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The Post an Interesting Pic thread


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7 hours ago, cltd said:

I don't see the photos either - but I do know what the Franklin Mint doll looks like.

A friend of mine recently wrote an article about Wizard of Oz dolls for Doll News, the magazine published for United Federation of Doll Clubs members.  Pity they only show the first page of the article online!

https://www.ufdc.org/doll-news/the-authors/

 

I'm reposting both by downloading the images to my computer then using Imgbb  to copy/paste here.

1939-composition-judy-garland-doll.jpg

 

 

Franklin Mint

 

franklin-mint-judy-garland-dorothy-3.jpg

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3 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

Holy mother ship, Batman! Can you imagine the work that went into this thing???

Lol, what about he ending of "Prancer" the WORK that went into the miniture set just for the camera "fly over" ending!!  :blink:

Consider the movie was on a shoe string budget - how much of that went into the construction of it? 

Time mark 3:51 - 4:40

 

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16 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

Can you imagine the work that went into this thing???

A joy for those into it!

One of my favorite assignments as a professional model maker was recreating Dorothy's House, but wish I had been able to fully flesh it out with paint, but that was not the specs. It was table top size prop, about 2 and a half feet square and was mounted on a burlap/cheesecloth "tornado" spitting merchandise. It's amazing how cheesy props photograph when lit well.

MrT has taken this up as a hobby. It's been fun to point out the "styrofoam & corrugated cardboard" builds in his favorite fantasy movies and Game of Thrones sets.

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11 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

One of my favorite assignments as a professional model maker was recreating Dorothy's House, but wish I had been able to fully flesh it out with paint, but that was not the specs. It was table top size prop, about 2 and a half feet square and was mounted on a burlap/cheesecloth "tornado" spitting merchandise. It's amazing how cheesy props photograph when lit well.

Small world I've also been a professional model maker.  I made a model of Ft. Duquesne circa 1755 and sold it to the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.

zslD20X.jpg

detail

Image result for Ft. Duquesne model

 

 

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10 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Small world I've also been a professional model maker.  I made a model of Ft. Duquesne circa 1755 and sold it to the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.

Wow that's gorgeous! I'll see it next time in Ottawa (my favorite city) That's way more detailed than I had to craft for my temporary displays. I mostly work in cardboard, foam core, stacked blocks of foam insulation (for large props) and sometimes small pieces of wood. I have cast multiple parts in resin, but hate the variability of it.

Since I'm a faux painter, it seems that is what really makes a model come together and look real. Otherwise, it's just bits of board glued together. I learned all I know from a Canadian special effects prop artist, so every time I see a movie prop or set say, "I know how to make that" (all except candy glass)

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1 hour ago, cltd said:

After filming it was given to Shirley Temple, here she is showing it to Mary MacArthur (Helen Hayes' daughter) in her bungalow at Fox.

98e3dabf6c35f6eda2935ad7e48c191f.jpg

Didn't realize until you posted the photo Helen Hayes had a daughter.

2 more photos

36633b54cd2300272cbf5aec94dc9e6a.jpg

helen-hayes-usamerican-actress-with-her-

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Helen Hayes at Mary McArthur Hospital, Wellesley, presenting check to Dr. P. D. Howe, Children's Hospital president, while Edward C. Donnelly, Jr., Bay State vicechairman of the March of Dimes, Nancy Locke, and Joseph Locke, polio patient, look on

Notice the old iron lung on the very right poor polio patients were imprisoned in. :(   God bless you Salk for the vaccine. :)

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18 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Small world I've also been a professional model maker.

And is it "hard work" to you? Or are all the hours of problem solving & building a joyous way to spend time? Someone paying you for your expertise, then taking the item away to be used is the best!

It's one of the reasons I love Star Trek the original series. I see the sets & props and think, "One or two guys were given a couple of weeks heads up to create sets & costumes & I enjoy the efforts. 

The real heroes of TV are the crew of Saturday Night Live. I've been watching their videos about producing a weekly live show. I can't imagine the special talents developed by the pressure! What an incredible set/prop/make up/costuming job!

maxresdefault.jpg

(and your skit can be cut in the last minute-poof!)

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

And is it "hard work" to you? Or are all the hours of problem solving & building a joyous way to spend time? Someone paying you for your expertise, then taking the item away to be used is the best!

No, it's not hard work it's interesting work.

Warning the following is mostly for modeling nerds. 😉

You get to read a lot of historical reports, journals, letters, diaries, verbal descriptions (for Ft. Duquesne both in English and French) search for maps and plans and hope they included a profile.  The fort was a Vauban (defence in depth) style four bastion fort with two partial demilunes.  The fort was cocked into the point of land formed by the junction of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers the two sides facing land were protected by two half bastions, one full bastion connected by curtain walls of squared chestnut. The two sides facing the rivers were formed of stockade walls. 

The Ft  Duquesne model required  changing French toise  ( a unit of 18th century measure that was approximately six feet) to English feet, then scaling that down to the scale that worked  for the figurines.

You check topographic maps of the site and see how they fit the period maps. That model was 4'x4' and built to a scale of 112:1 this scale was used to accommodate the 15mm  (they measure these from base to eye height) military figurines.  You can see the figurines comprising a war party at the top right of the overhead shot running down the road away from the fort. 

The model was built on a particle board base. The base serves as the painted water surface of the  Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers. 

See the diorama view below,  which is basically a digitized photo of the model  shot from the side with the landscape added left and right in Photoshop by cloning and digital painting.  

Image result for Fort. Duquesne model

This particular image was as an establishing location shot for Washington the Warrior (TV Movie 2006)

So basically the red outline below is the actual model everything beyond the outline is cloned from the image. the faux digital painting on this is of the clearing to the edge of the forest (usually this was cleared  for the distance of a cannon shot) and the distant Allegheny Mountains. 

o1EDGRc.jpg

Back to model. From the river surface the topography was built up with layered sawdust fiber boards.  This material was nice since with a steel brush on a hand held drill you could raise the nap  making for a brushy/tall grass looking surface. Other topo features such as the  glacis slopes up to the  top of the ditch was fabricated of layered cardboard. Natural materials such as Gilson shifted gravel served as river stones, also for chimneys and for large fort oven. Twigs gathered from  forest served as both stockade walls, tree stumps, and river debris. Wooden matches were used to depict the squared chestnut timbers of the original criblock walls. The criblock walls were filled with plaster to simulate tamped earth. Used old toweling material for the shorter grazed grass on parade ground, and glacis to palisade spikes ( the 18th century equivalent of barbed wire)  enhanced with various model railroad commercial flocking and scenic material. 

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7 hours ago, hamradio said:

Helen Hayes at Mary McArthur Hospital, Wellesley, presenting check to Dr. P. D. Howe, Children's Hospital president, while Edward C. Donnelly, Jr., Bay State vicechairman of the March of Dimes, Nancy Locke, and Joseph Locke, polio patient, look on

Notice the old iron lung on the very right poor polio patients were imprisoned in. :(   God bless you Salk for the vaccine. :)

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Charles MacArthur and Helen Hayes had one child, a daughter Mary. She was a young actress when she died of polio.

James MacArthur was adopted so that Mary would not be an only child.

 

By the way the most fantastic elaborate dollhouse I ever saw was in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry.

My mother was a big fan of a silent movie actress named Colleen Moore-- her trademark were those bangs.

Once we went to Chicago on a vacation and my mother just insisted that I had to see Colleen Moore's dollhouse. Well it was more like a Downton Abbey estate.

If anyone can find a photo of it it's quite a thing to see.

I don't know if there are any Colleen Moore fans on this website. The only film I've seen her in is a talkie, which was very well received starring Spencer Tracy called "The Power and the Glory".

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2 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Charles MacArthur and Helen Hayes had one child, a daughter Mary. She was a young actress when she died of polio.

James MacArthur was adopted so that Mary would not be an only child.

 

By the way the most fantastic elaborate dollhouse I ever saw was in the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry.

My mother was a big fan of a silent movie actress named Colleen Moore-- her trademark were those bangs.

Once we went to Chicago on a vacation and my mother just insisted that I had to see Colleen Moore's dollhouse. Well it was more like a Downton Abbey estate.

If anyone can find a photo of it it's quite a thing to see.

I don't know if there are any Colleen Moore fans on this website. The only film I've seen her in is a talkie, which was very well received starring Spencer Tracy called "The Power and the Glory".

csm_FairyCastle_wide_side_fd4017331c.jpg

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