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ROSE OF WASHINGTON SQUARE Sunday May 5


Arturo
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In what I believe is a premiere for TCM, they will be showing this enjoyable 1939 film tomorrow evening. Conceived by 20th Century Fox as a vehicle for its top two stars, Alice Faye and Tyrone Power, this story of a singer and the gangster she became involved with struck Fanny Brice as too similar to her relationship with Nick Arnstein; she sued the studio. It was settled out of court. Also featuring Al Jolson, this is as good a lead-in as FUNNY GIRL will ever have. Or is it FUNNY GIRL is a good followup to ROSE OF WASHINGTON SQUARE?

 

Edited by: Arturo to correct the spelling of this thread's title.

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I'm actually enjoying this. Don't think I'll totally understand the Jolson appeal but he is always quite fascinating to me. He's actually pretty good in this in re to acting.

 

As Osborne said in the intro, Ty Power is criminally handsome and I love his chemistry with Alice Faye.

 

 

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*Maybe he will be TCM's first SOTM from the Fox stable of contract players, next year on his 100th.*

 

TB:

 

Hopefully he'll be the second Fox SOTM, after Linda Darnell this October. That's two hopes, two long shots.

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I think anyone dying in a house fire is tragic, no matter their looks or talent. I'm sure you didn't mean it the way it sounds. Also, not sure what you mean about marrying for money was her undoing.?Linda Darnell had many problems. 3 marriages, the 2nd marriage was for money. Her last had nothing to do with marrying for money. She had a long standing affair with Joe Mankiewicz , that by all accounts broke her heart.She seemed to have been plagued with many demons, but I doubt that her 2nd marriage was her undoing.

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Lavender, Yes I agree: money was not the real motivator for Linda and her marriages. I really don't understand her first marriage choice to Pev Marley, 42, other than her statement of "He's what I want, an older experienced man", or something like that. She was trying to remain independent of the overpowering presences and pressures of her mother and Darryl Zanuck, both of who continued to view her as a child (she was 19). She had developed a deep friendship towards Pev, camerman on some of her earliest films, and as he joined the service during WW2, she realized how much she was missing him. On the other hand, the end of that marriage was fraught with money woes, as Marley demanded she pay him $125,000 to allow a quiet divorce (earlier he had tried to get $25,000 from Howard Hughes for the same reason). This payment led directly to Linda's future and constant financial troubles. Hubby No. 2, Phillip Leibmann, she did marry partially for security, but mostly to acquire money for her pet charity project, not for herself. She couldn't live with the idea that she married him for the wrong reasons, and divorced him within two years, wanting nothing from him even though she returned to an even worse financial reality. Her last husband, Merle "Robby" Robertson, made an okay living as a pilot, but he quickly, if haplessly and inadvertently, used and overextended Linda's name and credit to finance real estate deals, among other things. Later, he convinced her to let him run her career, and he pushed her in the direction of an ill-conceived and ill -fated nightclub act: he sunk a lot of (her) money into it, she did not want to do it, it flopped in Vegas. Later, when they divorced, he had left Linda's remaining credit a shambles, with her owing back taxes on her property, and her house being foreclosed upon. No, Linda did not really choose her spouses, even the second one, for money. Edited by: Arturo on May 6, 2013 10:13 PM

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"{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}And today would have been Tyrone Power's 99th birthday."{font}

 

It would also be Alice Faye's birthday as well; either her 98th or 100th. They were both born on May 5th, although in Alice's case I've seen both 1913 and 1915 given as the year of her birth. I'm surprised that wasn't mentioned in the intro or exit remarks...or was it?

 

BLU

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*finance wrote:* {font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}*He would have been the handsomest 99 year old in the U.S.*

 

Why? Tyrone Power wasn't the best looking 44 year old when he died. Have you seen him in his last few films? Take a look at The Sun Also Rises or Witness for the Prosecution. Power was clearly starting to lose his looks, and getting middle aged in appearance.

 

Cary Grant might have been the handsomest 99 year old if he had made it that long. Being the health nut that Grant was, at age 80 he was looking better than the drinking, chain smoking Power was at 44. {font}

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{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}*Health nut? Grant smoked a lot. I've seen photos of him, cigarette in hand (maybe he just kept it in his hand, and didn't puff it).*

 

Grant had a reputation as one of Hollywood's biggest health nuts. He, in fact, quit smoking through hypnosis because he knew it was bad for him.

 

Curiously, though, he didn't feel the same way about LSD, which he took before it was an illegal drug. Grant after claimed that LSD sessions with a noted doctor helped free him from insecurities and guilt complexes dealing with his mother and wives. Oh, well, whatever.

 

The point is Grant made it to 82 and still looked terrific. Chain smoking Ty Power died of a heart attack at age 44 and his once renowned handsome good looks were getting increasingly ragged towards the end.

 

{font}TyPowerasSolomon.jpg

{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}

Power on the Solomon and Sheba location shoot, within weeks of his death. {font}

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Not sure what point you're trying to make with regards to LSD how your linking it to smoking.

 

Taking LSD in the way Grant did (under supervision, in a safe environment) doesn't lead to any health issues unlike drinking or smoking. In fact is used correctly (i.e. not for recreation) LSD can improve mental health (as it did in the case of Grant).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}Tyrone Power wasn't the best looking 44 year old when he died. Have you seen him in his last few films? Take a look at The Sun Also Rises or Witness for the Prosecution. Power was clearly starting to lose his looks, and getting middle aged in appearance.{font}

 

 

I absolutely agree! He didn't look as bad as Errol Fynn, but looked much older than his years toward the end. I said this on another thread a couple of years ago and had darts thrown at me...

 

BLU

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*{font:arial, helvetica, sans-serif}bundie wrote: Tyrone Power wasn't the best looking 44 year old when he died. Have you seen him in his last few films? Take a look at The Sun Also Rises or Witness for the Prosecution. Power was clearly starting to lose his looks, and getting middle aged in appearance.{font}*

 

*I absolutely agree! He didn't look as bad as Errol Fynn, but looked much older than his years toward the end. I said this on another thread a couple of years ago and had darts thrown at me...*

 

I'm not certain that, as a man, Ty Power would have been all that concerned about his increasingly ragged appearance, though it caused distress for some of his friends. Power, above all, wanted good work as an actor, thinking that his good looks had helped to keep him largely stuck in sterotypical heroic roles.

 

Take a look at his appearance and performance in the little known Abandon Ship, released the year before his death. It's a grim realistic film to begin with and Power's rough appearance clearly reflects that. It's also one of his finest films performances, in my opinion, pretty close to flawless, in fact.

 

034-tyrone-power.jpg

 

The unfortunate thing, however, is that Power should have been concerned about his increasingly tired looking appearance for health reasons. (He looked particularly aged in The Sun Also Rises, in my opinion, but, apparently, he was going without much sleep at that time) But he also drank and smoked incessantly.

 

When Power became part producer for the big Solomon and Sheba epic he ignored signs of tiredness, and made a point of not being tested to see if he had any heart issues. In fact, he said he didn't want to know if he had heart problems for fear that it would impact his insurability if he did.

 

In November, 1958 Tyrone Power paid the biggest price that a man can pay for ignoring those heart warnings when he was on the set of Solomon and Sheba. He was only 44 but could have passed for a man in his early '50s.

 

 

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> {quote:title=TomJH wrote:}{quote}*bundie wrote: Tyrone Power wasn't the best looking 44 year old when he died. Have you seen him in his last few films? Take a look at The Sun Also Rises or Witness for the Prosecution. Power was clearly starting to lose his looks, and getting middle aged in appearance.*

>

> *I absolutely agree! He didn't look as bad as Errol Fynn, but looked much older than his years toward the end. I said this on another thread a couple of years ago and had darts thrown at me...*

>

> I'm not certain that, as a man, Ty Power would have been all that concerned about his increasingly ragged appearance, though it caused distress for some of his friends. Power, above all, wanted good work as an actor, thinking that his good looks had helped to keep him largely stuck in sterotypical heroic roles.

>

> Take a look at his appearance and performance in the little known Abandon Ship, released the year before his death. It's a grim realistic film to begin with and Power's rough appearance clearly reflects that. It's also one of his finest films performances, in my opinion, pretty close to flawless, in fact.

>

> 034-tyrone-power.jpg

>

> The unfortunate thing, however, is that Power should have been concerned about his increasingly tired looking appearance for health reasons. (He looked particularly aged in The Sun Also Rises, in my opinion, but, apparently, he was going without much sleep at that time) But he also drank and smoked incessantly.

>

> When Power became part producer for the big Solomon and Sheba epic he ignored signs of tiredness, and made a point of not being tested to see if he had any heart issues. In fact, he said he didn't want to know if he had heart problems for fear that it would impact his insurability if he did.

>

> In November, 1958 Tyrone Power paid the biggest price that a man can pay for ignoring those heart warnings when he was on the set of Solomon and Sheba. He was only 44 but could have passed for a man in his early '50s.

I think it would be safe to say that males in general back in those days did not take the best care of themselves, especially guys in show business (heavy smoking, drinking, carousing, etc.). The likes of Gable, Bogart, Cooper, Power and Flynn all look a bit raveged by the time they reached their 40s and beyond. Grant seemed to be the exception to the rule.

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I dont think Power looked THAT bad towards the end. He had aged, yes, but he still looked good to me! He had put on weight and wasnt helped by that slicked back hair look he wore...

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