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It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World


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FlyBack, perhaps you can tell me - is Leo Gorcey in IAMMMMW or not? The Sierra Madre/Ann Sheridan thread suggests that just because he is listed in credits, doesn't mean he's actually in the movie. Perhaps he was in the original, super long version?

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hercule --- Leo Gorcey has a brief cameo as the very first cab driver...the one who drives Sid and Edie from the airport to the hardware store. "That'll be two dollars and ninety cents."

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PCat, i wonder if Johnny Winters appearances on The Tonight Show with Jack Paar were "lost" in the same manner as the first 8 years of the Johnny Carson hosted Tonight Show. that is, the tapes were used again and again and no (or very, very few) taped Paar shows survive.

 

video tape units for television were invented in 1956, came into use in 1957 (usually as an alternative to live broadcasts of "prestige" dramas like Playhouse 90), and replaced almost all live primetime broadcasts in 1958. during the 58-59 season videotape came to late nite tv and The Tonight Show with Jack Paar went to all taped shows. this coincided with the rise of Johnny Winters popularity.

 

Winters took his medical absence in 1959 but returned as funny as ever in 1960. when he appeared with Paar alongside other comedians of the era (think Mort Sahl, Shelley Berman, Don Adams, and even Carson who guested on the Paar show), Winters was the funniest man on the couch. this was in the days when guests on late night stuck around. as the show went on (it was on air for 1hr 45min), the banter was spread around in a free-form conversation among Paar (who instigated) and 3 or 4 guests. when the couch was filled with comedians, Winters topped all of them with his quick one-liners and facial antics. in that time Winters held the unofficial moniker of "Funniest Man Alive."

 

 

anyway, i don't hold out much hope for Winters appearances with Paar. Mad......World will have to do, and that only shows 5% of his side-splitting craziness.

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I'd like some clarification on running time for this movie. Is 2 hours 41 min. the running time for the familiar cut up print, and if not, what would the running time be for the fully restored print with all deleted scenes included and has TCM ever shown the fully restored *It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World* before? If not, TCM oughta get to it pronto. I wanna see the whole cut.

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Wayne - thank you. Now I can relax and enjoy the movie instead of looking out every second for Mr Gorcey (& still I've missed him every time). Jonathan Winters, like Jack Benny, could make me laugh with just an expression. RIP JW

 

 

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>I am wondering. - which comics alive at the time of Mad, Mad World did NOT participate or werenot asked. Who turned down parts and why?

 

Here ya go, Vertigo2. This according to Wikipedia:

 

Film and television comedian Ernie Kovacs was originally scheduled to play the character "Melville Crump"[3] before being killed in an automobile accident on January 13, 1962. Kramer subsequently filled the role with comedian Sid Caesar. Kovacs' wife, Edie Adams, remained in the cast as Caesar's screen wife, in part due to the enormous tax obligations that Kovacs left behind. Wally Brown was also going to be given a role but died two months before Kovacs, not long before filming began. According to Robert Davidson,[4] the role of Irwin was originally offered to Joe Besser, who was unable to participate when Sheldon Leonard and Danny Thomas could not give him time off from his co-starring role in The Joey Bishop Show.

 

Judy Garland, Groucho Marx, Stan Laurel, Bud Abbott, George Burns, Bob Hope, Don Rickles, Judy Holliday, and Red Skelton were among the many celebrities offered or considered for roles in the film. Ethel Merman's role was originally written for Groucho (as Finch's father-in-law), who reportedly demanded too much money; so the part was rewritten. Laurel did not want to be seen in his old age, especially without his comedy partner Oliver Hardy, who died in 1957.

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