Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Remakes Redux: :xudeR sekameR


TopBilled
 Share

Recommended Posts

I love being able to compare the remakes that TCM is airing today. If they haven't already done so, it would sure be fun to have a month-long series about classic remakes.

 

Some thoughts/questions...

 

What is the shortest time between remakes? Only four years had passed when Warners decided to remake TWO AGAINST THE WORLD (the second version with Bogart was retitled for television as ONE FATAL HOUR). I am thinking there must be another that was remade in less than four years. Anybody know?

 

And what was the longest span between remakes?

 

Which actor or actress seems to have appeared in the most remakes?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would make sense that a silent picture was soon remade as a talking picture. Thanks for that info!

 

Some of the performers who seem to appear in a lot of remakes are: June Allyson, Shirley Temple and Steve Martin.

 

Some actors appear in both the original _and_ the remake. For instance, Don DeFore is in THE MALE ANIMAL and SHE'S WORKING HER WAY THROUGH COLLEGE-- which are both based on the same Broadway source.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Random thoughts:

 

There were just 4 years (and a little ol' innovation known as sound ;) ) between Gloria Swanson and Joan Crawford's turns as Somerset Maugham's famous prostitute in Sadie Thompson (1928) and Rain (1932), respectively:

 

swansonassadie.jpgsadie.jpg

 

Alan Hale played Little John in three different Robin Hood tales (over a 28 year span!) - Fairbanks's 1922 version, the 1938 Technicolor Flynn classic, and opposite John Derek as Hood's son in 1950's Rogues of Sherwood Forest:

 

Alan%2520Hale%2520as%2520Little%2520JohnLJ38.jpgtumblr_lngetddi0l1qc4gp6o1_r1_400.jpg

 

Lewis Stone played the lead in the 1922 silent version of The Prisoner of Zenda and had a cameo in the Technicolor remake with Stewart Granger in 1952 (my favorite's still the '37 Colman version :) ).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Humphrey Bogart *One Fatal Hour* is of course not a remake of the *Two Against the World* they showed today (what a nutty ending!), but of *Five Star Final*, which is a really good movie.

 

As for the shotest time between remakes, how many movies that were basically *Madame X* were made before they really started cracking down on the code?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While he doesn't really do a lot of remakes in the strictest sense of the word, surely no modern actor has done more reimaginings of characters already established onscreen and in other media by previous actors than Johnny Depp: The Mad Hatter, Sweeney Todd, Willy Wonka, Hunter S. Thompson, Tonto, Barnabas Collins. Now the rumor is he's going to be in a THIN MAN reboot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

JONNY DEBB'S movies might suck, but JOHNNY DEPP'S movies aren't really all that bad. We ALL know some of our favorite actors have done their share of "stinkeroo" movies, and Depp's no exception. But his turns in "Gilbert Grape", "Donnie Brasco" and the guy in Blow prove he's got the stuff.But for pure remake "suckiness", Steve Martin wins the "Bleh Ribbon".Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}Good post, Nora. Lewis Stone was also in both MGM versions of SCARAMOUCHE.

Thank you very much. :)

 

Just remembered that Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum and Martin Balsom, who starred in 1962's Cape Fear, all made appearances in Scorsese's 1991 remake.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Directors remaking themselves:

 

Ernst Lubitsch redid his silent The Marriage Circle (starring Monte Blue, Florence Vidor, Marie Prevost and Adolphe Menjou) as One Hour with You (with Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette MacDonald, Genevieve Tobin and Roland Young in the respective roles).

 

Leo McCarey of course directed both Boyer and Dunne in Love Affair and Grant and Kerr in An Affair to Remember (I much prefer the former).

 

Hitch did two takes on kidnapping and international assassination attempts with The Man Who Knew Much in both 1934 and 1956. They make an interesting pair - two very different results on the same premise.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just found one that has a slightly longer span: POLLYANNA. The first version was produced as a silent film in 1920 with Mary Pickford. The Hayley Mills-Disney remake occurred in 1960, forty years later.

 

I still think there may have been other remakes that were more than forty years in the making.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do think Depp is versatile and very talented. However, he may have shoehorned himself into now taking only these sort of goofy, very showy roles. I think he was at one time perceived as an indie darling, but his career took a decidedly sharp left turn when he accepted the role of Captain Jack Sparrow for the extremely mainstream Disney studio. I've read before that horrified Disney execs were watching dailies of that first PIRATES film and allegedly begging Depp to tone down his performance, make it a less broadly comical and off the wall and more conventionally heroic. I think maybe they had in mind that Depp would be more like Harrison Ford to Orlando Bloom's Mark Hammil. Ford certainly has his comic moments in STAR WARS, but they're more grace notes to the performance rather than being the centerpiece. But Depp did it the way he wanted to do it, and the result certainly paid off for both him and the studio in terms of an Oscar nomination for Depp and a smash hit franchise that produced three (increasingly less entertaining) sequels. Depp had already made a couple of great movies with Tim Burton in ED WOOD and EDWARD SCISSORHANDS (Burton's two best films?), but after PIRATES, the pair collaborated on a number of, in my opinion, visually interesting and usually entertaining but sort of oddly slick and soulless projects, your ALICE IN WONDERLAND, CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY, DARK SHADOWS and SWEENEY TODD. Even the upcoming LONE RANGER has Mrs. Tim Burton (Helena Bonham Carter) in a supporting role. I thought there was something to recommend in all those movies, but they're increasingly feeling like product to me. Just my two cents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> {quote:title=TopBilled wrote:}{quote}I just found one that has a slightly longer span: POLLYANNA. The first version was produced as a silent film in 1920 with Mary Pickford. The Hayley Mills-Disney remake occurred in 1960, forty years later.

>

> I still think there may have been other remakes that were more than forty years in the making.

Well, there was The Women in 2008. That was 69 years after the Shearer-Crawford catfest. :)

 

220px-Poster_-_Women%2C_The_01.jpg220px-Womenposter08.jpg

 

But no, I'm not looking forward to ever seeing this particular double feature. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0524403/?ref_=tt_ov_wr

 

Looking at Luce's credits at the IMDB, there was only a 16 year span when THE WOMEN was remade for television in 1955. Then, MGM did a musicalized version starring June Allyson the following year, retitled as THE OPPOSITE SEX. Then, 22 years later, it was remade again for television. And then 25 years later, it had another television remake. Then, six years later came the next feature film version.

 

As for POLLYANNA, it looks like there was a Spanish television series based on the book in 1958, but in terms of movies, we still have a 40 year span.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS (1944), shown tonight as part of Eleanor Parker's SOTM, is a remake of OUTWARD BOUND (1930), which will be shown early Friday morning.

 

 

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS is a fine film, with Paul Henried, Eleanor Parker, John Garfield, Faye Emerson, Sydney Greenstreet, Sara Allgood, and George Coulouris. Music by Erich Korngold.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stella Dallas 1925 - Silent and first version with Belle Bennett in the title role.

 

...12 years later...

 

Stella Dallas 1937 - Sound remake of silent version(but then again, this was standard practice after Jolson said "You ain't heard nothin' yet!" and the public responded with approval: see "Singin' in the Rain" for further details ;) ) starring Barbara Stanwyck in the title role.

 

...53 years later...

 

Stella 1990 - Schmaltzy and somewhat anachronistic version starring Bette Midler in the title role.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...