Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
clore

R.I.P. Ray Harryhausen

Recommended Posts

Ray Harryhausen, the stop-motion animation genius responsible for 7TH VOYAGE OF SINBAD and JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS has passed away today at the age of 92. One of my greatest days was when my son and I got to meet him back in 1989 and had our pictures taken with him - this after I had earlier spent close to a half-hour in his company discussing his career.

Of all of the people involved in film whom I've met, this man was the nicest, most considerate of all. I chanced upon him in a hotel lobby, he was to appear before a panel at a convention. I just wanted to shake his hand and say "thanks for everything" but he was in no hurry and we fell into an exchange that I'll never forget.



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always felt he was over-rated. And quite frankly, I thought he had died some time ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had too (thought he was already dead).....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

His work doesn't move me. It bothers me that it doesn't move me. All these other people appreciate his effects wizardry, but I just don't. In fact, I tend to avoid films that have his visuals in them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now if Harryhausen had applied his stop-motion skills to a remake of one of my favorite movies, Attack of the 50 Foot Woman, that might have produced something interesting. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What sad news. I've enjoyed his artistry since childhood. I am not surprised that your encounter with him was so memorable, clore. He seemed to be a very friendly and humble man from the interviews I've seen. I knew he was still living and really sorry he's gone from us now. Thanks for everything Harry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Willis O'Brien put stop-motion on the map long before Ray Harryhausen with King Kong. Indeed, Harryhausen's break-out film was The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms, a fine effort. Then Harryhausen wastes much of the latter end of his career on all that Charles H. Schneer greek mythology BS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Maybe you had to be 9, like I was, and experience Jason & The Argonauts in a typically huge 1963 movie theater. That movie was the stuff of dreams and nightmares and replays in my head over and over, and stuck with me like no other fantasy film of the period.

 

 

Yes, seeing his Sinbad when in college didn't have the same effect on an older me. But I'm not about to belittle his overall career and what he accomplished in the industry and how I thought and felt about it when I was a little boy.

 

 

RIP, Harry, and thanks for the fond memories. I look forward to a TCM tribute soon.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=darrylfxanax wrote:}{quote}What sad news. I've enjoyed his artistry since childhood. I am not surprised that your encounter with him was so memorable, clore. He seemed to be a very friendly and humble man from the interviews I've seen. I knew he was still living and really sorry he's gone from us now. Thanks for everything Harry.

 

While he was tight-lipped about his methods while he was active, he was quite open to all about his love of what he did and of those things which had inspired him.

 

After all, he started out as a fan himself, attending conventions, forming a friendship with Willis O'Brien, the man who became his mentor and making his own home movies. He understood the mentality and encouraged it.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harryhausen was the Walt Disney of stop motion animation- yes O'brien came first but Harryhausen inspired generations of special effects wizards and filmmakers. Heaven is now a bit more animated.

 

Edited by: joefilmone on May 7, 2013 6:13 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RIP, Ray Harryhausen. I love his work, and I am looking forward to a tribute also.......................

 

Edited by: Geminigirl on May 7, 2013 6:54 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Count me among his admirers. One of the first films my parents ever took me to was The 7th Voyage of Sinbad. The cyclops scared the crap out of me. I am still amazed at how he painstakingly animated his creations. He had to really love what he was doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't know about this until checking in here. I'm old enough to have seen "Twenty Million Miles to Earth" and "7th Voyage of Sinbad" at the theater. You cannot imagine the reaction that his work had on a huge theater filled with youngsters (and not a few parents) who had never seen anything remotely like his magical creatures. Perhaps his stop motion didn't hold up over the years, but his creatures seemed to have a life that CGI can't duplicate for me.

 

"Mysterious Island" had a promotional gimmick that granted free admission to one show if you bought a 10 cent package of cough drops and gave it to the boxoffice. The theater looked like it was full of Gremlins, but everyone had minty breath.

 

As a teen, I sat through two showings of "Jason and the Argonauts" three times in one week.

 

I took my young son to "Clash of the Titans" and have shown my six year old grandson the 7th Voyage to great wonderment.

 

So Ray's passing is sad to me even though he hadn't worked in years. Maybe I'm just mourning my own childhood.

 

Vaya con Dios, Ray.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=Gorch wrote:}{quote}

>

> I took my young son to "Clash of the Titans" and have shown my six year old grandson the 7th Voyage to great wonderment.

>

>

> So Ray's passing is sad to me even though he hadn't worked in years. Maybe I'm just mourning my own childhood.

>

>

> Vaya con Dios, Ray.

>

You're confirming something I thought of in writing to my son earlier today:

 

"Remember our trip in 1981 to the Museum of Modern Art to see the Harryhausen exhibit? You were fascinated, I couldn't get you out of there. We stayed until closing. This was our first real bond in terms of film appreciation and I can imagine that this has echoed with many fathers and sons."

 

He and I saw CLASH four times in the theater that summer.

 

Meanwhile, I just wrote this to my younger son:

 

"Re the death today of Ray Harryhausen: do you remember crawling onto my lap to watch a late airing of MIGHTY JOE YOUNG on AMC? You could not have been more than six, but you sat with me during the entire film and stayed there. You were not one to sit still for long, but without any urging from me, we bonded over the skill of a man whom I had admired since I was a boy. I was so pleased that we had that in common."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ray Harryhausen was one of the greats, and I an glad to see he could bask in the well-deserved fame in such a wonderful one-on-one way, as by the testimony of our TCM fans here.

 

*Jason and the Argonauts* will remain one of the best in my mind. I loved *Clash of the Titans* as well, but Harry Hamlin seemed to distract me more with his good looks, so I missed appreciating the special effects.

4l2jh3.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pleased to meet you, Clore.

 

Movies have been a method for my son and myself to share a sense of wonder and even moral lessons over the years. Our discussions about films and actors are a bonding ritual like dads and sons have with baseball. His own son is still too young to participate, but he is bringing up two daughters pretty much the same way we brought him up.

 

The grandson I mentioned is my daughter's boy. We get him for sleepovers and he's just enthralled by Harryhausen's critters. My wife and I spend more time watching his reactions than we do looking at the screen.

 

I treasure these times spent in the dark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My older son has a pair of 8-year-old identical twin girls. I was there recently when my son passed the torch on one of our favorite films, THE INVISIBLE MAN. They loved it, but it's in the blood, they can't help it. They also responded well to DRACULA, that surprised me, but that new BluRay is so fine that it was as if I were seeing the film for the first time.

 

He also has a pair of twins who are 3-years old, this time a boy and a girl, so in a couple of years, Gramps will be influencing their film choices.

 

Then there's also a six-month-old granddaughter in their home, so I hope to be of some "guidance" for some time to come.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just saw the "TCM Remembers" tribute to Ray Harryhausen - nice job folks. You have my applause for doing such a fine job on such short notice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TCM has prepared one of their TCM Remembers to honor the memory of Ray Harryhausen. Though brief, it is a moving tribute to him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was sorry to hear about this. His movies were a part of my childhood. I was lucky enough to meet him twice.

 

The Academy had a really good collection of his original artwork and models on display awhile back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the Walt Disney Family Museum, we just closed an exhibit on stop motion animation. On display we had a number of Ray Harryhausen's work, including a model of *King Kong* that influenced Ray when he was young and sent him in search of Obie (Willis O'Brien) and Mighty Joe Young.

 

I spent a great deal of time trying to work the rights to clips from some of Harryhausen's films and came to truly appreciate how much he loved the work he did. I wish a couple of studios had been as easy to work with as the Harryhausen Foundation.

 

Thank you to Scott for producing the very touching *TCM Remembers* interstitial. It tugs at the heartstrings of all of us who appreciated the work (and footsteps) that Ray Harryhausen helped pioneer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...