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Shadowlands


LLS207
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Hello:

 

In the movie Shadowlands Sir Anthony Hopkins is wearing a gold chain in his suit pocket where the handkerchief is usually kept.

Can someone tell me what this gold chain represents.

Thank you,

Regards,

Larney Sager

Nashville, TN.

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Hello, an interesting question, however, I do not have an answer. I saw *Shadowlands*, or *Through the Shadowlands*, (1985) with Joss Ackland and Claire Bloom many years ago on television. The theatrical release with Hopkins and Winger never interested me, and as a result I did not know about the watch in the pocket. In the version I saw, Ackland as C. S. Lewis is shown either with a handkerchief or a pen in his pocket, which matches every photo I have seen of Lewis. I suppose the watch was simply a decision of the costume designer, but I would be interested to know what prompted the choice.

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I would rather watch a black and white movie before newer colored movie, but I watched Shadowlands six times. It s great.

As far as what is in his handkerchief pocket, it is a gold flat piece of jewelry. I do not think I can discribe it well enough.

My favorite movies are from 1930 to 1949.

 

Regards,

Larney Sager

Old Hickory, TN.

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TCM has broadcast Shadowlands and another great movie, "Remains Of The Day".

On another subject, I watched "The Lady From Shanghai" last night. I had ever watched it.

I was very disappointed to read that much of the film was cut and they they used film to patch the movie. From what I readit was too long.i like it, even though the reviews I found on line didn't give it the credit it deserves. It also did not do well at the box office when it first came out.

 

Larney Sager

Old Hickory, TN.

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What disappointed you about the much of the film being cut? I mean without seeing an uncut version of the movie how can one have any opinion? (well unless one views anything Welles would want as superior to what the studio producers wanted).

 

My view is that Welles was the type of artist that needed some restraint. So for all we know the cuts resulted in a better final product.

 

 

 

 

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When a film is cut I feel like it has been censored. It is just an idiosyncrasy of mine.

As I said, I read some reviews and analysis of the movie, i.e. http://www.postmodernjoan.com/ladyfromshanghai.htm

 

I also did not know that Wells needed restraint.

 

Also see...www.filmsite.org

I found not only the movie interesting, but what was going on in the to stars lives at the time.

 

On another note.....I watched three different trailers on, "Behind The Candelabra" today.

It will be on HBO Sunday May 26th at 8:00PM, CDT.

I watch the making of the movie. Alot of time and hard work went into the sets. Some costumes had to be made. Some came from the museum.

I met him when I was about ten. Backstage after a concert at the Waverly Theater in I believe it was Chesire, Connecticut.

I have ways loved his playing.

Regards,

Larney Sager

Old Hickory, TN.

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Well every single movie ever released was 'cut'; i.e. a lot more film was shot than what is in the final release. This is called the editing process. Note that I'm not trying to be a wise guy here, but what scenes, shots and even actors, that end up in the final release, is one of the major processes in film making.

 

For example, sometimes the entire performance of an actor is removed during the editing process. (this has been discussed at this forum because sometimes the actor is still listed in the credits!) This occurs with entire scenes as well and of course select parts of a scene. Note that the editing process is something I really interested in as it relates to studio era movies. I really wish I knew who had the final say in this editing process between the studio bosses, producers and director for certain movies. Talk about a power struggle!

 

In fact many directors, once they had the clout, became producer directors just to ensure they had control over this editing process. In the case of Welles, he left Hollywood for Europe and a primary reason was because he wanted more control and didn't like to deal with producers 'messing with' his work.

 

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I had thought the director sat with a film editor and edited the movie. Have you ever watched the documentary, "This Film Has Not Been Rated"?

The editing process boggles my mind. You know too many cooks.....etc.

I cannot imagine how they did it during the Hays era.

I cannot imagine how you learn to edit moves.

 

Larney Sager

 

 

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