Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

I SEE A DARK STRANGER, a wonderful British film


FredCDobbs
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is such an interesting movie. It is filled with clever dialogue, with an unusual and interesting story, a very English-Irish story and complex, but easy to follow and of interest to Americans and Canadians since the film script explains the English-Irish conflict very well, especially in relation to the Germans and WW II. This is Deborah Kerr's best films, made when she was 25 years old.

 

The director and screenwriter, Frank Launder, is not very well known today, but he also wrote the screen play for THE LADY VANISHES and NIGHT TRAIN TO MUNICH.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Irish-Germany thing during WW II is very interesting, although it is not mentioned much by any media today.

 

I grew up as an American thinking that Americans, Canadians, Irish, Scottish, Australians, etc. were pretty much the same thing, just different "cousins" of the same ancestors.

 

But when I see some old movies I see that many Irish people thought of the Invading English as being very "foreign" and "bad". That's what makes this movie so interesting.

 

Here is some history stuff:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_neutrality_during_World_War_II

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree, Fred. I also think this is a very entertaining movie with excellent acting which presents the ol' "The enemy of my enemy is my friend" aspect in regard to the seldom examined British/Irish relationship during WWII.

 

(...but then again, ANY movie with the lovely Deborah is gonna be good, eh?!) ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And we agree yet again, Fred! ;) A beauty AND a great actress, to be sure.

 

Every time I watch one of my favorites, "Colonel Blimp", I'm amazed that at such a young age, she very believably carries off the trick of playing 3 different characters in it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I watched the beginning of the film and had to run, wish I had recorded it. It looked really good. I love Deborah Kerr -- one of her really early roles is in Major Barbara, a great bit part. Btw, the Irish/German connection is also explored, briefly, in Ryan's Daughter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In *The Man Who Never Was*, the Nazis hire Irishman Stephen Boyd to travel to Britain to find out whether the information identifying the dead body that washed up in Spain (placed there by Clifton Webb) is accurate or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...