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FlyBackTransformer

Charlie Chaplin and Pierre Etaix fare

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Not Chaplin in particular...the whole silent screen era in general. :^0 TCM oughta make up their minds. Are they a film outlet for the mainstream movie lover or the pre-1920s artsy foreign film crowd. X-(

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As TCM stands for "Turner Classic Movies", I imagine it would be inclusive to most of the 100 or so years spectrum of movie making. And that includes silents as well. There ARE many people, in this forum as well, that like silent films. I'm limited in my appreciation, and can only enjoy certain ones. As far as Chaplin goes, I much prefer BUSTER KEATON and HAROLD LLOYD. But it's hard NOT to take kindly to Chaplin's *The Kid* . I STILL find it hard to believe that adorable little tyke grew up to be Uncle Fester!

 

Like all OTHER television channels, we all have to endure the showing of fare we don't particularily like, and just be patient and wait for what we DO.

 

Sepiatone

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> {quote:title=FlyBackTransformer wrote:}{quote}Not Chaplin in particular...the whole silent screen era in general. :^0 TCM oughta make up their minds. Are they a film outlet for the mainstream movie lover or the pre-1920s artsy foreign film crowd. X-(

Thankfully TCM already knows what it's doing and does it supremely well.

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> Thankfully TCM already knows what it's doing and does it supremely well.

 

You should re-post this comment the next time TCM runs *Some Like It Hot*. ;-)

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I want to say Haxan but I think that was made around 1920. (That is a very strange and kind of beautiful film.)

 

 

 

 

 

My other guess is From The Earth To The Moon, made around 1903.

 

 

 

 

 

(I'm surprised this isn't a Heavy Metal band named Haxan.)

 

 

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I watched the intro to YoYo, just to hear what RO had to say about, didn't think I'd stick with it, but I really enjoyed it. Reminded me quite a bit of Buster Keaton. Pleasantly surprised....

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> {quote:title=sfpcc1 wrote:}{quote}

> I want to say Haxan but I think that was made around 1920. (That is a very strange and kind of beautiful film.)

>

>

>

>

>

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> My other guess is From The Earth To The Moon, made around 1903.

>

>

 

*Haxan* was made in 1922. I guess any Georges Melies film would qualify, so I was wrong about it being just one. Actually, the film I was thinking of was probably post-1920. I can't recall its name, but it was great. It was a Japanese silent horror film about a guy who was in an insane asylum, and his mother.

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Original post:

 

 

"No Tcm for me today."

 

 

=====================

 

 

 

 

 

You're missin' some good stuff if you're skipping the Pierre Etaix films!

 

 

I hope TCM runs these again!

 

 

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I thought the day was superbly programmed, coupling the two of them. Never having known Etaix's work before, I found his films a lot of fun.

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>Never having known Etaix's work before, I found his films a lot of fun.

 

I agree. These were delightful films. I've never heard of this guy.

 

I don't like the French "new wave" films of the 1950s and 60s, but these films are unique, and created by a very clever guy.

 

I loved the 10 minute film about traffic and parking. The guy from the barber shop driving around looking for a parking place was really funny. That film was filled with events that we all have experienced at one time or another.

 

The Yo Yo film had beautiful photography and a very interesting story told in an unusual way. It was impossible to predict what would happen next, and the film contained a lot of surprises.

 

The one about the secretary was just great and very clever.

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Is this kind of programming what Ted Turner originally had in mind?

 

Notice I am not making a statement. I am phrasing a question as food for thought.

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Is this the kind of programing what Ted Turner originally had in mind?

 

Maybe not, nevertheless, they are interesting movies and a nice change of pace from time to time, better then frequent repeats. :)

 

Twink

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Twink,

 

You misquoted me. This is what I wrote:

 

Is this kind of programming what Ted Turner originally had in mind?

 

There was no 'the' before the word 'kind.'

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> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}Is this kind of programming what Ted Turner originally had in mind?

>

> Notice I am not making a statement. I am phrasing a question as food for thought.

 

Well, foregin language and silent films have always played on TCM. Ugetsu and other foreign language films were even on TNT before TCM was established, as I recall hearing...

 

So the answere is "Yes."

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> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}*Haxan* was made in 1922. I guess any Georges Melies film would qualify, so I was wrong about it being just one. Actually, the film I was thinking of was probably post-1920. I can't recall its name, but it was great. It was a Japanese silent horror film about a guy who was in an insane asylum, and his mother.

That's Page of Madness from 1926. Actually, the film was apparently less completely avant-garde in its time than it appears today - Kinugasa apparently re-cut the film, taking out 1/3 of it, when he found it in the 70s. It struck me that there appeared to be more straightforward story content cut out of the film when I watched it. In other words, he retroactively dressed it up in avant-garde garb (like the music included in that 70s version.)

 

I don't think highly of it myself - mostly seemed like a really flamboyant version of the already flamboyant things the French were doing at the time (which also often produced mixed results because they applied all of these techniques without good reason or without moderation.) The Japanese were very aware of those films in the 20s. However, my impression is completely skewered because I've only seen this version Kinugasa cut and not the original film (which I assume doesn't exist anymore - Kinugasa may have destroyed the material.)

 

Jean Epstein's films and Dreyer's Vampyr are the perfected version of this type of cinema - Impressionism.

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In case anyone's interested Amazon has the Pierre Etaix Criterion collection at the current pre-order price of $34.99. This collection includes all of his films, including five features, The Suitor (1962), Yoyo (1965), As Long as You've Got Your Health (1966), Le grand amour (1969), and Land of Milk and Honey (1971), and three shorts, Rupture (1961), the Oscar-winning Happy Anniversary (1962), and Feeling Good (1966). It will be released on 4/23/13.

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Right. Yesterday's films were a long ad so that people will look into buying them, as you have!

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Oh, goodness, God forbid anyone would want to make money off of these niche products and help them flourish.

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> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}Jonas

> I don't think the sarcasm helps. Take care.

aka - "I'm set in my ways, I'm right, no one's going to change my mind, there's absolutely no reason but making money that TCM does anything." (Because you clearly want to make money if you show Pierre Etaix films.)

 

Really, what's TCM supposed to do? Wait 10 years to show these films that people are interested in seeing to prove that they don't want to make money or help anyone make money off of them, films that require money to be restored and released.

 

You realize, TCM isn't going to make much money from sales of the set. Most people are probably purchasing it outside of the TCM sphere.

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