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The Great Gatsby 2013


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The latest film version of The Great Gatsby premiers today, and from what I've read so far, the reviews seem very mixed at best. While Leo DiCaprio and the cast receives some kudos for their performances, the rest of the movie seems to be drawing criticism for excessive computer generated glitziness and deviation from the heart of the story. Personally, I am a bit skeptical about a film set in the 20s that incorporates a hip hop soundtrack, but maybe I'm showing my age?

 

I always enjoy seeing the '74 version, although I think having Jack Nicholson as Gatsby (the producers originally wanted him, but he was too expensive) would have made the film much more intense. And if only the 1926 version could ever be found... this trailer is just a tease:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Asajgm-ciWA

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I am also a fan of the '74 remake, but I'm very curious to see this remake with Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan. Not too sure about a Jay Z produced soundtrack, but I'll give it a chance. When first seeing the previews, was worried that the story and tone of Fitzgerald's great novel in this Luhrmann production would be lost and muddled for a new generation. I so hope not! Should be interesting....

 

 

 

 

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> {quote:title=Hibi wrote:}{quote}OH, NO. It doesnt have period music? I was thinking of seeing it this wknd. I should've known with the director! :(

 

Thanks for the heads up over in the Films and Filmmakers forum, Hibi...

 

Thread over there about the 1949 Alan Ladd version of "The Great Gatsby."

 

Universal came out with a new print in 2012 for the Film Noir Foundation.

The new print was screened at Noir City events across the US last year.

 

Here's Eddie Muller giving a spiel about the 1949 film:

 

(The "thing" Muller refers to in his spiel above is the TV version of "The Great Gatsby.")

 

Universal said "damn the rights" and made the Film Noir Foundation a print of the rarely seen 1949 film.

 

The movie is also available on YT and I've seen the first 15 minutes:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2jh6XkjrHU

 

Looks good so far and will watch rest of movie when I can...

 

Hopefully TCM can get their hands on it eventually...

 

The 1949 version done as a film noir as this "Los Angeles Times" review explains

("Classic Hollywood: A dark 'Great Gatsby'"):

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/apr/16/entertainment/la-et-classic-hollywood-20120416

 

Anyway, new version out today not getting good reviews:

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-207_162-57583889/the-great-gatsby-reviews-are-not-so-great/

 

A trailer for the new version here:

 

So, what can you say? The 1926 version is lost. The 1949 version was done as a film noir, the 1974 version is what it is, and the new version is done the Baz Luhrmann way... (Never saw the TV version,)

They're all different. The new version uses CGI, modern music, and has all the modern bells and whistles that you can afford with a big budget...

It is what it is...

 

Anyway, maybe eventually TCM will air the 1949 version. It's supposed to be Alan Ladd's second favourite movie after "Shane."

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It will be a great joy to me to watch this movie, not only because my buddy Amitabh Bachchan is in it for the blink of an eye, but because THIS IS MY ERA. I was born in the 1920's, and I remember the music (even if they're not doing it in this movie), the dances, the dresses, the lampshades, even. My dad wore knickers when he played golf.

 

What fun to see it in 3D! I love Baz Luhrmann.

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I don't know if this new version of GATSBY uses modern music or not. I know they use it in the TV TRAILER, but quite often you'll hear music in the trailers that's never heard in the movie.

 

 

And although I like DeCaprio as an actor, I have trouble taking him serious in certain roles, mostly because it seems his voice never changed during puberty. It's not easy for me to accept adult level dialouge from someone who STILL sounds like they're 14 years old.

 

 

All I can otherwise contribute is that the Associated Press reviewer's critique in my local paper was titled, "All Glitter, No Soul".

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> {quote:title=mr6666 wrote:}{quote}Hey RMeingast, thanks so much for YT link to the '49 version of 'Gatsby'. Have always wanted to see it.(hey a fuzzy version's better than not seeing it at all!)

Another user on YT posted the entire film here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_PQRC77Km0

 

 

 

> {quote:title=mr6666 wrote:}{quote} Muller was right about Ladd being born to play the role. While the supporting cast was good, it was like we were biding the time 'til he showed on screen again.

 

From what I've seen so far, I like it. Shelley Winters plays Mrytle Wilson with Howard Da Silva as her husband. He's also in the 1974 version but plays Meyer Wolfsheim.

Good cast: Betty Field, Ruth Hussey, Barry Sullivan, Henry Hull, Ed Begley, Elisha Cook, Jr., Jack Lambert (as Reba gets punched out by Ladd), etc....

 

 

 

> {quote:title=mr6666 wrote:}{quote} It was unfortunately almost ruined for me with the hokey, gag-inducing moralistic speeches forced on the ending by the (thank god it's gone) infamous Breen code. Nothing like 'improving' on one of America's most acclaimed writers!

 

 

Yes, read many changes had to be made to film due to Breen Code (Motion Picture Production Code)...

 

Anyway, I'm not saying the 1949 version is good or bad. It's interesting and worth a look.

 

 

Hopefully will end up on TCM someday...

 

Edited by: RMeingast on May 11, 2013 12:11 PM

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> {quote:title=Dothery wrote:}{quote}It will be a great joy to me to watch this movie, not only because my buddy Amitabh Bachchan is in it for the blink of an eye, but because THIS IS MY ERA. I was born in the 1920's, and I remember the music (even if they're not doing it in this movie), the dances, the dresses, the lampshades, even. My dad wore knickers when he played golf.

>

> What fun to see it in 3D! I love Baz Luhrmann.

 

 

After the opening scene in the 1949 version, there's a brief history lesson that features the Lindy Hop, Black Bottom, Charleston, jazz music, bootlegging, the era of prosperity before the 1929 crash, etc.:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_PQRC77Km0

 

OMNI 2, a TV channel we have in Ontario, airs Bollywood films (with English subtitles) three nights a week (Thursday, Friday and Sundays): http://www.omnitv.ca/ontario/schedules/omni2.shtml

 

I'll keep an eye out for your friend... OMNI 2 aired his film "Bunty Aur Babli`` a few months ago: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunty_Aur_Babli

 

OMNI 2 also airs lots of his son`s (Abhishek Bachchan) films... Of course, that film above features both father and son AND the son`s wife Aishwarya Rai.

 

OMNI 2 also airs films from Japan, Communist China, and Taiwan other nights...

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}

> *I don't know if this new version of GATSBY uses modern music or not.* I know they use it in the TV TRAILER, but quite often you'll hear music in the trailers that's never heard in the movie.

>

> And although I like DeCaprio as an actor, .... It's not easy for me to accept adult level dialouge from someone who STILL sounds like they're 14 years old.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

There was a story about the music on NPR yesterday. They use classic songs covered in a largely modern style by modern artists. They played a version of Bang Bang (aka Charleston ) by Will I. Am.

 

*It's the worst thing I have ever heard.* Here's a link:

 

 

 

ps- I'm with you on Leo, but I still applaud the fact that he gets some inn-teresting films made in this day and age.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on May 11, 2013 12:14 PM

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Y'know though, to take it all back to the source: I *don't get* the fuss over the novel The Great Gatsby . It is- at best- a three out of four star book- really more of a novella...an inflated short story...an idea scrawled on a cocktail napkin.

 

I think, if anything, it owes its enduring "popularity" to the fact that it is the go-to book for High School English teachers because the symbolism is so outre and heavy-handed, you'd have to be pretty thick not to grasp it....and it's thin.

 

It's a slender story, with some thin characterizations- in the end: there's not a lot to it- which really, you can also (except for the characterization aspect) say of Tender is the Night, another Fitzgerald novel that I TOTALLY DO NOT GET THE APPEAL OF. Man! Is that thing BOOOOORING. I read somewhere recently that Ray Bradbury re-read Tender is the Night every July. I can see why it would appeal to him (Ray Bradbury is also an author I find to be reaaaaaaally boring and overrated.)

 

I'm not a huge fan of Faulkner, but I get why he's a MAJOR American author. I get why All The King's Men and Catch-22 are masterpieces. I totally agree with many that Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett derserve to be mentioned among the great 20th century American writers. Ditto Edith Wharton and Tony Morrison and Ralph Ellison and Harper Lee.

 

But Fitzgerald?

 

Pffthpt!

 

ps- my apologies to all of you that I did not offend with this post. I'll try harder in the future.

 

Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on May 11, 2013 12:29 PM

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:}{quote}Y'know though, to take it all back to the source: I *don't get* the fuss over the novel The Great Gatsby . It is- at best- a three out of four star book- really more of a novella...an inflated short story...an idea scrawled on a cocktail napkin.

>

> I think, if anything, it owes its enduring "popularity" to the fact that it is the go-to book for High School English teachers because the symbolism is so outre and heavy-handed, you'd have to be pretty thick not to grasp it....and it's thin.

>

> It's a slender story, with some thin characterizations- in the end: there's not a lot to it- which really, you can also (except for the characterization aspect) say of Tender is the Night, another Fitzgerald novel that I TOTALLY DO NOT GET THE APPEAL OF. Man! Is that thing BOOOOORING. I read somewhere recently that Ray Bradbury re-read Tender is the Night every July. I can see why it would appeal to him (Ray Bradbury is also an author I find to be reaaaaaaally boring and overrated.)

>

>

> I'm not a huge fan of Faulkner, but I get why he's a MAJOR American author. I get why All The King's Men and Catch-22 are masterpieces. I totally agree with many that Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett derserve to be mentioned among the great 20th century American writers. Ditto Edith Wharton and Tony Morrison and Ralph Ellison and Harper Lee.

>

>

> But Fitzgerald?

>

>

> Pffthpt!

>

> ps- my apologies to all of you that I did not offend with this post. I'll try harder in the future.

>

> Edited by: AddisonDeWitless on May 11, 2013 12:29 PM

>

Addison, I think you'll enjoy this review of Gatsby... of course you're not alone in thinking it's over-rated:

http://www.vulture.com/2013/05/schulz-on-the-great-gatsby.html

 

And Harper Lee? Hmmmmm... I believe she only wrote one book, and many think she received alot of help from Truman Capote, if he didn't write the whole thing?

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Yeah, I admit that I tossed in Harper Lee 'cause I felt like me list was too estrogen-light. Maybe I could remedy that by substituting Capote in her place ( and still keep the feminine touch.)

 

ps- A Christmas Memory is one of the finest short stories EVER written and it still manages to make me teary, in spite of the fact that I have garlic in my soul.

 

ps- Zora Neale Hurston or Toni Morrison too.

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I wish Leonardo DiCaprio would make a film that is memorable and not forgotten after leaving the theater. He most closely resembles classic movie actors of the past. He just has a nice look about him, but unfortunately, he never makes a decent film.

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> {quote:title=AddisonDeWitless wrote:}{quote}THANK YOU!

> That WAS a great review. I found meself offering up more than one "amen!" to what the critic wrote.

I'm glad you enjoyed it! I remember when I first read Gatsby in my HS senior year I thought it was ok but nothing great. I was more into Hemmingway, Steinbeck and Kerouac back then.

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I've found that the movies that I like the most generally have a score that impress me. John Williams is a favorite. "Catch Me If You Can" has a distinctive score that I really like. Sounds like I'd hate the new Gatsby score - another reason to skip the movie.

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> {quote:title=dianedebuda wrote:}{quote}Just looked up the composer for the 1974 version: Nelson Riddle. May check this version out after all - even though I'm not a Mia Farrow fan; many other cast members that I like.

I did like the opening song for the '74 movie, "What'll I Do?" by Irving Berlin, from 1923. Much more in keeping with the '20s than Jay Z, I think?

 

 

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I could have recognized that as a Nelson Riddle arrangement by just by hearing it. Really liked his arrangement for Linda Ronstadt too - it showed up on the youtube page. Actually have that album/cd. Forgot that Julie London did a bang up job on that song. Shouldn't post youtube links - I get derailed. <g>

 

 

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> {quote:title=dianedebuda wrote:}{quote}

> I could have recognized that as a Nelson Riddle arrangement by just by hearing it. Really liked his arrangement for Linda Ronstadt too - it showed up on the youtube page. Actually have that album/cd. Forgot that Julie London did a bang up job on that song. Shouldn't post youtube links - I get derailed. <g>

Oh dear... I would hate to see you derailed! ]:)

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