. The disastrous preview print was three hours, after which Capra wisely deleted the opening sequence with Conway and Gainsford aboard ship heading home (this scene can be heard recreated on the 1940 Lux Radio Theatre broadcast). Capra realized that the audience was asked to suspend disbelief right at the outset as Conway identified an unknown piece of music written by Chopin. The thrilling action opening of the burning of Baskul grabbed audiences immediately and made for a much more successful release.

 

The significance of the changed ending was that Conway was returning to Shangri-La and all that it represented, not just to Sondra. It was also thought that, though an explanation might be possible (someone spotted Conway and alerted Sondra), too many audiences might find it incredible that Sondra was standing waiting at the entrance to Shangri-La until Conway returned.

 

I hope someday a complete 35mm print of the 132 minute release can be found. In addition to the stills that fill in the gaps where only soundtrack survives, much of the restored version is timed very grey.

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Yes, I'D like to see a restored print myself. All this nonsense of playing the surviving soundtrack over a montage of movie stills is annoying. They did the same thing with the Garland/Mason *A Star Is Born* . If THAT'S the best they can do, I'll take the edited version, thank you.

 

Sepiatone

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