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Under Capricorn


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When it IS discussed, it's because of the couple of long sequences designed to appear as if they were done without edits. Hitchcock previously had done this in "Rope" (1948), the movie he shot before "Under Capicorn." The concept was borrowed in 1998 by Chris Carter, the creator and executive producer of "The X-Files" television series. Carter directed an episode titled "Triangle," which begins with a spectacular long sequence in which FBI Special Agent Dana Scully (Gillian Anderson) walks from office to office at headquarters. She even gets on and off an elevator, which means everything had to go right or the scene would have to be reshot.

 

 

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Under Capricorn is the "wrong" kind of essential. big stars, big director, a usually very competent Hume Cronyn as screenwriter and big (for its time) budget leads to a mediocre movie that can bore a movie watcher for a couple of hours (if they don't switch the movie off.)

 

the movie is textbook material for "poormanship" (as opposed to craftsmanship) in movie making. among them: poor color, poor plot development, poor dialog, poor plot resolution...you get the idea.

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I didn't even bother to watch it because Ingrid Bergman was in it. Never been a fan. Oh, she happens to be in other movies I LIKE, so I'll tolerate her, but I won't go out of my way.

 

 

Besides, I've never heard anything GOOD about the film from people I trust, so I opted out. Your previous opinions simply verified the wisdom of my decision.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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>When it IS discussed, it's because of the couple of long sequences designed to appear as if they were done without edits.

 

I studied a couple of those long takes on YouTube and I found that the very long one where Michael Wilding is walking past several windows, outside the house looking in, and then he finally walks into one of the rooms, well, this scene does have a secret break in it. With clever photography and editing, the break is unnoticed by most people. Do you know where it is?

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> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote} I studied a couple of those long takes on YouTube and I found that the very long one where Michael Wilding is walking past several windows, outside the house looking in, and then he finally walks into one of the rooms, well, this scene does have a secret break in it. With clever photography and editing, the break is unnoticed by most people. Do you know where it is?

I haven't watched "Under Capricorn" in a long time, but TCM is showing it again on July 2nd. I'll check on it then and let you know if I've noticed anything. By the way, the edits in "Rope" are very noticeable.

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You mean at the start of the movie, where he is standing in front of large windows talking when Cotten walks up to Wilding and they both walk out of the bank ?

 

It is when they both walk out of the bank that I see a definite 'break' in the movie.

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The only reasons I watched this was because of two names: Ingrid Bergman, my favorite actress, and Alfred Hitchock, my favorite director. The movie wasn't terrible, but....meh.

 

The best part is Ingrid's long story/speech to Aldare.

 

After seeing this and Jamaica Inn, it was interesting to see that Hitch didn't always make great movies every time out.

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