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TomJH

WHAT WAS THE MOST PERFECT ENDING IN MOVIES?

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For me, in film comedies it would be "Some Like It Hot". That Joe E. Brown dialogue with Lemmon is hilarious.

 

In serious dramas, I'll go with the staircase scene with Swanson in "Sunset Boulevard".

 

In foreign films, anything by Ophuls has a fitting ending, like in "The Earrings of Madame D".

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Well I don't think you could ever have an ending such as The Sand Pebbles in modern movies.  They just don't have the guts for the sixties endings any longer.

Not saying they were 'perfect' but they were certainly different and thought provoking - and real.

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Perhaps it has been mentioned already:  Bridge on the River Kwai.  Plot, themes, all character threads brought together and in a superbly mounted tense finale.

And no music for the last reel.  Apart from the men singing.  Who would be bold enough to do that today in our age where everything is plastered wall to wall with music?

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I guess for me its the following:

 

Casablanca

Now Voyager

The Third Man and the most poignant of all

 

Brief Encounter

 

Some great choices there.    But for the record I have said at this forum that the sudden change by Captain Renault in Casablanca is highly unlikely.   I mean the guy only cared about himself during the first 98% of the film.   But I still love the fact he looks at Bogie and says 'round up the usual suspects!'.

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But for the record I have said at this forum that the sudden change by Captain Renault in Casablanca is highly unlikely.  

Why wouldn't he change his mind and join Rick?  I think that there were subtle hints throughout the movie that he was more sympathetic with the Allies than he let on and Rick was aware of this?  I even believe that his chagrin at Rick letting Joy Page's husband win at roulette was recognition that some things "in this crazy world" required an acknowledgement of goodness over evil.  I always thought Captain Renault was a "good guy" in Vichy clothing. 

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'The Most Perfect Ending In Movies' would always be in the eye of the beholder; these are endings of movies that, for various reasons, I very much like even if they're not happy -or- are even just plain goofy.

 

TEACHER, The (1974) 

SLITHER (1973)

TARANTULAS:  The Deadly Cargo (1977-Tvm)  Just plain goofy ending.  A cinematic marvel . . .

THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP (1975-Musical)

FOUL PLAY (1978)

THING, The (1982) 

GAS (1981)

EVILSPEAK (1982)  Everything the ending of 'Carrie' should've been . . . but wasn't.

ONE-WAY PASSAGE (1932)  (The ending of the 1940 remake had no resonance with me at all + the movie itself unnecessarily a half-hour longer.  Ugh!)

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Why wouldn't he change his mind and join Rick?  I think that there were subtle hints throughout the movie that he was more sympathetic with the Allies than he let on and Rick was aware of this?  I even believe that his chagrin at Rick letting Joy Page's husband win at roulette was recognition that some things "in this crazy world" required an acknowledgement of goodness over evil.  I always thought Captain Renault was a "good guy" in Vichy clothing. 

 

Funny but the discussion I had with others before was now 'good' was Captain Renault.    I say Renault was a very bad and selfish boy.   For example, what he was doing with very young women like the Joy Page character;  demanding sex for an exist visa.  After Rick let's the husband win Renault advises him not to do that with a blonde he wishes to sleep with.    Renault wasn't kidding.  This is clearly sexual exploitation.  

 

Renault orders people in custody to be tortured and than kills them.   I doubt Renault treated only the Lorre character is this way.   I assume he would have had Laslo tortured and killed as well if RIck didn't help him escape.

 

Of course Renault takes bribes but I'm willing to forgive him for that!

 

Now Renault does have a lot of charm but I believe that charm is hiding his true bad boy nature.  Every action Renault took, until the end,  was to benefit Renault (or the Nazis which Renault was beholden to).   So a realistic view of him makes it hard to support him doing the right thing at the end.

 

But hey,  I'm a romantic and I enjoy that bromance at the end of the film.   If I was directing the film I would have ended it in the same  lighter pro-France \ anti-Nazi way.    But I still say there is no way a guy like Renault would have given up his perks, like those women,  and changed his tune.  THAT was pure Hollywood fantasy.

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Nah.  You're all wrong.  It's "The More The Merrier" that's at the top of the list, with Charles Coburn and the chorus of men camping out in the lobby singing "And our 18 children will be glad we said, 'Damn the Torpedoes, full speed ahead!'"

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Just saw a perfect ending to the 1947 British noir, They Made Me A Fugitive.  Trevor Howard's been running from the police for most of the film, wanted for two murders he didn't commit, and then from a crime boss.

 

Yada yada yada Howard confronts the crime boss, gets into your typical brawl to the finish.  The crime boss then falls off a roof and dies, while at the same time the police inspector is beginning to surmise that Howard may be innocent after all.  But since he's still wanted for the murders and a prison escape, the inspector has to take him in, while Howard's female champion tells him she'll be waiting for him when he gets out. 

 

First, Howard brushes the girl off with "That's what I was afraid of", even though obviously he cares for her.  No sentimental goo-goo here.

 

But then here's the kicker:  While pushing Howard into the car, the inspector tells him that if any new evidence should show up, it'll be delivered to the Home Office.  Which leads to this one-two punch:

 

Howard:  "So how many forms will you have to fill out?  Or can't you tell me?"

 

The Detective:  "Millions."

 

And close to fadeout.  Is that classic noir or is that classic noir?

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Not "most perfect" but certainly memorable:

 

A Big Hand for the Little Lady (1966)

 

Married homesteaders stop at a Texas hotel, where he loses big at poker and she takes his place.
 

Henry Fonda • Joanne Woodward • Jason Robards • Paul Ford • Charles Bickford • Burgess Meredith

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