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True Confessions


Dothery
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Well. One of my favorites. And as an old-time Catholic, I can say without fear of contradiction that it was on the money technically.

 

I loved seeing DiNero and Duvall together. They played off each other like real brothers. No hoke there. I particularly liked DiNero. I'd seen him plenty before this picture and sometimes I liked him and sometimes I didn't. This time I felt he was deep-down real.

 

A good picture all the way around. Charles Durning was unbelievable. Burgess Meredith didn't put a foot wrong. An amazing bunch of people. Brenda, the madam, was really gripping. And could she take a slap. I remembered every bit of this picture from the first time I saw it, but I couldn't turn it off.

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Don't feel embarrassed, when I went to watch the movie I was expecting a remake of the Carole Lombard movie! :)

 

 

 

PS: Are you aware there is an edit feature? Now there is a time limit before the edit icon goes away but since your initial post was a very recent one the edit icon should of been available.

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Thanks, Mr. 6. That's an interesting Ebert review. I see his point, but at the same time the movie didn't seem unresolved to me at the end; it was just like life really is. Things drift along sometimes and don't come to a conclusion. Anyway, I loved it. It's the most real I've ever seen De Niro. I would half expect him to be like that in person if I met him at a party.

 

Duvall, on the other hand, I would expect to see doing a tango in the middle of the dance floor. (No, I'm not nuts; he does that. I have a friend who used to be a limo driver, who took him to the tango dance halls with his lady friend/wife, I don't know which.)

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Mr. Guitar, now that's funny, that you were expecting a Carole Lombard script and got the brothers instead ...

 

I knew Milburn Stone for a while and he used to tell us great stories about Carole Lombard. He thought the world of her. He was just a bit player in her movies but he knew her. She didn't go off by herself between scenes; she just sat with the others to talk.

 

Thanks for the tip. I know about the edit feature, but by the time I realized my goofy spelling, it was gone, so I wrote the note instead. I didn't want everybody to think I was completely ignorant of the finer points of stars' names.

 

I'm driving up to Kona next week. Be looking for your special place.

 

 

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Good script, fine acting, and nice period detail. I've seen it a few times before,

but I had forgotten some of the details surrounding the murder. I also got a

kick out of Charles Durning's little jig at the wedding, even if he was a sleazy

character. And if GQ ever did a special well-dressed priest's issue, Robert

DeNiro's Des would have made it. By the end he had already made his decision

to be a priest and not a glad hander, still there's quite a contrast between LA

and that little rural outpost where he wound up. There are many more things

to the film, but it's hard to overlook the huge black eye the 1940s LAPD and the

LACC get in this story. Ouch.

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Man wish I was in Kona. One cannot miss my special place. It is right across the street from a small but very nice blue painted church and to the right of that (facing the ocean), is a native burial ground monument.

 

Carole Lombard is my favorite female comedy actress with Jean Arthur a close second.

 

 

 

 

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