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What is your favorite submarine movie?


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{font:arial}{size:small}I am a sucker for submarine movies and may easily be glued to my television until 8PM this evening.{font}

 

{font:arial}{size:small}My favorite World War 2 submarine movie (which just ended) is {font}*Destination Tokyo*{font:arial}{size:small} with a fantastic cast starting with Cary Grant and John Garfield, special effects that, although obviously of their time, were very well done, and a story with a number of fine personal scenes. A close second is {font}*The Enemy Below*{font:arial}{size:small} (which, sadly, is not being shown today) with Robert Mitchum and Curt Jurgens outstanding as two professionals in a battle of wits.{font}

 

 

For post-World War 2 submarine movies, my favorite is *The Bedford Incident* with the third pairing of Richard Widmark and Sidney Poitier. My second favorite is *The Hunt for Red October* with Sean Connery as the most Scottish-sounding Russian to ever grace a movie screen.

 

 

As for pre-World War 2 submarine movies, my favorite is *The Land That Time Forgot* with Doug McClure. And, yes, I expect humorous comments at my expense regarding that one! :)

 

 

 

Edited by: LiamCasey on May 25, 2013 12:56 PM

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Good choices, Liam. But we can't forget *Run Silent, Run Deep* . I wouldalso add *20,000 Leagues Under The Sea* . Along with "RED OCTOBER", I'd add *Crimson Tide* and *U-571* .

 

 

No horse laugh from me on *Land That Time Forgot* . A silly effort, to be sure. But lots of fun escapism.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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AND, let us not forget Fantastic Voyage !

 

I mean, in what OTHER movie could you find a scene such as THIS where Stephen Boyd is caught checking out his submariner boatmate's "finer points" like this, huh?!

 

18a1549e51e86f3d899796a48882f5045db7531_

 

(...okay, okay...so there WAS that one short scene in Run Silent, Run Deep where it appears Lancaster is checkin' out Gable for a split second TOO, but THAT doesn't count!!!)

 

;)

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> {quote:title=Sepiatone wrote:}{quote}
> Good choices, Liam. But we can't forget *Run Silent, Run Deep* . I wouldalso add *20,000 Leagues Under The Sea* . Along with "RED OCTOBER", I'd add *Crimson Tide* and *U-571* .
>
> No horse laugh from me on *Land That Time Forgot* . A silly effort, to be sure. But lots of fun escapism.
>
>
> Sepiatone
>
>
Also four enjoyable submarine movies, Sepiatone.
Needless to say, I do plan on watching today's showing of *Run Silent, Run Deep* (and not for the first time). One of the big plusses story wise for a submarine movie is the combination of characters in conflict and a claustrophobic setting. When the characters in question are played by actors of the ilk of Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster as in this movie, the results are excellent. To be honest, there are so many fine World War 2 submarine movies that I would have a hard time arguing against someone who gave me a top-five listing that included neither *Destination Tokyo* nor *The Enemy Below*.

Although *20,000 Leagues Under The Sea* would qualify as a pre-World War 2 submarine movie, it feels like it should fall into a separate science-fiction category. But an excellent choice with James Mason as an outstanding Captain Nemo. And it is (in my opinion) a better choice than *The Land That Time Forgot* so I am bit ashamed of myself for forgetting about it.

I also enjoyed both *Crimson Tide* (With Denzel Washington and Gene Hackman playing the characters in conflict in this one how can one not enjoy it?) and *U-571*. Although I have to admit that the rewrite of history in the latter bothers me. Americans (and I am one) don't always have to be the heroes.
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> {quote:title=JakeHolman wrote:}{quote}Not my favorites but two others: Torpedo Run and Das Boot. Your picks are very good.
> Jake in the Heartland
And, again needless to say, I am currently watching *Torpedo Run* (and, again, not for the first time) and enjoying it. Like I said, I'm probably glued to the television for the day!

And, at the risk of being voted of the message board island due to my unworthiness, I must admit that I have yet to see
*Das Boot*. It is one of those movies that I know I should watch but have yet to get around to.

Now if I can only figure out why I occasionally lose my spacing between paragraphs as in my last post.
:(

Or correct quote boxes as in this one. :_|

Edited by: LiamCasey on May 25, 2013 2:05 PM

Edited by: LiamCasey on May 25, 2013 2:06 PM
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Das Boot beyond a doubt for me. Run Silent, Run Deep is second but a ways back. The Hunt For Red October would be third but I thought the novel was better than the movie though the movie version is still very good.

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I believe *The Enemy Below* (1957) and *Das Boot* (1981) are the most realistic depictions and draw me into what I believe the life must be.

 

*Around the World Under the Sea* (1966) should be noted.

 

I wish all could see: *The Secret of Two Oceans* (1955) as it does not deal primarily with submarines but is a nice little movie and it does star Igor Vladimirov who is very easy on the eyes.

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> {quote:title=roverrocks wrote:}{quote}Another fine movie about a submarine, a commander, a crew, and great despair was On the Beach.

That prolonged scene in On The Beach where we first see the *"PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO"* sign, then see the deserted streets, and finally see that Coke bottle causing the windowshade to blow in the wind, in turn causing the telegraph machine to keep sending signals - - - signals that had brought the submarine on a wild goose chase all the way from Australia - - - that's got to be one of the best buildups to a total anticlimax that I've seen in any movie.

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Run Silent, Run Deep is good, but my favorite is Destination Toyko. Besides

the adventure elements, there are some good comic moments with all the

different types of folks put together in that enclosed space, and I still think

Garfield's fairly large female mannequin is a bit kinky. I wouldn't get too close

to that guy.

 

 

Other kind of sub: A tie between Blimpie and Jersey Mike's.

 

 

Favorite sub song: Submission by the Sex Pistols.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vtWkQoy1hE

 

 

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Yellow Submarine without a doubt.

 

I actually was very impressed with Das Boot when I first saw it in the mid-nineties, but then I read Stuart Klawans glancing comment on it in his review of Air Force One when he described it as saying "Nazi sailors were must regular guys." And then my esteem just went pop!

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The recent film PHANTOM, which vanished in about a week, was actually quite good. It will soon be out on DVD and presumably available through Netflix. Ed Harris plays the captain of a rust-bucket Soviet sub that's suddenly ordered to sea for one more mission. A few men know what the real objective is, but the captain doesn't. Lots of suspense, and several crew members have to make choices with life or death consequences. Harris is great, and so is William Fichtner as his second in command.

 

 

The producer of the film said that the target audience is men over 35, and that described all 10 of the people in the audience the night I saw it.

 

 

This is based on the episode recounted in the book RED STAR ROGUE.

 

 

My favorite submarine movie: THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, though several other good ones have been mentioned.

 

 

 

 

 

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But skim, it's true! As most people living in the communist soviet Union WEREN'T communists, most nazi soldiers didn't give a rat's bum about Nazism. But they WERE soldiers and "patriots" to their country. As were the sailors. They too, had a loyalty to their country, in spite of whatever the government policies were; left mothers, wives and children behind in order to defend it, just like US. Oh, I'm sure there might have been a respectable number who thought Hitler was the "bee's knees", but overall, I'd say that the largest number of them were just doing their jobs, like most of the G.I.'s were doing.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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> skimpole wrote;

>

> I actually was very impressed with Das Boot when I first saw it in the mid-nineties, but then I read Stuart Klawans glancing comment on it in his review of Air Force One when he described it as saying "Nazi sailors were must regular guys." And then my esteem just went pop!

>

Interesting that you would let one critic's comment on the film make you like it less or not at all. I think it's a great film.

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That's pretty much what I was plannin' on sayin' in response to skimpole's comment too, Sepia.

 

One of the things that makes Das Boot a superior WWII film is that Petersen expertly shows the effect the war had on the lowest ranks of those who served in the German Navy, and most of whom were not ideologues to their leaders' cause but were just doing their duty to their country.

 

This would be similar to how Eastwood's recent Letters from Iwo Jima humanizes the combatants of our enemies' forces during this conflict, and steers clear of propagandizing the content of these films.

 

Btw, if you've ever been inside a WWII-era submarine as I have(the retired USS Pampanito is docked and open to the public along San Francisco's Fisherman's Wharf), it brings home the fact that unlike most WWII Hollywood submarine movies where it makes it seem reasonably spacious inside these things, Das Boot might have been the first film to more realistically show how very very VERY cramped and claustrophobic these boats actually were.

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> {quote:title=kingrat wrote:}{quote}

>

>

> My favorite submarine movie: THE HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER, though several other good ones have been mentioned.

>

>

>

>

Gotta say HUNT FOR RED OCTOBER is my favorite, too, though for comedy I also enjoy some childhood favorites THE INCREDIBLE MR LIMPETT and OPERATION PETTICOAT

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I agree. Almost people in the world over 10,000 years of recorded history have just been average Joes and Jills caught up in the quagmires and wars of brutal ideologues and fanatics. We today demonize Muslems but most are just average people trying to eat, sleep, raise families, and survive the terrors they never asked for or were brainwashed into. They all could be "us" and we all could be "them" but for the accident of our birthplaces be they WW2 German soldiers, Red Army soldiers, Japanese soldiers, or British/American soldiers.

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